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eBook A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South) epub

by Robert Oliver,Emmala Reed

eBook A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South) epub
  • ISBN: 1570035458
  • Author: Robert Oliver,Emmala Reed
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of South Carolina Press; illustrated Edition edition (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1994 kb
  • FB2 size 1654 kb
  • Formats mobi lit mbr rtf


Reed's postwar writings are particularly important given their rarity - many Civil War diarists stopped writing at war's end. As the daughter of Judge Jacob Pinckney Reed, a prominent lawyer, merchant, and prewar Unionist, Reed offers a perspective different from the usual ardent secessionist. than on a plantation or in an urban center. In her journals Reed captures the disheartening, chaotic period known as Presidential Reconstruction, the short span.

Emmala Reed was one of the few southern women who kept writing

Emmala Reed was one of the few southern women who kept writing. Emmala Thompson Butler Reed was born on June 11,1839, the daughter of Judge Jacob Pinckney Reed and Teresa Hammond Reed.

A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South).

A Faithful Heart book. Emmala Reed (1839-1893) may not have watched the unfolding of the Civil War from the front lines, but she nonetheless witnessed the collapse of the Confederacy. With the fall of Charleston and the burning of Columbia, waves of refugees flooded into her hometown of Anderson, South Carolina. Reed's postwar writings are particularly important given their rarity - many Civil War diarists stopped writing at war's end. A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South) chm. Emmala Reed. free download A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South) prc.

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Emmala Reed (1839-1893) may not have watched the unfolding of the Civil War from the front lines, but she nonetheless witnessed the collapse of the Confederacy

Emmala Reed (1839-1893) may not have watched the unfolding of the Civil War from the front lines, but she nonetheless witnessed the collapse of the Confederacy.

the journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866. Women's diaries and letters of the South.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove A faithful heart from your list? A faithful heart. the journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866. Published 2004 by University of South Carolina in Columbia.

In book: Kelvin, Thermodynamics and the Natural World, p. 25-433. A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 by Emmala Reed; Robert T. Oliver. January 2005 · The Journal of Southern History. Cite this publication. 30. University of Strathclyde. Do you want to read the rest of this chapter? Request full-text.

Emmala: Meaning of Emmala. A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866 (Women's Diaries and Letters of the South) by Robert T. Oliver and Emmala Reed (Sep 2004)

Emmala: Meaning of Emmala. What does Emmala mean? Everything name meaning, origin, pronunciation, numerology, popularity and more information about Emmala at NAMEANING. Oliver and Emmala Reed (Sep 2004). A Faithful Heart: The Journals of Emmala Reed, 1865 and 1866. by Tracy J. Revels (Nov 23, 2005).

Emmala Reed (1839-1893) may not have watched the unfolding of the Civil War from the front lines, but she nonetheless witnessed the collapse of the Confederacy. With the fall of Charleston and the burning of Columbia, waves of refugees flooded into her hometown of Anderson, South Carolina. Returning Confederate soldiers passed through this isolated settlement to get rations of cornmeal on their journey home, and eventually Union troops occupied the town. All the while this twenty-five-year-old, unmarried woman recorded what she observed from Echo Hall, her family home on Anderson's Main Street. Reed's journals from 1865 and 1866 present a detailed account of life in western South Carolina as war turned to reconstruction. Reed's postwar writings are particularly important given their rarity - many Civil War diarists stopped writing at war's end. As the daughter of Judge Jacob Pinckney Reed, a prominent lawyer, merchant, and prewar Unionist, Reed offers a perspective different from the usual ardent secessionist. than on a plantation or in an urban center. In her journals Reed captures the disheartening, chaotic period known as Presidential Reconstruction, the short span of time between the Confederate surrender and the beginnings of Congressional Reconstruction. She describes the apprehensions of people living in a relatively remote area at the war's end, the wide-eyed, end-of-the-war rumors that circulated throughout the South, and the steady procession of historically noteworthy people who moved through Anderson, many of whom visited her father at Echo Hall. Into her account of public travail Reed intertwines details about her private life. She depicts social engagements, religious events, and school activities while often recording her hope for the return of her longtime suitor. Adding a heart breaking twist to her chronicle, Reed writes candidly of her anguish and humiliation when, at last, he comes home only to marry another.
Comments: (3)
Visonima
She was an ancestor of mine. Enjoyed the book!!
Whitescar
I agree with the previous reviewer's comments. The book is fascinating. But, there are numerous errors by the editor in identifying my WEBB ancestors, many of which were easy to avoid/prevent with some diligent, focused attention to historical and genealogical detail and checking with and verifying sources. But, the book itself as a transcription of Emmala's heartfelt and perceptive journal is amazing and an historical treasure.
Kifer
Full disclosure - Emmala Reed was the sister of my great-great grandmother, Julia Susan Reed Brown. Aunt Emmala's reflections are fascinating. But, I am sorry about the inattention to detail on the part of the editor - such as listing my grandmother's name in the family tree as Catherine Helena Brown when her name was Caroline Helena Brown (Emmala refers to her as Carrie and that is how she was known as a girl - she was "Big Mama" to her own brood). In the family papers that my grandmother, Teresa Caroline Hammond Haltiwanger Cobb compiled, there is never any reference to her mother as Catherine. In the introduction, the names of the children of Jacob Pinckney Reed and Teresa Hammond Reed are given but, Julia Susan Reed's name simply appears as Susan. The average reader is not going to put two and two together to realize that Susan is really Julia. Julia Susan Reed was always known as Julia, and that is how her sister Emmala refers to her in her writings. I also wish the citations were more complete. For example, in the editorial there are assertions about the lineage of Jacob Pickney Reed but little information provided to allow researchers to pursue the documentation that led to the editor's conclusions. I hope that the mistakes in this publication do not get perpetuated. Just the same, I am grateful to have an intimate glimpse of my family.
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