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eBook Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi: Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965 epub

by Staughton Lynd,James P. Marshall

eBook Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi: Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965 epub
  • ISBN: 0807149845
  • Author: Staughton Lynd,James P. Marshall
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: LSU Press; 1 edition (March 11, 2013)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1854 kb
  • FB2 size 1497 kb
  • Formats lrf rtf mobi doc


In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged this repressive racial . The ensuing social upheaval changed the state forever.

The ensuing social upheaval changed the state forever. In Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi, James P. Marshall, a former civil rights activist, tells the complete story of the quest for civil rights in Mississippi.

STUDENT ACTIVISM AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN MISSISSIPPI In 1960, Mississippi society still drew a sharp line between its African American and white communities. In the 1890s, the state had created a repressive racial system that ensured white supremacy by legally segregating black residents and removing their.

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By James P. Marshall. Foreword by Staughton Lynd. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013. Marshall confines his study to the developments that rocked Mississippi between 1960 and 1965. Marshall argues that the most dramatic and creative forms of protest politics came with the 1963 Freedom Vote, the decision to launch the massive Freedom Summer project in 1964, and the eventual creation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

Student activism and civil rights in Mississippi : protest politics and the struggle for racial justice, 1960-1965 James P. Marshall ; with a foreword by Staughton Lynd. Student activism and civil rights in Mississippi : protest politics and the struggle for racial justice, 1960-1965 James P. Rubrics: Civil rights movements Mississippi History 20th century Student movements African Americans Politics and government 20th century College students Political activity African American college students Civil rights.

Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi : Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965. by James P. In the 1890s, Mississippi society still drew a sharp line between its African American and white communities by creating a repressive racial system that ensured white supremacy by legally segregating black residents and removing their basic citizenship and voting rights. Over the ensuing decades, white residents suppressed African Americans who dared defy that system with an array of violence, terror, and murder.

James P. Marshall Previous: Between citizens and the state: the politics . .Library availability.

c2013 Previous: Between citizens and the state: the politics .

In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged this repressive racial .

In 1960, Mississippi society still drew a sharp line between its African American and white communities. In the 1890s, the state had created a repressive racial system that ensured white supremacy by legally segregating black residents and removing their basic citizenship and voting rights. Over the ensuing decades, white residents suppressed African Americans who dared challenge that system with an array of violence, terror, and murder. In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged this repressive racial order by encouraging African Americans to reassert the rights guaranteed them under the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. The ensuing social upheaval changed the state forever.

In Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi, James P. Marshall, a former civil rights activist, tells the complete story of the quest for civil rights in Mississippi. Using a voluminous array of sources as well as his own memories, Marshall weaves together an astonishing account of student protestors and local activists who risked their lives for equality, standing between southern resistance and federal inaction. Their efforts, and the horrific violence inflicted on them, helped push many non-southerners and the federal government into action, culminating in the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act―measures that destroyed legalized segregation and disfranchisement. Ultimately, Marshall contends, student activism in Mississippi helped forge a consensus by reminding the American public of its forgotten promises and by educating the nation that African Americans in the South deserved to live as free and equal citizens.

Comments: (3)
Геракл
I participated as a Northern student in civil rights work in Mississippi in the fall of 1963 and summer of 1964. I have read many accounts of what happened during that historic period. Marshall has added immeasurably to the literature. His book is engaging but also incredibly well documented. Much of it is based on interviews he did with key leaders in the struggle only a year or two after the events. He is careful to avoid concentrating too much on known leaders and discusses many people from the South who played critical roles, risking their lives, people who have been ignored by many more superficial accounts. This thoroughness is not just academically important. It brings home a fundamental truth: the struggle for civil rights in the 60's, like all struggles, relied on many, many people. It wasn't the miraculous outcome of the leadership of Martin Luther King or other famous people. Many other accounts emphasize the role of Northern students who went South. Marshall reminds us that it was Southern students who started the civil rights battle in the 60's and who took the most risks. Excellent work and well written.
Raniconne
While there are many histories of civil rights organizing in Mississippi, James Marshall adds a needed work to this field with this book. Most studies of civil rights organizing focus broadly on organizations like SNCC (Clayborne Carson's institutional history, for example) or more intensively on specific geographic areas or campaigns (Todd Moye on Sunflower County, or Raymond Arsenault on the Freedom Riders), but Marshall pursues a study of student organizing and protest in Mississippi that is both statewide and not limited to a single organization. He begins with the organizing of SNCC and how it was a critical and necessary step to bring white volunteers into the state to attract necessary media and federal attention, which organizers like Bob Moses realized despite the opposition of many of his fellow black SNCC veterans. Marshall is himself one of those white volunteers, but he recognizes that the involvement of whites had a detrimental effect on SNCC's stated goal of developing black political empowerment, as white volunteers would gravitate, often unconsciously, into leadership positions. The best chapters in the book deal with the development of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, the expression of grassroots black political empowerment in the state in the 1960s, a directly outgrowth of SNCC's activism. While moderates viewed the MFDP as a radical black power organization, the reality was that under the leadership of Lawrence Guyot, the party combined running black candidates for office with accepting compromises with the national Democratic Party, something that alienated SNCC activists. Marshall also examines attempts to organize white Mississippians during the civil rights movement through the White Folks' Project, an area that begs further study. All in all, this book adds excellent further analysis to established histories such as John Dittmer's Local People and supplements regional and local histories of movement organizing.
Risteacor
During the mid-1960's I spent 2 years as a staff lawyer with the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee in Mississippi. James Marshall has provided an excellent analysis of the reasons behind various critical events of the civil rights movement,both local and national.He has captured the significant role played by students while also emphasizing the important impact of courageous local African American citizens in the fight for equal justice. This book is a fascinating study for those interested in the watershed events of the '60's.
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