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eBook The Mormon Menace: Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South epub

by Patrick Mason

eBook The Mormon Menace: Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South epub
  • ISBN: 019974002X
  • Author: Patrick Mason
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 16, 2011)
  • Pages: 264 pages
  • ePUB size: 1951 kb
  • FB2 size 1453 kb
  • Formats txt doc lit mobi


Patrick Q. Mason's "The Mormon Menace" begins to pull back the curtain on this long neglected subject. He does so by presenting the wider story of anti-Mormon violence in the Postbellum South, 1876 -1900, in the social and political context it deserves

Patrick Q. He does so by presenting the wider story of anti-Mormon violence in the Postbellum South, 1876 -1900, in the social and political context it deserves. His examination and acknowledgment of multi-layer factors contributing to white southern violence doesn't justify the acts, but it reveals the likelihood that in many cases, violent encounters were inevitable.

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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. It incarnates every unclean beast of lust, guile, falsehood, murder, despotism and spiritual wickedness. So wrote a prominent Southern Baptist official in 1899 of Mormonism. Rather than the quintessential American religion, as it has been dubbed by contemporary scholars, in the late nineteenth century Mormonism was Americas most vilified homegrown faith.

The Mormon Menace: Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South.

Anti-Mormonism was a significant intellectual, legal, religious, and cultural phenomenon, but in the South it was also violent

Anti-Mormonism was a significant intellectual, legal, religious, and cultural phenomenon, but in the South it was also violent. While southerners were concerned about distinctive Mormon beliefs and political practices, they were most alarmed at the "invasion" of Mormon missionaries in their communities and the prospect of their wives and daughters falling prey to polygamy. Moving to defend their homes and their honor against this threat, southerners turned to legislation, to religion, and, most dramatically, to vigilante violence

It incarnates every unclean beast of lust, guile, falsehood, murder, despotism and spiritual wickedness  . Rather than the "quintessential American religion," as it has been dubbed by contemporary scholars, in the late nineteenth century Mormonism was America's most vilified homegrown faith.

Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence.

May 2005 · The Journal of Asian Studies. Laura Dudley Jenkins. Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence. By Brass Paul R. September 1998 · American Political Science Association. Situational factors and the dynamics of criminal violence /.

Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South. His careful dissection of these bloody events leads us deep into the southern mentality and the contentious images of Mormonism in America. He finds the southern experience even reshaped Mormonism's view of itself.

Menace : Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South. 'It incarnates every unclean beast of lust, guile, falsehood, murder, despotism and spiritual wickedness.

book by Patrick Mason. The Mormon Menace : Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South. So wrote a prominent Southern Baptist official in 1899, as he viewed with disgust what contemporary scholars have called the "quintessential American religion.

The Mormon Menace: Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South Oxford University Press, 2011. The Prohibition of Interracial Marriage in Utah, 1888-1963, Utah Historical Quarterly 76:2 (Spring 2008): 108-131.

"It incarnates every unclean beast of lust, guile, falsehood, murder, despotism and spiritual wickedness." So wrote a prominent Southern Baptist official in 1899 of Mormonism. Rather than the "quintessential American religion," as it has been dubbed by contemporary scholars, in the late nineteenth century Mormonism was America's most vilified homegrown faith. A vast national campaign featuring politicians, church leaders, social reformers, the press, women's organizations, businessmen, and ordinary citizens sought to end the distinctive Latter-day Saint practice of plural marriage, and to extinguish the entire religion if need be.Placing the movement against polygamy in the context of American and southern history, Mason demonstrates that anti-Mormonism was one of the earliest vehicles for reconciliation between North and South after the Civil War and Reconstruction. Southerners joined with northern reformers and Republicans to endorse the use of newly expanded federal power to vanquish the perceived threat to Christian marriage and the American republic.Anti-Mormonism was a significant intellectual, legal, religious, and cultural phenomenon, but in the South it was also violent. While southerners were concerned about distinctive Mormon beliefs and political practices, they were most alarmed at the "invasion" of Mormon missionaries in their communities and the prospect of their wives and daughters falling prey to polygamy. Moving to defend their homes and their honor against this threat, southerners turned to legislation, to religion, and, most dramatically, to vigilante violence.The Mormon Menace provides new insights into some of the most important discussions of the late nineteenth century and of our own age, including debates over the nature and limits of religious freedom; the contest between the will of the people and the rule of law; and the role of citizens, churches, and the state in regulating and defining marriage.
Comments: (5)
Grotilar
In the interests of full disclosure, I am personally acquainted with the author and have the utmost respect for his scholarship. In addition, I am Mormon myself, I lived in the south from 1989-2000, and I have a religion degree. I also have at least one ancestor, a great-great grandfather, who served in the Southern States mission in the 1890s. I really enjoyed this book. Prior to reading it, I didn't know any of the details of anti-Mormon activity in the South in the period, but I was confident that there had been some. I was startled to learn the specifics of the violence because it was new to me, but at the same time it was not surprising. I had much more sympathy with the anti-Mormon position of many southerners than I expected. Crossing the line into violence and murder lost the sympathy, though. I was entertained by some of the elaborate mental hoops being jumped through by both Mormons and those who railed against them. Patrick Mason's work magnifies a little known segment of history and places it in a helpful broader context of what was happening on the national scene at the time. I will be passing my copy on to other members of my family, and no doubt they will also enjoy it.
Tar
Informative. Not a simple read but really good. Book came on time.
Frosha
looked good; haven't read it yet
Hucama
For more than a century, the story of the Latter-day Saint experience in the Southeastern United States has been dominated by the voices of nineteenth and early twentieth-century Mormon missionaries. The writings and sermons of men like Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, George Albert Smith, John Morgan, and J. Golden Kimball, together with the experiences of hundreds of other returned missionaries, forged the connection between Mormon identity and anti-Mormon violence in the Southern States. Beyond the republication of these accounts, and a handful of related articles and dissertations, it seems the South holds little interest for students of Mormon history.

