» » Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class

eBook Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class epub

by Larry Tye

eBook Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class epub
  • ISBN: 0805070753
  • Author: Larry Tye
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st edition (July 6, 2004)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1943 kb
  • FB2 size 1701 kb
  • Formats lrf lit doc azw


Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.

Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon. Named a Recommended Book by The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, and The Seattle Times. Drawing on extensive interviews with dozens of porters and their descendants, Larry Tye reconstructs the complicated world of the Pullman porter and the vital cultural, political, and economic roles they played as forerunners of the modern black middle class. Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.

Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Rising from the Rails : Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class. Free delivery worldwide. A valuable window into a long-underreported dimension of African American history.

When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former .

When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistable. They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally doctor and undertaker to cars full of white passengers, making the Pullman Company the largest employer of African Americans in the country by the 1920s. Rising from the rails: Pullman porters and the making of the Black middle class.

Rising from the Rails book. Tye makes the case for the centrality of black Pullman (sleeping car) porters to the development of the black middle class, labour history, and the civil rights movement.

Interview with Larry Tye about Bobby Kennedy: The making of a liberal icon on NPR's Fresh Air with .

Interview with Larry Tye about Bobby Kennedy: The making of a liberal icon on NPR's Fresh Air with guest host Dave Davies. Interview with Larry Tye about Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend on NPR's Fresh Air with guest host Dave Davies. Interview with Larry Tye and Kitty Dukakis about Shock: The Healing Power of Electroconvulsive Therapy on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Interview with Larry Tye about Rising From the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Appearances on C-SPAN.

Remainder dot on bottom edges ISBN: 0805070753 (Pullman Porters, African Americans). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All).

An engaging social history that reveals the critical role Pullman porters played in the struggle for African American civil rights When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible. They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally doctor and undertaker to cars full of white passengers, making the Pullman Company the largest employer of African American men in the country by the 1920s.In the world of the Pullman sleeping car, where whites and blacks lived in close proximity, porters developed a unique culture marked by idiosyncratic language, railroad lore, and shared experience. They called difficult passengers "Mister Charlie"; exchanged stories about Daddy Jim, the legendary first Pullman porter; and learned to distinguish generous tippers such as Humphrey Bogart from skinflints like Babe Ruth. At the same time, they played important social, political, and economic roles, carrying jazz and blues to outlying areas, forming America's first black trade union, and acting as forerunners of the modern black middle class by virtue of their social position and income.Drawing on extensive interviews with dozens of porters and their descendants, Larry Tye reconstructs the complicated world of the Pullman porter, and provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.
Comments: (7)
Llathidan
Rising From The Rails tells an important story of the transition of black labor after the Civil War from slavery to freedom. After emancipation, African Americans looked for employment in a variety of venues. With the growth of railroads, George Pullman popularized a new travel experience--the sleeping car. Pullman instituted and combined a number of features that made rail travel luxurious--safety features, expanded car size, shock-absorbing wheels and "trained" personal attendants-- the porters. One of the most important aspects was the personal service offered by these porters. To recruit porters, Pullman drew heavily from the dark skinned former slaves of the Deep South. This was done because these newly freed men fulfilled many of stereotypes of the period that centered on docility and presumption of an inherent ability to provide personal service while being friendly and discreet.

This gave the ex-slaves and subsequent African American workers a degree of freedom of movement and economic opportunity heretofore unknown in this community. Though these jobs were some of the best available, they were at best a mixed blessing. The jobs were highly regimented with a strict, codified rule book covering nearly every eventuality. The smallest infraction could result in suspension and termination. This made for some tense times for the porters. The conditions though not as difficult as some agricultural pursuit were very challenging---long trips, long hours, minimal facilities for sleeping, dressing, etc.

Out of the need to establish more reasonable and equitable pay and working conditions, the porters under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph established the first black trade union in the United States. Through a number of strategies, the porters won recognition of their union with the Pullman Company and did improve the lot of their workers. The union also exerted national influence on a number of issues which served to expand opportunity for African Americans--desegregation of wartime industry.

A. Philip Randolph was the pioneer that proposed a March on Washington in the forties. Though the march never took place, the mere threat of the march got results. He subsequently served as the prime organizer of the actual March on Washington in 1968.

Many of the tactics which would be applied during the 1950s-1960s Civil Rights struggles were developed and tried by the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. These porters used their economic opportunities to strengthen their families and provide an avenue for many of their children to enter the middle class.

This is a wonderful story of the unique and important chapter in American and African American labor history. Tye tells the larger labor history as well as the significant personal stories of the porters which puts a human face on these struggles for equality.
Slowly writer
Larry Tye does a wonderful job of not only telling the story of the Pullman porters but also telling of the age in which they lived that includes a history of the railroad industry in America. He tells how Pullman Porters got by and what they did to survive. In several instances, he also shows how even though there was not always good blood between the white conductors and other white workers and the Pullman Porters, there were times when they had to work together.

For older African American readers the book is a trip down memory lane, allowing them to recall stories of fathers, realitives and family friends who were Pullman porters. For younger African Americans its a great lesson in history - and in a sense far more relevant than stories of how slaves got by. For White Americans its a look at how their grandparents and great grandparents looked at African Americans.

Included in the story of the Pullman porters is the story of A. Phillip Randolph and his sometimes lost story and his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

One of the important things that I came away from this book with was the legacy that that these men - and few women- passed on to their children and the number of significant African Americans who hold significant places in American life because of the hard work and savings of a Pullman Porter who took degredation so that their children could go to college.

This book should be required reading in every African American History class! It's readable and comprehensive.

On page nine there is one small error. Tye refers to a "lanky lawyer with whiskers from Springfield named Abraham Lincoln" who road the rails. Lincoln did not acquire his beard until after his election in 1860.
Ghile
Stretching across a tumultuous century, like a mighty steel trestle, Pullman porters bridged the racial, social and economic gap, from the emancipation of Negro slaves to a time when African Americans were making huge strides toward civil rights and equality. In his well-researched and skillfully-presented book, Larry Tye introduces us to the dichotomous, tenuously-balanced world of the Pullman porter, one in which he is both obsequious servant in his working role, and role model to his community. In a paradox of uncanny magnitude, George Pullman's ruthless and racist exploitation of his porters, in the end, served as a catalyst for the rise and progression of the modern civil rights movement. Moreover, his porters gained enough affluence to send their sons and daughters to colleges and universities. Tye introduces us to many unsung heroes of the early civil rights struggle, and shows the inextricable, symbiotic link forged between this movement and the Pullman porters. There are only a few surviving Pullman porters today. Thanks to Tye, their important legacy is preserved.
Erthai
If you love modern American social history you may love this book, so much of it in the actual words of the Pullman porters who experienced it. An amazing amount or research, it is apparent, went into it.
Mot
Rising From The Rails is such an incredible book that I am almost afraid to leave a review as I do not know if I can put into words how much I enjoyed it. For anyone interested in American History, Black History, the American railroad system etc. you cannot miss the opportunity to read this story. The details, history and stories that Larry Tye shared will touch such a wide range of emotions including anger, shock, respect and admiration. I have such a great respect for the amazing men that served the riders while working as Pullman Porters. I wish I could rate higher than 5 stars for the moving and mind-blowing experience offered by this read. I have actually purchased extra copies of the book to share with my friends and family. Thank you Mr. Tye!
Jake
Fascinating and quite readable. I was prompted to order it while watching a PBS doc.
Lots of good interesting historical tidbits.
eBooks Related to Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020