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eBook The Jiangyin Mission Station: An American Missionary Community in China, 1895-1951 (The James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science) epub

by Lawrence D. Kessler

eBook The Jiangyin Mission Station: An American Missionary Community in China, 1895-1951 (The James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science) epub
  • ISBN: 0807850624
  • Author: Lawrence D. Kessler
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (April 22, 1996)
  • Pages: 228 pages
  • ePUB size: 1861 kb
  • FB2 size 1751 kb
  • Formats rtf azw lrf mobi


Lawrence Kessler uses the Jiangyin mission station in the Shanghai region of China to explore .

Lawrence Kessler uses the Jiangyin mission station in the Shanghai region of China to explore Chinese-American cultural interaction in the first half of the twentieth century. He concludes that the Protestant missionary movement was welcomed by the Chinese not because of the religious message it spread but because of the secular benefits it provided.

Lawrence Kessler uses the Jiangyin mission station in the Shanghai region of China to explore Chinese-American cultural .

Jiangyin Mission Station book Original Title

Jiangyin Mission Station book. Like other missions, Lawrence Kessler uses the Jiangyin mission station in the Shanghai region of China to explore Chinese-American cultural interaction in the first half of the twentieth century. The Jiangyin Mission Station: An American Missionary Community in China, 1895-1951 (James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science). 0807850624 (ISBN13: 9780807850626). Like other missions, the Jiangyin Station, which was sponsored by the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, North Carolina, combined evangelis. ONTINUE READING.

By Lawrence D. Kessler. Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996. Recommend this journal. Alan Richard Sweeten (a1). The Journal of Asian Studies.

Lawrence D. Kessler, The Jiangyin Mission Station: An American Missionary Community in China, 1895–1951 ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996 ), 158–9. In: American Radio in China. Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media. Ryan Dunch, Fuzhou Protestants and the Making of a Modern China, 1857–1927 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001). 150, 19. oogle Scholar. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Book Description: Describes an American missionary community in China during the years 1895-1905

Book Description: Describes an American missionary community in China during the years 1895-1905. eISBN: 978-1-68417-174-3. Subjects: History, Religion. The missionaries of this study were selected, sent to their missions, supported, and supervised by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM), an independent, self-perpetuating corporation under the laws of Massachusetts, with its home office in Boston. Although overwhelmingly Congregational in origin, inspiration, and support, it was officially free from denominational control. The Board had been in legal existence since 1812; it sent its first missionary to China in 1830.

The Jiangyin Mission Station. An American Missionary Community in China, 1895-1951. By Lawrence D. A Study of the Servants of William Cecil, Elizabethan Statesman. By Richard C. Barnett

The Jiangyin Mission Station. James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science. Published: April 1996. Charles N. Hunter and Race Relations in North Carolina. Published: April 1987. The Recruitment of Candidates in Mendoza Province, Argentina. By Richard R. Strout. Barnett. Published: November 2012.

Lawrence Kessler uses the Jiangyin mission station in the Shanghai region of China to explore Chinese-American cultural interaction in the first half of the twentieth century. He concludes that the Protestant missionary movement was welcomed by the Chinese not because of the religious message it spread but because of the secular benefits it provided. Like other missions, the Jiangyin Station, which was sponsored by the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, North Carolina, combined evangelism with social welfare programs and enjoyed a respected position within the local community. By 1930, the station supported a hospital and several schools and engaged in anti-opium campaigns and local peacekeeping efforts. In many ways, however, Christianity was a disruptive force in Chinese society, and Kessler examines Chinese ambivalence toward the mission movement, the relationship between missions and imperialism, and Westerners' response to Chinese nationalism. He also addresses the Jiangyin Station's close ties to, and impact upon, its supporting church in Wilmington.
Comments: (3)
Ytli
First, I should note that the description of this book on Amazon.com is clearly the wrong one, and Amazon should fix it.

Second, I commend this book to those who are looking for an understanding of the life and times of missionaries during this tumultuous time in China.

It's admittedly a little beyond the scope, but I wish the book had something more about the dynamics of the home churches during this time, as major events like the Depression were going on. As well, debates were heating up among Protestant congregations about the nature of foreign mission. Questions about both the purpose and methods of mission were active, and this was indeed a significant split amongst many of them. I have always wondered whether these trickled back to the missionaries.

It is difficult for me to read this book in a truly detached way. It so happens that my grandparents, who were in China from 1910 to after WWII, are featured prominently in this book, as this was their mission station in China. I am grateful for the extensive bibliography, which has helped me to trace many of their letters, although the location of the letters has changed since Kessler cited them (they are no longer at the Presbyterian Heritage Center at Montreat, as he indicates, but have been moved to the Historical Society in Philadelphia.) James Sprunt was also a dear friend and supporter of my grandparents: one of my aunts bore the (somewhat unfortunate) name of Sprunt as her middle name. I am so grateful to Lawrence Kessler for undertaking this work, and do recommend it to anyone who is looking for a representation of mission life in this heavily missionized country.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
An interesting and well written book for those who are interested in the Christian missionary presence in China. Well researched.
Kearanny
Far more is written about Christian missionaries from the North, especially New England, than from the South. The author attempts to redress some of this imbalance with this story of the Jiangyin Mission Station of the Southern Presbyterian Church near Shanghai, China. The home church of the Station was in Wilmington, NC which may make the book of especial interest to Carolinians.

The author has turned out a good academic history of the Station and the American missionaries who staffed it. Jiangyin began life with an anti-Christian riot -- the missionaries were accused of killng children to take their organs for medicine, an echo of the common rumors around the world today that Westerners kill children to steal their organs for transplant. Over the years the Mission was accepted by many in the Chinese community -- although converts were few and far between. The author includes maps and photos plus a lot of detail about how missionaries lived and worked. An especially good chapter details the trials and tribulations of the missionaries when Japan invaded the region in 1937 and, finally, forced the closing of Jiangyin on December 8, 1941. The Church opened Jiangyin after WW II, but it was closed permanently by the Chinese Communists in 1951. The history of Jiangyin is pretty typical of hundreds of Mission stations in China.

Well, this is a subject with a limited readership and -- however well done this book -- I have to wonder why academic books of such limited sales potential are not simply published on the web as ebooks and made available free to the general public. The author surely does not get rich off the royalties.

Smallchief
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