» » The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration, and Globalization in Honduras

eBook The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration, and Globalization in Honduras epub

by Daniel R. Reichman

eBook The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration, and Globalization in Honduras epub
  • ISBN: 0801477298
  • Author: Daniel R. Reichman
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: ILR Press; 1 edition (October 20, 2011)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1196 kb
  • FB2 size 1135 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi docx txt


In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United.

In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United States. The small village―called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada―was once home to a thriving coffee economy.

Reichman analyzes human migration and economic globalization via ethnography of a small Honduran village between 2001 and 2006. The book's title evokes the twin dislocations of economic globalization affecting the village―the volatility of coffee markets following the demise of the International Coffee Agreement in 1989 and the upswing in global human migration in the two decades that followed. The book examines migration, religion, and coffee-planting strategies as various potential coping mechanisms for dealing with these dislocations.

Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011. 224 pp. Sarah Lyon University of Kentucky While it provides deep insight into the Honduran culture of migration and contemporary religious expression, at its heart The Broken Village is ultimately an exploration of the dominant ethos of individualism ultimately resulting from neoliberal political and economic transformations.

Daniel Reichman’s The Broken Village. Reichman’s compelling and eloquent case study of a rural. Honduran town not only reveals the systemic nature of this predicament using robust ethnographic. has the potential to save us all. According to Reichman, we need to look to Durkheim, not Weber. more on that in a moment), and we need to pay much closer attention to how processes of ‘depo-. liticization’ are changing the way ‘people think about their role as citizens within a defined col-.

The Broken Village book. In The Broken Village, Daniel R. The small village-called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada-was once home to a thriving coffee economy.

The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration, and Globalization in Honduras. edu/books Thank you for downloading an article from [email protected] For information, address Cornell University Press, Sage House, 512 East State Street, Ithaca, New York 14850.

Village Coffee Migration and from ANTH 2 at University of California, Santa Barbara. Village: Coffee, Migration and Globalization in Honduras.

WW Norton Reichman Daniel 2011 The Broken Village Coffee Migration and from ANTH 2 at University of California, Santa Barbara. The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration and Globalization in Honduras. Cornell University, ILR Press. 2) Films are an important part of the classroom content of this course. You must attend class to see these films. TAGS Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Ethnography, INTRODUCTORY CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Reichman, Online Ethics project.

In The damaged Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the tale of a distant village in Honduras that reworked virtually in a single day from a sleepy coffee-growing group to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the us. The small village-called the following by way of th. . The small village-called the following by way of the pseudonym l. a. Quebrada-was as soon as domestic to a thriving espresso financial system.

Reichman explores how the new "migration economy" has upended cultural ideas of success and failure, family dynamics, and local politics.

In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United States. The small village―called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada―was once home to a thriving coffee economy. Recently, it has become dependent on migrants working in distant places like Long Island and South Dakota, who live in ways that most Honduran townspeople struggle to comprehend or explain. Reichman explores how the new "migration economy" has upended cultural ideas of success and failure, family dynamics, and local politics.

During his time in La Quebrada, Reichman focused on three different strategies for social reform―a fledgling coffee cooperative that sought to raise farmer incomes and establish principles of fairness and justice through consumer activism; religious campaigns for personal morality that were intended to counter the corrosive effects of migration; and local discourses about migrant "greed" that labeled migrants as the cause of social crisis, rather than its victims. All three phenomena had one common trait: They were settings in which people presented moral visions of social welfare in response to a perceived moment of crisis. The Broken Village integrates sacred and secular ideas of morality, legal and cultural notions of justice, to explore how different groups define social progress.

Comments: (6)
Timberahue
I purchased this book for school as it was part of the course syllabus, however I thoroughly enjoyed it. The book vividly paints the picture of “La Quebrada,” a pseudonym used to mark a rural Honduran town whose crippled coffee economy led to a dependence on labor migration to the United States. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in Honduras and supplemental interviews with migrants and key informants in the United States, Reichman immerses the reader in the issues that face migrants, their families, and the community as a whole. Throughout the book, he follows the experiences of individuals in La Quebrada, expertly situating these unique personal accounts into a theoretical context that illustrates the sociological foundation of life in a town both plagued by and dependent on emigration. In an excellent use of the sociological imagination, the author uses ethnographic methods and in-depth personal interviews to place the unique migration experiences of subjects within the macro-level forces of market liberalization and globalization that push and pull people across borders and away from their families.

It's a very riveting read and definitely an interesting discussion on Free Trade products. I would recommend to anyone, even those who are not going into anthropologic studies.
Anarius
Fascinating read, it really helped me gain a better understanding about the underlying changes in global policies that have led to the currently immigration patterns in the world today.
Biaemi
A good read
nailer
It is not easy finding good case studies for college undergraduates these days. Too much of what anthropologists and other academics produce is theoretically opaque, insignificant or, if it’s good, too long and detailed for one to two weeks of reading assignments. So I am overjoyed to find Daniel Reichman’s “three-fer” that can be used to launch discussions of peasant agriculture and fair trade, the evangelical Protestant boom in 3rd World countries, and migration to wealthy countries for work.

At 177 pages of text, The Broken Village is a model of economy. The author is even good at sketching the personalities of some of his key informants in the pseudonymous coffee-growing village of La Quebrada, Honduras. The contrast between the coffee economy and the migrant economy, and what the two have in common, is enlightening. Anyone who needs an introduction to Honduras or why so many Hondurans want to come to the US will also find The Broken Village enlightening. Interestingly, while some migrants are economically desperate, many are not. Fellow anthropologists and sociologists, let’s publish more books like this.
Prinna
Not the book I was expecting because the author deals with coffee, immigration, religion from a sociological and anthropological level. Although I was looking for for aspects of coffee history. I learn a great deal on the immigration crisis in the United States and especially how the people of Honduras fit in. Not an easy read but a worthwhile one.
Talrajas
I assigned this book for my undergraduate class in Latin American politics and it triggered insightful, thoughtful, probing reaction papers from the whole group. I think Reichman has provided a wonderful study in making original and insightful connections between his close ethnographic portrait of social behavior in one town while contextualizing that town within its larger framing conditions -- the national economy and transnational (migration) politics that have "broken" its social cohesion. The resulting study is intriguing, as well as readable and accessible as it delves into tough questions of social conservativism, sectarian politics, migration tensions and the social dilemmas that arise from all this. (A separate chapter on the Evangelical and Catholic churches might be useful for those looking for comparative studies in this area.) For insight into one well-spring of the northern migration, A Broken Village is a valuable read, even a must-read. It's certainly a great asset in helping students and any serious readers grasp the bigger picture regarding one of our most tense public debates, otherwise rife with stereotypes, simplifications and ignorance.
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