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eBook The Best of What We Are: Reflections on the Nicaraguan Revolution epub

by John Brentlinger

eBook The Best of What We Are: Reflections on the Nicaraguan Revolution epub
  • ISBN: 0870239856
  • Author: John Brentlinger
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (October 31, 1995)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1780 kb
  • FB2 size 1666 kb
  • Formats mbr doc azw rtf


The Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua inspired many North Americans, including the author of this moving and informative book. John Brentlinger made six trips to Nicaragua, both before and after the defeat of the Sandinista Party

The Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua inspired many North Americans, including the author of this moving and informative book. John Brentlinger made six trips to Nicaragua, both before and after the defeat of the Sandinista Party. Combining the insights of a philosopher with the experiences of a, he interprets the Sandinista period as a people's strug The Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua inspired many North Americans, including the author of this moving and informative book.

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The Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua inspired many North Americans, including the author of this moving and informative book. John Brentlinger made six trips in seven years to Nicaragua, most recently in 1991-2.

John Brentlinger made six trips in seven years to Nicaragua, most recently in 1991-2. In this volume he combines philosophy with reportage in portraying the Sandinista revolution as being less an economic and political phenomenon, than a human struggle for self-realisation.

JOHN BRENTLINGER’S UNIQUE book about the Nicaraguan experience combines three important qualities. First, the author displays an artistic attention to detail, describing persons and scenes in a delightful style which brings the reader into the middle of daily life in Nicaragua. Second, Brentlinger is steeped in the history and current politics of the country in which he has lived on six occasions over seven years, and his summaries and analysis are clear and accurate. Boarded up houses face the surf behind rows of coconut palms.

Author: John Brentlinger. We Are the Community.

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reflections on the Nicaraguan revolution. Personal impressions of Nicaraguan Revolution based on six trips over seven years. Standard internacionalista fare, apart from last chapter on years 1991-92 addressing some FSLN mistakes"-Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Brentlinger's book is an insightful portrayal of Sandinista Nicaraguans and solidarity activists John Brentlinger made six trips in seven years to Nicaragua, most recently in 1991-2.

Brentlinger's book is an insightful portrayal of Sandinista Nicaraguans and solidarity activists.

"Personal impressions of Nicaraguan Revolution based on six trips over seven years. Standard internacionalista fare, apart from last chapter on years 1991-92 addressing some FSLN mistakes"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.
Comments: (2)
Lanadrta
I have to strongly disagree with the previous reviewer. I have read the book twice now, and greatly appreciate it for its' ease of read, its insightful and critical analysis of Nicaraguan Sandinistas as well as progressive Americans visiting Nicaragua, and the fact that it covers the post-revolutionary period, for which there are very few books out there.

I always recommend this book to Americans who want to know more about the Sandinista Revolution, along with "My Car in Managua" by Forrest Colburn, Gioconda Belli's "The Country Under my Skin", and Ernesto Cardenal's "La Revolución Perdida". Belli and Cardenal formerly occupied top posts in the Sandinista Revolution, and are now dissidents of the FSLN, having joined the Sandinista Renovation Movement (MRS). Brentlinger and Colburn's books, on the other hand, both write their accounts as outsiders who did not occupy top leadership posts, but were committed to the revolutionary process.

"The Best of What we Are" is very hard to put down, yet it provides an excellent political and social analysis of the country, and is able to get to the heart of what the Sandinista Revolution meant for Progressive Nicaraguans and U.S. Citizens in solidarity with this Central American nation. "The Best of What we Are" has the added benefit of showing us how the revolution lives on after the FSLN's electoral defeat of 1990, in the work carried out by nationals and foreigners all over Nicaragua, in the institutions created or inspired by the 1980s revolution, and above all, in everyday examples of people transformed by this decade-long event.
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unmasked
I picked up this book while studying 20th century Central American history because I was interested in getting a personal account of a North American visiting Nicaragua during the period of Sandinista leadership. Brentlinger's work is certainly interesting, particularly his account of a visit to a campesino artist's colony, and I enjoyed reading about his interactions with his host family and locals in Managua and various villages he visited. However, the book is suffused with the kind of naive, the-Sandinistas-can-do-no-wrong tripe that so often populates accounts of Central America written by liberal white academics. Don't get me wrong, I'm as sympathetic towards the FSLN cause as anyone who has any idea of the pre-Revolution conditions that existed in Nicaragua, and yes, the knowledge of the Reagan and Bush administrations'involvement with the Contras leaves me less than proud to be an American citizen. However, the only way to avoid these kind of horrors in the future is to understand the whole story of what happened and why, and not fall back on knee-jerk reactionism. Understanding Central America means acknowledging that none of the various factions are blameless, even the Sandinistas. For a truly well written and insightful piece on this time and place, try Salman Rushdie's THE JAGUAR SMILE or, similarly, SALVADOR, Joan Didion's account of the Salvadoran killing fields.
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