Patrick Q. Mason's "The Mormon Menace" begins to pull back the curtain on this long neglected subject. He does so by presenting the wider story of anti-Mormon violence in the Postbellum South, 1876 -1900, in the social and political context it deserves. His examination and acknowledgment of multi-layer factors contributing to white southern violence doesn't justify the acts, but it reveals the likelihood that in many cases, violent encounters were inevitable.

The collapse of the Confederacy as a result of the Civil War and the difficulty of Reconstruction facilitated a less than tolerant environment for existing minorities and new outsiders. When Mormon missionaries arrived in force in the 1870s they didn't come to add to the South; they came to take from the South. Their message was not subtle. The goal was conversion and preparation for permanent departure to colonies in the West.

Acceptance of Mormon Christianity ultimately led to the severing of lifelong multi-generational relationships among hundreds of southern families. As difficult as separation and relocation may have been for the converted believer, most accepted it as a necessary exchange. Their kinfolk and neighbors often saw it as an unnecessary and preventable loss.

These preventable losses did not mix well in a subculture of vigilantism where lynching was seen as an acceptable alternative to state-sponsored law enforcement. Violence was regularly used to keep the large black population `in their place' and when it came to those considered a threat to the local power structure, violence was an equal opportunity solution. Being white ministers did not exclude Mormon preachers from the established pattern.

In part, due to the short arm of infrastructure in the rural South, people could literally get away with murder. Mob violence rarely led to arrests in part because portions of the larger community supported the intent of the mobs. Local newspapers typically advised residents of the arrival of Mormon elders and recommended their abrupt removal.

During the period covered by the book (1876 -1900), approximately nine hundred elders served in the South. Mason reports three hundred and thirty-six cases of violence perpetrated on Mormons during this period. However, many of his cases did not lead to significant bodily harm. Mobs relented, missionaries fled, and calls for violence were more posturing than actual attempts at physical harm. Violence directed against Mormons led to less than a dozen deaths. Though significant to those involved, it is not in the same league with the sustained attack against emancipated slaves and their descendants. While the Utah Territory mourned the murder of individual missionaries like Joseph Standing, and built monuments to honor their sacrifice, hundreds of African Americans were lynched with little to no recognition of their existence.

Mason presents Catholics and Jews in the South in proper perspective; outsiders, accepted individually but rejected collectively. Part of the greater community but viewed with suspicion. In many cases, priests and rabbis successfully adapted to culture by downplaying differences. They sought to assimilate while still maintaining core elements of their religious and cultural identity. Mormon missionaries did not. Concern for the economic impact of Jewish merchandising and Catholic support of papal interests took a back seat to what was seen as the openly confrontational message of Mormonism.

Polygamy, the expanding Mormon kingdom in the West, the perception of anti-American politics, and repeated sermons by Protestant ministers claiming Mormon missionaries were nothing more than agents of the devil, presented Mormonism as a serious affront to southern dignity. Neither Catholics or Jews proclaimed such revolutionary ideas and neither group had the visible and united backing of a theocracy with the purported intention of ruling the world.

In public discourse, Mormonism was polygamy and polygamy was Mormonism. Although never practiced in the South, the thought of polygamy cut to the core of the southern gentleman's duty to protect the fidelity of his female kin. It was seen as an attack on the virtue of white women. Mason proposes that the singular doctrine of polygamy, more than anything else, fueled anti-Mormon violence in the South.

However, it must be remembered that during this period missionaries in the South traveled without 'purse or script' relying on the hospitality of non-Mormons for food and shelter. The doctrine alone was not enough to convince every family that Mormons deserved sub-human treatment. At times they were hungry but they did not die of starvation.

When polygamy was no longer an issue of concern, the majority of the violence faded. Following the Reed Smoot Hearings, under the administration of Church President Joseph F. Smith, southern converts were encouraged to stay in the South rather than emigrate to the West. An ancillary result was that other southerners could see that their Mormon neighbors were neither polygamists nor subversive, thus validating the claim that polygamy had indeed ended. This shift also enabled Latter-day Saint congregations to become permanent establishments rather than transitory gateways to the West. The change in directive enabled Mormons to maintain more of their southern identity. They were no longer a commodity for exportation.

From a Mormon perspective, anti-Mormon violence in the South can be seen simply as the forces of evil attempting to stop the preaching of the gospel of Jesus Christ. While this perspective may be extreme in the minds of non-Mormon readers, few can claim that violence is the result of charitable feelings and a love of fellow man. Understanding what led to the intensity of anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South may help both groups of readers discern between the quick, shoot from the hip, identification of right and wrong and the need to comprehend factors that contributed to the outcome. Mason introduces readers to this wider perspective. This perspective will benefit future studies of Mormon and Southern relations and the larger study of cultural competition in North America.

May his work be recognized for opening the gate a little wider to the study of the Latter-day Saint experience in the South and invite further investigation.
Goldenfang
Well researched and written, this book adeptly constructs a portrait of postbellum religious bigotry and violence that both adds to the scholarly discussion and is approachable for all readers.
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