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eBook Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster epub

by Melissa Fay Greene

eBook Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster epub
  • ISBN: 015602957X
  • Author: Melissa Fay Greene
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvest Books (May 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • ePUB size: 1322 kb
  • FB2 size 1935 kb
  • Formats lit lrf lit rtf


Last Man Out" concerns two very different stories and issues.

Last Man Out" concerns two very different stories and issues. The first involves a coal mine collapsing in October 1958 in Springhill, Nova Scotia, the media circus that it attracted, the nervous anticipation of the families, and the struggles of two groups of survivors as they wait for days deep in the mine to be rescued. The second story and issue takes the reader from Canada to down south in Georgia where the survivors who were trapped were invited to vacation-the brainstorm of a PR agent who hoped to attract more tourism to the state.

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Melissa Fay Greene's books, Praying for Sheetrock and The Temple Bombing, were National Book Award finalists, winning numerous other awards. Greene has written for the New Yorker, Newsweek, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, and Life. She lives in Atlanta.

In 2003 Melissa Fay Greene wrote Last Man Out: the Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster, a riveting biographical reconstruction based on survivor interviews

In 2003 Melissa Fay Greene wrote Last Man Out: the Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster, a riveting biographical reconstruction based on survivor interviews A 2014 fictionalized novel by Cheryl McKay, Song of Springhill – A Love Story: An Inspirational Romance Based on Historical Events relates to the 1958 bump.

A strikingly told story of a Canadian mining catastrophe. MELISSA FAY GREENE’s books, Praying for Sheetrock and The Temple Bombing, were National Book Award finalists

A strikingly told story of a Canadian mining catastrophe. In 1958, in the prettily named Springhill, Nova Scotia, a rush of subterranean energy compressed the deep chambers of the town's coal mine. The Thunder of Baritones. MELISSA FAY GREENE’s books, Praying for Sheetrock and The Temple Bombing, were National Book Award finalists. Greene has written for the NewYorker, Newsweek, the NewYork Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, and Life. Библиографические данные. Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster.

Greene discovered the records of the forgotten drama of the 1958 fatal journey of the miners of Springhill, Nova . Springhill, Nova Scotia. At 8:06 pm, the deepest coal mine in North America yielded to pressure from the earth's core and burst apart.

Greene discovered the records of the forgotten drama of the 1958 fatal journey of the miners of Springhill, Nova Scoti. Subterranean collisions shook the town, registered in distant cities as an earthquake, and upset ships at sea. 175 miners were trapped a vertical mile underground. Volunteer rescuers fought down into a maelstrom of gas and coal-dust, and found a dozen survivors. Then no one else came out. Ambulances and hospitals stood waiting; where were the injured? Days passed.

This book describes the following items: Springhill Mine Disaster, Springhill, . 1958, Download more by: Melissa Fay Greene.

Last Man Out is an engaging and compelling story about the Springhill mine disaster, in which 75 miners perished. Miraculously, two groups of trapped miners survived underground for almost a week before being rescued.

Аудиокнига "Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster", Melissa Fay Greene. Читает Henry Strozier. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

One evening in late October 1958, the deepest coal mine in North America "bumped"-its rock floors heaved up and smashed into rock ceilings. Most of the men on the shift perished. But nineteen men were trapped alive a mile below the earth's surface, struggling to survive without food, water, light, or fresh air. Almost a week passed without rescue. Hopes of finding life dwindled; then a miracle happened: Rescuers stumbled across a broken pipe that led to the cave of survivors. In the media circus that followed, the survivors' endurance was mythologized and twisted, and the state of Georgia's tourism ploy-inviting the survivors to recuperate on a Georgia beach-turned racist and pitted the miners against each other. Using long-lost stories and interviews with survivors, Greene has reconstructed an extraordinary drama of their struggle and miraculous rescue.
Comments: (7)
Arith
The basic facts of this book's content - the event surrounding the Spring Hill Mine rescue have been covered in other reviews and I will not waste time rehashing them yet again. Instead I would like to focus upon the less obvious gems within this book that in my opinion transend the amzing story of survival.

Melissa Green takes the reader on a journey not just into a coal mine, but into life in this working class town in 1958. The families, the marriages and the race relations all form a familiar image for those who like myself lived in or near the same time frame(in my case as a child) except that this book provided me an understanding of my parent's world. While my father wasn't a miner or ever a manual laborer nevertheless the men of the mine matched up with faces and families of those I grew up with in a world long lost to history. Of solid men who took care of their families, saved, and yet know how to have fun.

Beyond that personal appeal the medium of the story takes us with the trapped men and allows us to expereince their empotions. Somehow inspite of the fact we know it is coming the disaster seems as fresh and unexpected as it was to the men who also knew that some day there would be the "big one" and prayed they wouldn't be inside when it happened.

