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eBook The Seven Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week epub

by Eviatar Zerubavel

eBook The Seven Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week epub
  • ISBN: 0226981657
  • Author: Eviatar Zerubavel
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (March 15, 1989)
  • Pages: 220 pages
  • ePUB size: 1688 kb
  • FB2 size 1112 kb
  • Formats mbr txt lit azw


Eviatar Zerubavel is professor of sociology at Rutgers University. His books include Hidden Rhythms: Schedules and Calendars in Social Life and Patterns of Time in Hospital Life: A Sociological Perspective.

Eviatar Zerubavel is professor of sociology at Rutgers University.

by. Zerubavel, Eviatar.

The Seven Day Circle book. But where the week exists-and there have been many cultures where it doesn't-it is so "Days, months, and years were given to us by nature, but we invented the week for ourselves.

Days, months, and years were given to us by nature, but we invented the week for ourselves. But where the week exists-and there have been many cultures where it doesn’t-it is so deeply embedded in our experience that we hardly ever question its rightness, or think of it as an artificial convention; for most of us it is a matter of ’second nature.

The original seven-day planetary week is the third and final piece of the puzzle proving that Saturday is not the Bible Sabbath, nor . Sunday was originally the second day of the planetary week and was known as dies Solis.

The original seven-day planetary week is the third and final piece of the puzzle proving that Saturday is not the Bible Sabbath, nor Sunday the first day of the Biblical week. This transformation took several hundred years. The third day of the week was dies Lunæ (day of the Moon – Monday).

The ordinary seven-day week now had a new bedfellow: the nepreryvka, or continuous working week. It was five days long, with days of rest staggered across the week. Now, the Soviet economist and politician Yuri Larin proposed, the machines need never be idle. It’s quite possible, argues Eviatar Zerubavel, sociologist and author of The Seven Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week, that the calendar reform tied into a traditional Marxist aversion toward the family. Making family units less integrated may even have been a conscious part of the agenda.

Days, months, and years were given to us by nature, but we invented the week for ourselves

Days, months, and years were given to us by nature, but we invented the week for ourselves. But where the week exists-and there have been many cultures where it doesn't-it is so deeply embedded in our experience that we hardly ever question its rightness, or think of it as an artificial convention; for most of us it is a matter of 'second nature. The Seven Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week. واسطة Eviatar Zerubavel‏.

There is nothing inevitable about a seven-day cycle, or about any other kind of week; it represents an arbitrary rhythm .

But where the week exists-and there have been many cultures where it doesn't-it is so deeply embedded in our experience that we hardly ever question its rightness, or think of it as an artificial convention; for most of us it is a matter of 'second nature.

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"Days, months, and years were given to us by nature, but we invented the week for ourselves. There is nothing inevitable about a seven-day cycle, or about any other kind of week; it represents an arbitrary rhythm imposed on our activities, unrelated to anything in the natural order. But where the week exists—and there have been many cultures where it doesn't—it is so deeply embedded in our experience that we hardly ever question its rightness, or think of it as an artificial convention; for most of us it is a matter of 'second nature.'
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