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eBook Winter Friends: Women Growing Old in the New Republic, 1785-1835 (Women in American History) epub

by Terri L. Premo

eBook Winter Friends: Women Growing Old in the New Republic, 1785-1835 (Women in American History) epub
  • ISBN: 0252016564
  • Author: Terri L. Premo
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press (November 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 199 pages
  • ePUB size: 1583 kb
  • FB2 size 1343 kb
  • Formats docx txt lrf mbr


Older women - United States - History - 18th century, Older women . Premo, Terri L. Women growing old in the new Republic.

Older women - United States - History - 18th century, Older women - United States - History - 19th century, Older women - United States - Social conditions, Old age - United States - History, Vrouwen, Bejaarden, Alter, Frau, Old age, Older women, Social conditions, Social Conditions - history, Women. Originally presented as the author's thesis under the title: Women growing old in the new Republic. Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-192).

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Terri L. Premo Aging and Its Discontents: Freud and Other Fictions. Kathleen Woodward," Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 18, no. 2 (Winter, 1993): 462-465. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

A spinster She's so old she graduated from a spinster to a thornback

This was quoted from her book "All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation" In Terri L. Permo's book "Winter Friends: Women Growing Old in the New Republic, 1785-1835," the author states, "While single women in their mid-twenties might be viewed with both 'alarm and pity,' a thirty-year-old New. England Spinster would be openly labeled a 'thornback. Often forced to rely on brothers and other relatives for support in late life, single women faced bleak prospects of dependency and financial insecurity. A spinster She's so old she graduated from a spinster to a thornback

Where are the women in the history of aging? Social Science History, 9, 429–452. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Winter friends: Women growing old in the new republic, 1785–1835.

Where are the women in the history of aging? Social Science History, 9, 429–452. Fischer, D. H. (1977). Growing old in America: The Bland-Lee lectures delivered at Clark University. New York: Oxford University Press. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Ritchie, D. A. (2003).

Winter Friends: Women Growing Old in the New Republic, 1785–1835. The impact of aging on the employment of men in American working-class communities at the end of the nineteenth century. University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Illinois. Ransom, R. L. and Sutch, R. 1995. In: Kertzer, and Laslett, op. ci. 303–327. Ransom, . Sutch, R. and Williamson, S. 1993.

This is a piece on history of women in the United States since 1776, and of the Thirteen Colonies before that

This is a piece on history of women in the United States since 1776, and of the Thirteen Colonies before that. The study of women's history has been a major scholarly and popular field, with many scholarly books and articles, museum exhibits, and courses in schools and universities. The roles of women were long ignored in textbooks and popular histories. By the 1960s, women were being presented as successful as male roles.

Many nineteenth-century women who recorded their life histories stressed the influence of grandmothers as models. 1990. Uhlenberg, Peter, and James B. Kirby. Grandparents of both genders expressed joy at the birth of grandchildren and followed their progress eagerly. Grandfathers as well as grandmothers corresponded frequently with grandchildren of all ages.

One of the few studies on old age which is based on personal documents, Terri L. Premo's Winter Friends: Women Growing Old in the New Republic, 1785-1835, shows that for many women in the United States in this period old age was rewarding and fruitful. Women's domestic sphere of feminine friendships was responsible for this positive experience: "most women who adopted the culture of domesticity and collaborated in the full range of feminine pursuits, as defined by woman's sphere, greeted old age with ease and serenity in the new republic. What is the significance of the study of personal documents for the history of the elderly?

Winter Friends examines the history of women growing old in the early United States through the use of primary sources (letters, journals, diaries, etc.). The book responds to two questions: what values gave meaning to these women as they grew old; and what roles did family, religion, female friendship, and tradition play in women's old age.
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