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eBook Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898 epub

by Katherine Hirschfeld

eBook Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898 epub
  • ISBN: 0765803445
  • Author: Katherine Hirschfeld
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (December 13, 2006)
  • Pages: 274 pages
  • ePUB size: 1504 kb
  • FB2 size 1187 kb
  • Formats doc lrf lrf docx


Katherine Hirschfeld became interested in Cuba in the mid-1990s, after reading numerous laudatory books and articles describing the Castro regime's achievements in health and medicine.

Katherine Hirschfeld became interested in Cuba in the mid-1990s, after reading numerous laudatory books and articles describing the Castro regime's achievements in health and medicine. Cuba's population health indicators seemed to be far superior to those of neighboring countries, the national health costs low, and medical care free at point-of-service to the entire people. Historical records indicated that most of these positive health trends resulted from the changes instituted by Castro in 1959. Few of these authors, however, had actually spent time on the island. Katherine Hirschfeld.

Hirschfeld, Katherine 2006 Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba .

Hirschfeld, Katherine 2006 Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898 Transaction Publishers. ISBN-10 0765803445 ISBN-13 978-0765803443. This book an essential and valuable resource for those who wish to study the Cuban health system. Those critics who point out that the data has gaps, might well consider the difficulties found when trying to retrieve such information from Cuba; plus, one should keep in mind that presenting such flaws in health services is anathema to supporters of the Cuban government. If you think this book PROVES that Cuba's medical system fails SO FAR AS objective indicators are concerned, then you've misread it.

Hirschfeld also discusses widespread sociolismo in Cuba’s health care system. Laura Ymayo Tartakoff is adjunct associate professor of political science at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where she teaches courses on dictatorship and democracy in Latin America and on aspects of constitutional law.

provided Katherine Hirschfeld the opportunity to experience health care in Cuba from the patient’s standpoint

The misfortune of contracting dengue, while doing fieldwork for her doctoral thesis, provided Katherine Hirschfeld the opportunity to experience health care in Cuba from the patient’s standpoint. Briefly put, Hirschfeld arrived in late 1996, enthusiastic and positively inclined, with plans to spend a year in Santiago exploring Cuba’s achievements in social medicine, and left, 7 months later, seriously questioning them. Her opinion underwent a dramatic transformation. In many ways, Cuban justice and egalitarianism turned out to be fables

Katherine Hirschfeld became interested in Cuba in the mid-1990s, after reading numerous laudatory books and articles describing the Castro regime's achievements in health and medicine. ISBN13: 9780765803443.

Hirschfeld, Katherine. Bibliographic Citation. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 2007. No One Left Abandoned": Cuba's National Health System Since the 1959 Revolution . De Vos, Pol (2005). Related Items in Google Scholar.

Katherine Hirschfeld. Taylor & Francis Ltd (Sales). Walmart 9781412808637. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898.

eISBN13 9781351516105. More Books . ABOUT CHEGG.

Katherine Hirschfeld, Health, Politics, and Revolution. the opportunity to experience health care in Cuba from the. patient’s standpoint. This is highly unusual testimony, and. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2006.

Challenging many of the assumptions scholars have made about the Cuban Revolution's impact on healthcare, this volume recounts one anthropologist's quest to discover the truth behind the complicated relationship between Cuba's revolution, politics, and healthcare system. Katherine Hirschfeld became interested in Cuba in the mid-1990s, after reading numerous laudatory books and articles describing the Castro regime's achievements in health and medicine. Cuba's population health indicators seemed to be far superior to those of neighboring countries, the national health costs low, and medical care free at point-of-service to the entire people. Historical records indicated that most of these positive health trends resulted from the changes instituted by Castro in 1959. Few of these authors, however, had actually spent time on the island. Thus, Hirschfeld found that academic writing on Cuba was often long on praise, but short on empirical research about what exactly had changed in Cuban medicine since 1959.

After much bureaucratic wrangling, Hirschfeld managed to secure permission to conduct long-term ethnographic research in Cuba, where she lived with families from Havana and Santiago, conducted clinic observations, interviewed doctors and patients, and was treated in a Cuban hospital during an epidemic of dengue fever. The reality of the Cuban healthcare system turned out to be different than the scholarly ideal: it was bureaucratized, authoritarian, and repressive, and most people preferred to seek healthcare in the informal economy rather than endure the material shortages, red tape, and political surveillance of the public sector. Written in the form of a first-person narrative, Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898 not only critically reevaluates Cuban healthcare after the 1959 revolution; it includes chapters detailing Cuban health trends from the Spanish-American War (1898) through the fall of Fulgencio Batista in 1959 and into the present.

