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eBook Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century epub

by Hal Rothman

eBook Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century epub
  • ISBN: 0415926122
  • Author: Hal Rothman
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (February 22, 2002)
  • Pages: 368 pages
  • ePUB size: 1586 kb
  • FB2 size 1816 kb
  • Formats doc rtf lrf docx


Las Vegas, Rothman tells us, represents socially sanctioned deviance

Las Vegas, Rothman tells us, represents socially sanctioned deviance. The deviance in "Neon Metropolis we expect to find, but Rothman delivers much more. Las Vegas enters the 21st century with poor educational infrastructure, a libertarian no-tax attitude making real long-term investment all but impossible, and a poorly educated workforce unequipped to handle the demands of new, 21st century industries. Ironically, Las Vegas may indeed be the "next Detroit" but in ways Dr. Rothman never envisioned. One person found this helpful.

Электронная книга "Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century", Hal Rothman

Электронная книга "Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century", Hal Rothman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Written in a style reminiscent of the works of Jack Kerouac, it tells a story of human ingenuity, creative energy, and wily resourcefulness set within a malleable urbane environment.

neon metropolis Neon Metropolis How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century Hal Rothman With Photographs by Virgil Hancock III Routledge New York, London Published in.

neon metropolis Neon Metropolis How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century Hal Rothman With Photographs by Virgil Hancock III Routledge New York, London Published i. How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century. With Photographs by Virgil Hancock III. Routledge.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-328) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-328) and index

Las Vegas, Rothman tells us, represents socially sanctioned deviance. The deviance in Neon Metropolis we expect to find, but Rothman delivers much more.

Las Vegas, Rothman tells us, represents socially sanctioned deviance. This is a book about changing American culture and the surprising ways that Las Vegas, which is different from the rest of America, reveals so much about the United States in a new century. - Richard White, Stanford University. Neon Metropolis is Hal Rothman's intellectual valentine to the city he loves.

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company. First some disclosure - I am acquainted with Hal Rothman in a professional capacity and I saw a couple of chapters before publication. Neon Metropolis is the best book I've read that explains the city I've lived in for nearly 3 years. Sure, it's easy to be ironic about Las Vegas and offer postmodern gobbledygook about what the city means. com User, October 29, 2002. - Richard White, Stanford University "Neon Metropolis is Hal Rothman's intellectual valentine to the city he loves.

Rothman Hal. Год: 2015. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. ISBN 10: 0-415-92613-0. ISBN 13: 9781317958529.

Neon Metropolis book. First published in 2003. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Neon Metropolis book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Comments: (7)
Watikalate
Rothman here lives in and is a fan of Vegas. So while his book is dry and analytical and has a scientific approach, his personal bias still shines through. If it's meant to be academic and analytical, lose the bias. If it's meant to be nostalgic or subjective, don't bore me with so many dry analytical details. His thesis that Vegas is a prototype for the 21st century city is highly amusing and inaccurate. Worst book I was forced to read for my history of US cities course. Other historic cities books were much more entertaining.
Arashigore
The late Dr. Rothman provided an interesting account of the rapid rise of Las Vegas. But viewed from a post-boom lens, many of the books' flaws stand out. Dr. Rothman was overly optimistic--the original thesis argued that Las Vegas was the new, service oriented Detroit. A mecca for good jobs for folks with only a high school education.

In post-boom Las Vegas, where unemployment is currently among the WORST of the nations' large metropolitan areas, the thesis is taking on water. Gaming alone could not sustain the boom. Rather, Vegas built a false boom, based on massive real estate speculation.

Gaming still provides some good paying jobs with a high school diploma, but the gaming industry cannot support long term growth. International competition from Macau and Singapore have catastrophically reduced high roller cash from Asia. Back home, more Americans are finally paying down two decades of accumulated credit card debt. Visitors still come to Vegas, but they gamble less, forcing resorts into rate cutting wars on room rates, entering into a dangerous downward cash flow spiral.

The fundamental flaw of Dr. Rothman's book was the failure to see that the boom of the last ten years was supported by real estate speculation, not gaming. Gaming could only grow so large. It's maxed out.

Now, Vegas must compete in a 21st century economy where education DOES matter, and where investment in educational infrastructure is key. Nevada now languishes while the East Coast cities, with far greater educational resources, prosper. Further, Vegas suffers from a very low tax base. Gaming was allowed to pull all the weight. It cannot do that any longer...the endlessly growing revenues have flat lined. Raising taxes in a city whose populace was used to paying virtually none, is proving all but impossible, and the city languishes.

Las Vegas enters the 21st century with poor educational infrastructure, a libertarian no-tax attitude making real long-term investment all but impossible, and a poorly educated workforce unequipped to handle the demands of new, 21st century industries.

Ironically, Las Vegas may indeed be the "next Detroit" but in ways Dr. Rothman never envisioned.
Delan
One of the central theses of this book is that Las Vegas has miraculously "adopted" to the changing economy and has thus prospered more than other major U.S. cities by taking advantage of emerging social and economic trends. The author imagines that Las Vegas is some sort of highly malleable economic miracle machine that rolls with the punches, survives and prospers hugely while other places dependant on more recession-sensitive industries such as technology, manufacturing, and medical research ebb and flow. What nonsense!
Las Vegas, and to an even greater extent its cradle of growth Clark County, have never adopted to ANY emerging economic trend, unless you count the undesirable trend of industrial-scale gaming penetration together with huge resort casinos into every corner of the city, including formerly-protected residential neighborhoods. Quite the contrary, the city has never done anything other than repackage marketing themes that sell gambling and an increasingly aggressive sex industry, advertisements for which pervade just about available public space one views from an automobile. Hide you eyes, kids!
Las Vegas' economic success is certainly not based on economic malleability and adaptability. It is based on 30 years worth of cheap housing, abundant low wage jobs, weak consumer protection, and almost non-existent restraints on development of raw land. Throw in a state and a county government run for the benefit of the gaming industry and developers and voila! The "city of the future", is a vast wasteland of cookie-cutter housing tracts, endless strip malls, and a urban facade often described as "franchise architecture". This is not my vision of a desirable future. And increasingly, many observers in southern Nevada are beginning to realize that Las Vegas is rapidly becoming unlivable due to the city's rush into this future.
For those who have not moved to this place yet, let's hope that Las Vegas is not the future of American urban life, but will remain what is has always been: an aberration maintained solely by unrestrained growth and legalized gambling.
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