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eBook Jefferson Davis, Confederate President epub

by Richard E. Beringer,Herman Hattaway

eBook Jefferson Davis, Confederate President epub
  • ISBN: 0700611703
  • Author: Richard E. Beringer,Herman Hattaway
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas; First Edition edition (June 13, 2002)
  • Pages: 576 pages
  • ePUB size: 1881 kb
  • FB2 size 1183 kb
  • Formats rtf mbr lrf txt


Jefferson Davis, Confederate President. Letters from Forest Place. Army, Correspondence, Generals, Geschichte, Historiography, In library, Internet Archive Wishlist, Kriegführung, Military weapons, Militär, Miscellanea, Plantation life, Politics and government, Presidents, Sezessionskrieg (1861-1865), Social aspects.

By Herman Hattaway and Richard E. Beringer. Likewise, the new work by historians Herman Hattaway and Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President, could well be titled Davis at War. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2002. Whatever the title may imply, Hattaway and Beringer have delivered neither a year-by-year portrayal of the Confederacy's chief executive nor a narrowly focused political analysis of Davis's ill-fated presidency. Instead, the authors provide a vivid portrait of the man, the office, and the southern nation during the star-crossed struggle for independence.

Jefferson Davis, Confederate President. Herman Hattaway and Richard E. He was one of the most embattled heads of state in American history. Charged with building a new nation while waging a war for its very independence, he accepted his responsibilities reluctantly but carried them out with a fierce dedication to his ideals. It is a fine, well-written study and one of the most useful analyses of the Confederate leadership to appear in several years.

com: Jefferson Davis, Confederate President: Clean, bright & tight copy with dj protected in archival-quality mylar. Now two renowned Civil War historians, Herman Hattaway and Richard Beringer, take a new and closer look at Davis's presidency.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Richard E Beringer books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Jefferson Davis, Confederate President.

Find nearly any book by Richard E. Beringer by Richard E. Beringer, Herman Hattaway, Archer Jones, William N. Still J. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Richard E. Still Jr. ISBN 9780820310763 (978-0-8203-1076-3) Hardcover, University of Georgia Press, 1989. Jefferson Davis, Confederate President: ISBN 9780700612932 (978-0-7006-1293-2) Softcover, University Press of Kansas, 2002.

President Jefferson Davis met with his Confederate Cabinet for the last time on May . Beringer, Richard . Hattaway, Herman, Jones, Archer, and Still, William . Jr. (1986). Why the South Lost the Civil War.

President Jefferson Davis met with his Confederate Cabinet for the last time on May 5, 1865, in Washington, Georgia, and the Confederate government was officially dissolved. The meeting took place at the Heard house, the Georgia Branch Bank Building, with 14 officials present. Davis' reputation in the South was restored by the book and by his warm reception on his tour of the region in 1886 and 1887. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Jefferson Davis (born Jefferson Finis Davis; June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as the President of the Confederate States . Hattaway, Herman and Beringer, Richard E. (2002).

Jefferson Davis (born Jefferson Finis Davis; June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as the President of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1865. He was a member of the Democratic Party who represented Mississippi in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives prior to becoming president of the Confederacy. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.

Jefferson Davis and His Cabinet, 2014. Rable, George . The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics, 1994. Hattaway, Herman and Richard E. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 2002. Resch, John P. et a. Americans at War: Society, Culture and the Homefront vol 2: 1816-1900 (2005). Hattaway, Herman, and Richard E. 2001), scholarly study of war years. Rable; George C. The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics.