The aftermath leaves the reader choking on coal dust and shaken by the sight of crushed men whom they have just gotten to know. Unlike some writers the author doesn't pretty it up and the all the horror and mental trauma of the men is ours to share. We also share through the men's thoughts, thoughts of children and the future they now realize they will never see, thoughts of wives whom they will never hold and the constant and never ending question of what will it be like when death comes? Like so many of us who take life's little pleasures for granted, this disaster brings into focus for these trapped and dying men the value of those things and people they took for granted.

Lie in the coal black mine on a bed of broken rock while thirst unlike anything you have ever known treatens to drive you out of your mind. Realize your pants can't stay up because you've lost so much weight and understand that you can't last, can't live much longer. Then return to thoughts of your parched throat that feels as if it is filled with a splintery wooden stake that keeps "being twisted and twisted."

A harrowing and personal experience. Well done! Well done indeed!
Gaeuney
Great story telling
Zavevidi
Very good story and well written. How do you deal with being trapped in such a small dark space that deep underground. When I think they were trapped as far under the ground, as high as a plane flies above the ground, I get chills! I couldn't put it down.
elektron
I heard the song written when I was 19-years-old. I wanted to know the real story and this book did it. It is was excellent.
Syleazahad
The writer of this book does such a good job in painting the picture of lives of these in this book about life and the dangers of coal mining!
Yggfyn
first Melissa Faye Greene book I'd read - awesome writer
Deodorant for your language
"Last Man Out" concerns two very different stories and issues. The first involves a coal mine collapsing in October 1958 in Springhill, Nova Scotia, the media circus that it attracted, the nervous anticipation of the families, and the struggles of two groups of survivors as they wait for days deep in the mine to be rescued. The second story and issue takes the reader from Canada to down south in Georgia where the survivors who were trapped were invited to vacation--the brainstorm of a PR agent who hoped to attract more tourism to the state. Georgia was under segregation and a vehemently racist governor at the time, and the state officials planning the event were aghast to learn that one of the invited survivors was black (mulatto).

Melissa Fay Greene described the efforts of the survivors in the mine to find food, water, and a way out in excellent detail. Different personalities were revealed in the stories. Also, above ground, the families of the miners had to deal with reporters rushing to the town which was the subject of the first live news from a disaster site (pg. 83). Some of the reporters were heartless in their drive to get good copy.

The chapters are very short, which is nice for reading during lunch breaks or before bedtime. The reason for the sudden appearance of chapters on Georgia tourism and the racist background of Governor Marvin Griffin is not immediately clear until about two thirds into the book when the governor's public relations aide, Sam Caldwell, received an epiphany to invite the entrapped survivors to Jekyll Island. The governor raised hell when he found out one of the survivors was mulatto (Maurice Ruddick). He and his family could not stay with his fellow miners in the white's only hotel. Arrangements were made for the Ruddicks to stay in a trailer in a segregated neighborhood. All efforts were made to appease the press and to put the policy of separate but equal in the most positive of light.

In the aftermath of the mining disaster and vacation, Ruddick was voted Canadian Citizen of the Year, but was not embraced by his community as he had thought. The other survivors struggled with their memories and the loss of friends although some received other jobs due to the publicity. What was sometimes lost in all the chapters on the Georgia vacation is that 74 miners died. The survivors who were trapped were rewarded--albeit by the selfish intentions of a state to attract tourism--after a tragedy that devastated the families and economy of Springhill.

One topic that Greene mentioned at the beginning of the book but does not touch on later, is the faulty structure of the Number 2 mine that collapsed due to a "bump" (underground earthquake). The three levels were dug in the shape of an "E" instead of alternating the tunnels which made for less cushioning between the levels. Miners knew of the weak structure of the mine and some voiced their concerns to each other. Some miners had already lived through an Explosion in the Number 4 colliery which happened in 1956. Did the 1958 Bump change how mines were constructed? Did those who designed the Number 2 colliery get reprimanded in any way? Greene did not address these issues.

Greene used a lot of flowery language: the miners were "hit by a third of the plagues of Egypt at once: blood, rock falling like hail, darkness, and death of the first born" (actually, this reader counts three quarters of the plagues) (pg. 46), one dying miner "sat as still as a statue of Buddha, encased in coal." (pg. 47). One miner suffered terribly because his arm was caught in a pillar holding up the rock ceiling. The author described his death with a lot of melodramatics (pg. 174). When coffee was delivered through a copper pipe to one group of survivors, "the novel sweetness and heft and deliciousness filled a man's mouth like a melting-warm, cold-spraying bite from a country fair caramel apple on an autumn day" (pg. 200). Some of the information may be a bit much--like some of the men holding themselves through their opened pants for comfort. How did the author discover this little detail? Did survivors admit to doing this?

Still, I recommend this book as a dual story of survival and a look at how far some government officials would go to hold on to their way of life. It is 342 pages with a few endnotes, bibliography, and index. Many people were interviewed by the author so a lot of the information in "Last Man Out" may have been published for the first time. A middle section has photos but, unfortunately, only Maurice Ruddick and his family was identified. The people in the other photos were not named. I would have liked to see photos of the other survivors who were trapped in the mine and discussed with such detail in this book.
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