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eBook Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 epub

by David Levering Lewis,James T. Campbell

eBook Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 epub
  • ISBN: 0143111981
  • Author: David Levering Lewis,James T. Campbell
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (April 24, 2007)
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • ePUB size: 1864 kb
  • FB2 size 1692 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi docx mbr


Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005. James T. Campbell, PhD, is professor of United States history and the Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States history at Stanford University. Dr. Campbell earned his BA from Yale University and both his MA and PhD from Stanford University. David Levering Lewis is the author of God's Crucible: Islam and the Making of Europe, 570–1215; W. E. B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868–1919; W. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century, 1919–1963; and more.

James Campbell's wonderfully written history of African American journeys to Africa, from the late 1700s to the 1990s, explores the changing answers that black Americans have given to this question

James Campbell's wonderfully written history of African American journeys to Africa, from the late 1700s to the 1990s, explores the changing answers that black Americans have given to this question

Jack S. Blanton Chair in History, University of Texas. Past Pulitzer Prize winner. A rich and surprising new telling of the journey of the iconic American soldier whose death turns out not to have been the main point of his life.

Jack S. Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, by David W. Blight (Simon & Schuster). The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea, by Jack E. Davis (Liveright/W. Moved by the Board from the Biography category.

Middle Passages book. Campbell, David Levering Lewis. Jan 14, 2018 Brian Bergen-Aurand rated it it was amazing. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005. Middle Passages - James T. Campbell. by James T. Campbell and David Levering Lewis. Many works of history deal with the journeys of blacks in bondage from Africa to the United States along the ?middle passage,? but there is also a rich and little examined history of African Americans traveling in the opposite direction.

James Campbell's wonderfully written history of African American journeys to Africa, from the late 1700s to the 1990s, explores the changing answers that black Americans have given to this question.

James Campbell's wonderfully written history of African American journeys to Africa, from the late 1700s to the 1990s, explores the changing answers that black Americans have given to this question

Электронная книга "Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005", James T.

Электронная книга "Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005", James T. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A groundbreaking history of African American journeys back to Africa over the course of three centuries, a book whose enormous .

A groundbreaking history of African American journeys back to Africa over the course of three centuries, a book whose enormous accomplishment reveals to us that without understanding the long-evolving place of Africa in the African American imagination, our understanding of American history is woefully incomplete. As James T. Campbell shows in this marvelous book, these journeys illuminate not only the enduring importance of Africa in African American life but also the changing contours of African American life in the United States.

Items related to Middle Passages: African American Journeys to. .

Items related to Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa . In Middle Passages, award-winning historian James T. Campbell vividly recounts more than two centuries of African American journeys to Africa, including the experiences of such extraordinary figures as Langston Hughes, . DuBois, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Maya Angelou.

Penguin announces a prestigious new series under presiding editor Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. Many works of history deal with the journeys of blacks in bondage from Africa to the United States along the ?middle passage,? but there is also a rich and little examined history of African Americans traveling in the opposite direction. In Middle Passages, award-winning historian James T. Campbell vividly recounts more than two centuries of African American journeys to Africa, including the experiences of such extraordinary figures as Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Maya Angelou. A truly groundbreaking work, Middle Passages offers a unique perspective on African Americans? ever-evolving relationship with their ancestral homeland, as well as their complex, often painful relationship with the United States.
Comments: (6)
Simple fellow
Perfect condition!! This book is a must have for every young person, especially since many states in the southern US are removing slavery from the history books.
Tane
This is my favorite African American history book. It does not exclude or ignore the implications of facts in history as some others do. It's beautiful written. Recommended.
Vozilkree
Campbell points out in a bibliographic essay at the back of the book that he had originally intended to write about African American travel writers on the subject of Africa, but changed course as his research and writing proceeded. The end product turns out to be a very interesting work on African Americans whose personal histories became interwoven with the continent of their ancestors. He starts with Paul Cuffe, and along the way we are introduced to many under known figures such as Daniel Coker, Martin Delany, Henry Turner, and William Henry Sheppard. There are lengthy sections on better known figures such as WEB Dubois, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, George Schuyler and Maya Angelou. The first third of the book goes a bit slow as history overtrumps storytelling, but the two become marvelously converged as we get to William Henry Sheppard and continues to the book's terminus. We get a fair dose of African history along the way, and this enhances our journey. The author is scrupulously fair when dealing with Africa's controversies and contradictions. While some African Americans are horrified by scenes of chaos and murders and corruption, others see the beauty and grace, and promise of the continent. This book rates highly for the subject covered, and it rates highly for the quality of writing. Mr. Campbell is an educated man, and he writes extremely well. An earlier reviewer bewails his use of "ten dollar words," which is mystifying. Why would we want a book directed to a fifth grade readership? Perhaps that reviewer would best benefit getting his history from television. The writing is outstanding, and the topic is interesting. Five stars.
Inertedub
James Campbell's wonderfully written history of African American journeys to Africa, from the late 1700s to the 1990s, explores the changing answers that black Americans have given to this question. Posed in a famous 1925 poem by Countee Cullen, this question is the flip side of another: "What is America to me?" African Americans have always had to negotiate their double identity: How much American, how much African? In this erudite but very accessible book, Campbell follows African American missionaries, expatriates, writers & journalists as they each experience some part of Africa and interpret it within their own American intellectual frameworks. He shows how different generations of black Americans saw Africa through the cultural lenses of their own eras (religious, scientific, literary) and were also influenced by the current status of blacks in the United States. Each chapter focuses on the personal stories of one or more African Americans, including 19th century missionaries & emigrants and 20th century authors & expatriates, some famous and some not: Paul Cuffe, Martin Delaney, William Henry Sheppard, Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, and many more. In the process, he highlights many important episodes in African history, from the settlement of Sierra Leone & Liberia through the atrocities of the Congo Free State and independence in Ghana to the Rwandan genocide & Africa's First World War. Although filled with historical details, the book is never dry or dull; Campbell writes like a storyteller and focuses on individuals, supplementing his narrative with quotations from their own works. The last chapter is a study of three African American reporters (two from the Washington Post and one from the New York Times) who worked in Africa during the 1990s. Campbell's account of their divergent responses to common events shows how much his theme still resonants, especially but not only for black Americans: how one interprets America determines how one sees Africa, and vice versa.
Brariel
This book I probably would give 3 and a half stars if the amazon rating system allowed it. It is well written and engaging. My criticisms are that he tends to use 10 dollar words when 2 dollar words would have been fine. That's not necessarily a bad thing, since it expands one's vocabulary, but I found myself going to the dictionary a few more times than I would have liked.

I learned quite a few things from his book, including some I ashamedly realized I should have already known. That is another problem, since the author tends to stray into general African history quite often rather than sticking to the words of the people who visited Afica. This is somewhat unavoidable since the reader needs context, but I got the feeling the author either has or wants to write a general history book of Africa.

I reccommend this book to anyone who is interested in Afican history or on leading historical American figures of African ancestory.
Bearus
Campbell takes a fascinating twist on the typical meaning of the term "Middle Passage" which often highlights the horrors of capture and the even more horrific ocean-crossing from Africa to America.

Instead, "Middle Passages" weaves together accounts of African Americans who crossed the Atlantic from America back to Africa. In so doing, Campbell writes a compelling narrative of the pull back home that will provide insight to readers of all races.

Reviewer: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., is the author of Beyond the Suffering: Embracing the Legacy of African American Soul Care and Spiritual Direction , Spiritual Friends: A Methodology of Soul Care And Spiritual Direction, and Soul Physicians.
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