He was one of the most embattled heads of state in American history. Charged with building a new nation while waging a war for its very independence, he accepted his responsibilities reluctantly but carried them out with a fierce dedication to his ideals. Those efforts ultimately foundered on the shoals of Confederate defeat, leaving Davis stranded in public memory as both valiant leader and desolate loser.Now two renowned Civil War historians, Herman Hattaway and Richard Beringer, take a new and closer look at Davis's presidency. In the process, they provide a clearer image of his leadership and ability to handle domestic, diplomatic, and military matters under the most trying circumstances-without the considerable industrial and population resources of the North and without the formal recognition of other nations.Hattaway and Beringer examine Davis's strengths and weaknesses as president in light of both traditional evidence and current theories of presidential leadership. They show us a man so respected that northern colleagues regretted his departure from the U.S. Senate, but so bent on Southern independence he was willing to impose unthinkable burdens on his citizens-an apologist for slavery who was committed to state rights, even while growing nationalism in his new country called for a stronger central government.In assessing Davis's actual administration of the Confederate state, the authors analyze the Confederate government's constitution, institutions, infrastructure, and cabinet-level administrators. They also integrate events of Davis's presidency with the ongoing war as it encroached upon the South, offering a panoramic view of military strategy as seen from the president's office. They tell how Davis reacted to the outcomes of key battles and campaigns in order to assess his leadership abilities, his relations with civilian and military authorities, and—his own personal competency notwithstanding—his poor judgment in selecting generals.Rich in detail and exhilaratingly told with generous selections from Davis's own letters and speeches, Hattaway and Beringer provide the most insightful account available of the first and only Confederate presidency-suggesting that perhaps it was the Confederate government, rather than Davis himself, that failed. More than that, it shows us Jefferson Davis as an American leader and offers a new appreciation of his place in our country's history.
Comments: (4)
Knights from Bernin
I had never thought about there being a Southern President--it was always Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincoln---super good book
Moogura
This book focuses on the Confederate Presidency of Jefferson Davis and is not meant to be a full biography. However it is fascinating and is very informative regarding the incredible challenges faced by Jefferson Davis. The task of serving as the first President of the Confederacy was a challenge of great magnitude since it involved setting up governmental infrastructure in the Southern states as well as conducting a war with the Union states. The most interesting aspect of the book was that the dynamics that caused the southern states to break from the union were the same dynamics that created barriers in creation of a new Confederacy. Suspicion of a central government, concern over state's rights, and rising tension between slave owners and non-owners all undermined the ability to coordinate and compress a government that could withstand the blows of the more powerful Northern Union. Everything seemed to eventually work against the stability of the Confederate government including a legislative branch that could undermine the strength of the Confederate government due to ideology around state's rights. It is a very interesting read. Davis was an incredible person to withstand such amazing set-backs and hardships and I grew to appreciate what an almost impossible task he faced. The governors of Georgia and North Carolina were such hard-line state's rights advocates that they continually presented barriers to establishing a solid government or to conduct the war. The book was realistic in telling of the growing dissatisfaction among the citizens of the South in regard to the Confederate government and to the course of the war. The book is long and detailed, but gives a balanced view. The authors use a model of Presidential leadership based on whether the President was focused on solving problems or not and whether the President naturally enjoyed the struggles. They identify Davis as both active and negative in that he worked tirelessly to solve problem after problem but that he became joyless and exhausted by the struggle, became more pessimistic, and had difficulty renewing his emotions and spirit. This seemed like a fair analysis given the incredible hurdles history threw at this man. I recommend the book and found it insightful.
Yainai
Do not be confused by the title for this book is not a biography of Jefferson Davis. It is a biography of the Confederate government with Davis at the helm. There is some new information to be found in this book but not much and unfortunately most of the new information will be found in the form of a psychological profile of Davis. Of course the reader will find a few tidbits of interest such as the price the government would pay in certain parts of Georgia for sweet potatoes. Sadly, that is about the most interesting bit of new information one will find and one will have to persevere to get to that information for the writing is dry as dust.
In fact, most of the information in this book comes from William Davis and William Cooper who have written excellent studies on both Davis and his era. To the authors' credit they don't try to hide this fact as again and again they openly repeat what Davis and Cooper have written. The sad but true conclusion I have come to is that one would be far better off to buy books written by William Davis and William Cooper. I have read both authors and their writing is much more clear and to the point than anything that will be found in this book. The only parts of this book I really found interesting dealt with the operation of the Confederate congress. On this book's strength on that subject alone I have to give this book three stars although two were a distinct possibility. Quite frankly, I get the feeling that the authors' ego may have gotten the best of them as they wrote this book. If they will stop trying to impress the boys at Harvard and Vanderbilt these two gentlemen could do much to further the study of the Confederacy. When not quoting W. Davis or W. Cooper their research is first rate but they have got to loosen up and have fun with their work. Then maybe their readers will be able to enjoy their subject as much as the authors have.
Brightcaster
I thought this book was absolutely fascinating and I couldn't put it down. One of the first books that I have read totally from the Confederate Government perspective, from the forming of this new nation, the congress, the financing, the maintenance of a huge army, impressment, conscription, the confederate constitution, the money, the battles, the wins and losses, and, oh, yes, the President of the confederacy, Jefferson Davis. Great book.
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