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eBook The Handbook of Texas Music epub

by Roy Barkley,Douglas E. Barnett,Cathy Brigham,Gary Hartman,Casey Monahan,Dave Oliphant,George B. Ward

eBook The Handbook of Texas Music epub
  • ISBN: 0876111932
  • Author: Roy Barkley,Douglas E. Barnett,Cathy Brigham,Gary Hartman,Casey Monahan,Dave Oliphant,George B. Ward
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Texas State Historical Assn (August 8, 2003)
  • Pages: 393 pages
  • ePUB size: 1646 kb
  • FB2 size 1765 kb
  • Formats docx lrf mbr lrf


For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents . This is a very good book covering Texas Music History

For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions in this state where east meets west. This is a very good book covering Texas Music History. However, I was disappointed at first, that it did not have an individual entry for "The Texas Tornados", ZZ Top, or even Billy Gibbons. So, I looked at the criteria used by the authors. They only gave individual entries to deceased musicians, at or around time of publishing the book in 2003.

For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions in this state where east meets west, southern plantations meet high plains ranches, and where a. .

The music of American Indians, Anglo-Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and numerous immigrant groups - Germans, Czechs, Cajuns, among many others - was brought to Texas from every direction.

The music of American Indians, Anglo-Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and numerous immigrant groups-Germans, Czechs, Cajuns, among many others-was brought to Texas from every direction.

The Texas Music Office (TMO) is a state-funded business promotion office and information clearinghouse for . Barkley, Roy, Douglas E. Barnett, Cathy Brigham, Gary Hartman, Casey Monahan, Dave Oliphant, and George B. Ward, eds. (2003).

The Texas Music Office (TMO) is a state-funded business promotion office and information clearinghouse for the Texas music industry More than 14,000 individual clients use TMO resources and assistance each year, including more than 8,600 direct referrals to Texas music businesses, performers, and event planners. The TMO is the sister office to the Texas Film Commission, both of which are within the Office of the Governor.

The Austin Architest" is a monthly column written by Gordy Bowman in which Third Coast readers are asked to identify a curious detail of local architecture. In September 1984, Bowman presented his first "Super Architest," asking readers to identity a menage of existing downtown buildings.

Roy Barkley, Douglas E. Barnett, Cathy Brigham, Gary Hartman, Casey . The New Handbook Of Texas - ISBNdb (books and publications). Dave Austin Drums Craig Hoyer Keys Douglas Barnett Bass Nonda Trimis Percussion Special guest Lee Oskar on Harmonica

Roy Barkley, Douglas E. Barnett, Cathy Brigham, Gary Hartman, Casey Monahan, Dave Oliphant, George B. Ward. For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads. This comprehensive encyclopedia and biographical dictionary covers all aspects of Texas music documenting the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions. author: Douglas E. Barnett. Dave Austin Drums Craig Hoyer Keys Douglas Barnett Bass Nonda Trimis Percussion Special guest Lee Oskar on Harmonica. Canvas Ac Panel Douglas Barnett Mobile App. Duration

The stories of Texas music are as powerful as the music itself, and the Handbook of Texas Music tells those stories well.

Roy Barkley · Douglas E. Barnett · Gary Hartman · Casey Monahan · Dave Oliphant · George B. The Handbook of Texas Music. 978-0-87611-194-9 (0-87611-194-0). Roy Barkley · Douglas E.

Viii, 393 pages : 29 cm. "For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions in this state where east meets west.

