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eBook Children of the Fur Trade: Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest epub

by John C. Jackson

eBook Children of the Fur Trade: Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest epub
  • ISBN: 087842329X
  • Author: John C. Jackson
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mountain Pr; First Edition edition (October 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 326 pages
  • ePUB size: 1154 kb
  • FB2 size 1128 kb
  • Formats docx doc mbr lit


During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest

During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest. Descendants of European or Canadian fathers and Native American mothers, these mixed-blood settlersacalled MA(c)tisawere pivotal to the development of the Oregon Country, but have been generally neglected in its written history. Today During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest.

The late John C. Jackson’s many publications include “Shadow of the Tetons: David E. Jackson and the Claiming of the American West,” and “Children of the Fur Trade: Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest. Although my usual turf and time involves the Northwest Territories of the Commonwealth of Virginia, the fur trade is a fascinating segment of history as is the Pacific Rim trade of the early nineteenth century.

The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Children of the fur trade : forgotten Métis of the Pacific Northwest, John C. Jackson.

Children of the fur trade. Tell us if something is incorrect. Title: Children of the Fur Trade Author: Jackson, John C. Publisher: Univ of Arizona Pr Publication Date: 2007/10/01 Number of Pages: 326 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: Children of the Fur Trade. Northwest Reprints (Paperback). Oregon State University Press.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Children of the fur trade : forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest John C. Book's title: Children of the fur trade : forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest John C. Library of Congress Control Number: 95042976. Jackson’s many publications include Shadow of the Tetons: David E. Jackson and the Claiming of the American West, and Children of the Fur Trade: Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest. 1. The Fur Trade Gamble: North West Company on the Pacific Slope 1800-1820

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Reprint of an Olympia author’s 1996 book about the mixed-blood settlers who played a key role in developing the Pacific Northwest during the early 19th century. Most Read Entertainment Stories. A children’s picture book about the Seattle football team. Michael Upchurch, Seattle Times book critic.

During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest. Descendants of European or Canadian fathers and Native American mothers, these mixed-blood settlerscalled M©tiswere pivotal to the development of the Oregon Country, but have been generally neglected in its written history. Today we know them by the names they left on the land and the waters: The Dalles, Deschutes, Grand Ronde, Portneuf, Payette; and on the peoples who lived there: Pend Oreille, Coeur dAlene, Nez Perce. John C. Jacksons Children of the Fur Trade recovers a vital part of Northwest history and gives readers a vivid and memorable portrait of M©tis life at the western edge of North America. This informal account shows the M©tis as explorers and mapmakers, as fur trappers and traders, and as boatmen and travelers in a vanishing landscape. Because of their mixed race, they were forced into the margin between cultures in collision. Often disparaged as half-breeds, they became links between the dispossessed native peoples and the new order of pioneer settlement. Meet the independently minded Jacco Finlay, the beautiful Helene McDonald, fearsome Tom McKay and the bear-fighting Iroquois Ignace Hatchiorauquasha, whose M©tisse wife, Madame Gray, charmed lonely fur traders. Here is the rawhide knot of the mountain men who brought their Indian wives to suffer the censure of missionaries while building a community where their mixed-blood children were no longer welcome. A riveting glimpse into a unique heritage, illustrated with historic maps, drawings, and photographs, this book will interest and inform both the scholar and the general reader.
Comments: (5)
Mitynarit
Children of the Fur Trade; Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest is an excellent book. Very well-written, with facts and stories backed up with maps, drawings, and photos which make the history come alive for the reader. I borrowed this book from a friend while doing research on the fur traders. I enjoyed it so much, I had to order my own copy. Now I want to read other books written by John C. Jackson.
Rrinel
It has a lot of information, but did not have information about my wifes ancestors.
romrom
From the book, I found out that the Metis of the Pacific Northwest formed many communities in that area. My great-grandparents were born in Walla Walla, WA. and we were told that they were French- Canadian and "Black Irish". I read that in Walla Walla, is where they founded communities and that they hid there ancestry and called themselves French-Canadian. So, on reading this, I found out that the missing part to my full heritage was actually a mixture of French and Native American Indian. I owe a great gratitude to Mr. Jackson. Thank-you!!! Sean
Gajurus
This is one of the first books that I read about the Métis, who were in the words of John Jackson, "children of European or Canadian fathers and native American mothers." The version pictured is a 2007 facsimile reprint by Oregon State University of a book originally published in 1996. I sometimes wish Amazon had a dual star system. I would recommend it with 5 stars to anyone interested in Pacific Northwest history, those meeting the Métis for the first time who promise to read better books, and any descendants of the fur trade who might encounter kin in its pages. It is a treasure just because many have found their own family while reading this fun book. The book was ahead of its time when published because of its focus on "the forgotten Métis of the Pacific Northwest", at a time when any treatment of Métis was rare, and any outside of Canada was virtually non-existent. If I had read this after better research such as Van Kirk's "Many Tender Ties" or Peterson and Brown "The New Peoples", I'm afraid I would have awarded it only 2 stars. Three stars is a good compromise if one views it largely as a local history of Métis who lived in "Oregon Country." Unfortunately the terminology is dated, the tone is sometimes patronizing (e.g., that "children" in the title), and its emphasis on the men of the fur trade rather than the women. There is a dearth of topical treatment on Métis ethnicity formation in its pages. Instead it presents individual Métis like "Jacco Finley", Charles McKay, or Thomas Flett as colorful characters. Jumping from one character to another makes the book a trifle repetitive, geographically confusing, and hard to follow sometimes. The index is a little light, especially in regards to topics of relevance to the formation of Métis culture or geography. Don't get me wrong - the book is chock full of information. Due to its (lack of) organization, my copy looks like a porcupine stuck full of pink post it notes. Good illustrations, workable footnotes in a historian's style, and a reasonable bibliography. Well-researched, Jackson accessed a lot of primary and secondary sources to write this. Just make sure you order newer ethnohistories like those recommended above if you buy Jackson's fun but somewhat dated book.
Ckelond
Mr. Jackson did excellent research for this book. I have numerous ancestors mentioned in the book and even had a picture of one that I had never seen before. Anyone interested in the history of the Western Mt, Idaho and Eastern WA area, will need to read this book. I hope that the Author publishes more material from his research.
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