Comments: (6)
Hellmaster
Hirschfeld, Katherine 2006 Health, Politics, and Revolution in Cuba Since 1898 Transaction Publishers. ISBN-10 0765803445 ISBN-13 978-0765803443

This book an essential and valuable resource for those who wish to study the Cuban health system. Those critics who point out that the data has gaps, might well consider the difficulties found when trying to retrieve such information from Cuba; plus, one should keep in mind that presenting such flaws in health services is anathema to supporters of the Cuban government. This is true not only in Cuba, where jail terms reward for dissemination of such, but also outside of Cuba where attempts to suppress unfavorable information on this matter also exist. For instance mention of this book has been banned from discussion in Wikipedia. What ever the barriers, this book clearly demonstrates the many flaws in the Cuban Health system, and the large gap between the commonly perceived and reality of health services in Cuba.
Kigabar
A lucid analysis of Public Health in Cuba since 1898, including a first-hand experience of the system during the author's close-to-one-year stay in the island. A powerful document that helps to dispel the myth that Public Health is one of the major accomplishments of Castro's regimen, and uncovers how a police, terror-driven state works.
Spilberg
This a very good FIRST-PERSON and QUALITATIVE ethnographic study, but that's all it is. No doubt, the book will enrage Castro's regime and will equally make those ideologically opposed to that regime giddy with joy. If, however, your interest is an objective attempt to acquire quantitative data recording the actual changes in health-indicators since 1898, this book is absolutely useless. The author confines herself to a very small sample of the population, makes no attempt whatsoever to determine if that sample is biased in anyway, and only records qualitative data of admittedly interesting, but often incredibly ambiguous character.

If you think this book PROVES that Cuba's medical system fails SO FAR AS objective indicators are concerned, then you've misread it. If, however, you think the book gives us SOME REASON to worry about BIOMEDICAL ETHICS in Cuba, then you will find some evidence. However, since that evidence is not quantitative, but anecdotal, it's impossible to determine how widespread or deep the relevant problem is.

Too often, the author get's carried away and draws deeply implausible inferences from highly exiguous and problematic data. As a result, the book is sometimes much too partisan and ideological - i.e., subjective - to be helpful. It's at its best when it sticks to particular facts and details and does not try to draw larger inferences.

When reading this books, it helps to keep in mind the author's VERY OWN assessment of health-care in Cuba AFTER she wrote this book:
"Health is an important human right. And the Cuban model of primary health care has been extremely successful in extending access to health services to the Cuban population and in improving population health indicators. These achievements, however, should not blind researchers to the grave absence of human rights in other aspects of Cuban life. Health is important, but so are privacy, personhood, personal autonomy, free speech, freedom from arbitrary arrest, freedom to travel abroad voluntarily, the ability to peacefully protest injustices or inequalities, and the right to simply be politically disengaged." - Katherine Hirschfeld (Society, May 2009, pg. 296)

Obviously, just because healthcare in Cuba has improved various objective measures of health, it does not follow that the Cuban regime is unimpeachable or not extremely repressive in other regards. On the other hand, how "free speech," "freedom from arbitrary arrest," "freedom to travel abroad and peacefully protest" are supposed to bear importantly on the efficacy of the healthcare system is rather beyond me? Confusing the restriction of those political liberties with the quality of healthcare seems to involve the same fallacious sleight-of-hand and rhetorical trickery that the Cuban government itself is so adept at.
Hinewen
Fair disclosure: this book was written by my spouse, though before we were married. I believe my comments are honest, but the reader should consider them with our present relationship in mind. My impressions of Dr. Hirschfeld's observations were influenced by cultural exchanges I participated in long before to the Soviet Union and the Peoples' Republic of China, both under similar corrupted communist regimes as Cuba, and which held very non-socialist two-tier healthcare systems; one for the upper strata and ranking military--excellent--and another--woefully inadequate--for the common people. The high ideals of early communism were abandoned under all three systems.

Thankfully Dr. Hirschfeld's book holds no dry academic wringing of statistics (what there are in Cuba are suspect), nor is this a puff-piece written by a naive visitor shepherded to inauthentic clinics-for-show or to hospitals for foreigners or the ruling elite. The fascinating heart of this book is the year Dr. Hirschfeld spent in Cuba under the radar as a simple visitor. She arrived in Cuba anticipating confirmation of the prevailing academic view that life and health care under the Marxist system was a model of excellence. She soon experienced an epiphany as she witnessed the reality of living under the Castro regime: widespread shortages, petty humiliations, harassments, official doublespeak, and, contrary to expectations, regrettably poor health care for average citizens. This was not merely an impression: she became ill (only later did she learn she had contracted dengue fever) and was whisked away to an isolation ward in which she and other women suffering from the painful disease (also called break-bone fever) were kept as virtual prisoners. They received no diagnosis, no medication, and lived under conditions unimaginable in first-world nations. Despite her suffering, the author will no doubt long remember the tribulations, camaraderie, good humor, and indomitable spirit of the workaday Cuban patients suffering alongside her. She, and the world, later learned there had been a widespread epidemic of dengue though it had been denied by the regime. The reality was leaked by a courageous Cuban physician who was jailed for revealing the truth.

The second half of the book is a revisionist history of twentieth century health care in Cuba "intended to critique the conventional portrayal . . . by the Castro regime and by Marxist scholars in the United States." It begins with the War of Independence (1898) until the Castro revolution (1959) and explores the effect of economic and political factors such as the relationship between poverty and health, the availability of safe water and sanitation under various regimes, and the effects of corruption and violence on the nation's health.
Tojahn
It's concise, well-written, and it details the author's involvement with the events that helped pull the wool out from people's eyes over the situation in Cuba.
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