For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions in this state where east meets west, southern plantations meet high plains ranches, and where an ethnically diverse American culture shares an international border with Mexico. The music of American Indians, Anglo-Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and numerous immigrant groups - Germans, Czechs, Cajuns, among many others - was brought to Texas from every direction. These groups crossed paths, and for centuries have been swapping songs and styles ranging from ancient fiddle tunes to lively polkas and boogie-woogie piano stomps.The Handbook of Texas Music tells a compelling story of music that deeply reflects the many distinctive groups that have created Texas music and used it as a means of entertainment, expression, solace, and identity. The recorded country blues of Blind Lemon Jefferson were so popular and influential in the 1920s that his name has come to represent all down-home bluesmen. Gene Autry's singing cowboy music on record and radio and his image on the silver screen and early television had a profound impact on the development of country music and the image of the cowboy in American life. Van Cliburn on stage in Moscow, where he won the Tchaikovsky Piano Competition during the depths of the Cold War, was an important moment in classical musical history and artistic diplomacy. Music pioneers Bob Wills and Milton Brown brought together the country string-band tradition with jazz, blues, pop, mariachi, and other styles, to help create Western Swing - an eclectic music that changed the face of country music, helped pave the way for rock-and-roll, and stands as a perfect symbol of the musical and cultural complexity of Texas.Scholars and music fans alike will be interested to learn about the many Texans - and Texas connections - found in music that has traveled far beyond the borders of the state. The rosters are long and impressive: country (George Jones, Johnny Horton, Jim Reeves, Buck Owens), blues (Gatemouth Brown, Albert Collins, Lightnin' Hopkins, Charles Brown), rock-and-roll (Roy Orbison, Bobby Fuller, Stevie Ray Vaughn, ZZ Top), jazz (Jack Teagarden, Eddie Durham, Oran "Hot Lips" Page, Ornette Coleman), musica Tejana (Narciso Martinez, Lydia Mendoza, Santiago Jimenez, Valerio Longoria, Selena). And the list goes on. Although the Handbook of Texas Music devotes separate biographical articles only to deceased musicians, important living artists such as Willie Nelson are treated in overview articles on topics such as "Country and Western Music," "Willie Nelson's Fourth of July Picnic," and others.
Comments: (2)
Kearanny
This is a very good book covering Texas Music History. However, I was disappointed at first, that it did not have an individual entry for "The Texas Tornados", ZZ Top, or even Billy Gibbons. So, I looked at the criteria used by the authors. They only gave individual entries to deceased musicians, at or around time of publishing the book in 2003. I do respect that, these deceased Texas musicians, deserve recognition, but I was hoping for more on all of Texas musicians, both living & deceased. So, if you're looking for Willie Nelson, there will be no entry for him, you'll have to look at the entry of "Country & Western Music", and there you'll find him, lumped in with other living C & W artists. As for ZZ Top, and The Texas Tornados, you have to go to the consolidated entry of "Rock & Roll in Texas". There you'll find ZZ Top, Johnny Winter, and the Texas Tornados, lumped in with other living rock & roll artists from Texas, at the time of publication. There is an individual entry for Doug Sahm (a founding member of the Texas Tornados), because he died in 1999. Plus, it does cover very briefly the "Texas Tornados" under Doug Sahm's entry.

So, in essense more information is provided on deceased Texas musicians, than on living ones. The entries that it does have, are very well presented, and full of information. It has great entries for Janis Joplin, Bob Wills, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Austin City Limits TV Show, Gilley's, Billy Bob's 7 acre night club in Fort Worth, Buddy Holly, Selena, and many, many others. These entries are well deserved. It is presented in alpabetical order, in encyclopedia style. Also, it has an index at the back of the book, which makes it easy to look up specific items. If equal exposure were given to living Texas musicians, I would have gladly given it a 5 star, because what it does cover, as individual entries, it covers very well.

The book does contain many great illustrations, and photos of Texas musicians from the past.

In conclusion, with all due respect to the dead, I am diappointed that equal exposure was not given to living Texas musicians, as opposed to deceased Texas musicians. However, overall, it is still a very, good reference book on Texas Music and well worth the purchase price. So, this is my assessment of the book, and I hope it will be helpful to potential buyers. Thanks!!!

Note: This book was published/copyrighted in 2003, by the Texas State Historical Society.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
By limiting coverage to deceased musicians, this otherwise interesting compendium excludes living all-time greats like Ray Price and Willie Nelson, as well as the incomparable George Jones, who passed away not long after publication.
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