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eBook Cold War University: Madison and the New Left in the Sixties (Studies in American Thought and Culture) epub

by Matthew Levin

eBook Cold War University: Madison and the New Left in the Sixties (Studies in American Thought and Culture) epub
  • ISBN: 0299292843
  • Author: Matthew Levin
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (July 17, 2013)
  • Pages: 234 pages
  • ePUB size: 1948 kb
  • FB2 size 1191 kb
  • Formats lrf docx lit azw


Cold War University book.

Cold War University book.

Curriculum and the Cold Wa.

Curriculum and the Cold War. January 2015 · Science. Spurred by concerns that the American education system was failing to keep pace with the Soviets after the "Sputnik crisis" of the late 1950s, a dramatic change occurred in the mathematics that was taught in American schools in the 1960s.

In Cold War University, Matthew Levin traces the paradox that developed: higher education became increasingly .

In Cold War University, Matthew Levin traces the paradox that developed: higher education became increasingly enmeshed in the Cold War struggle even as university campuses became centers of opposition to Cold War policies. Levin documents the development of student political organizations in Madison in the 1950s and the emergence of a mass movement in the decade that followed, adding texture to the history of national youth protests of the time.

1 Mattson, Kevin, Intellectuals in Action: The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002); Perlstein, Rick, Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus (New York: Nation.

1 Mattson, Kevin, Intellectuals in Action: The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002); Perlstein, Rick, Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus (New York: Nation Books, 2001); Rossinow, Doug, The Politics of Authenticity: Liberalism, Christianity, and the New Left in America (New York: Columbia. University Press, 1998); Suri, Jeremi, Power and Protest: Global Revolutions and the Rise of Détente (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003). Recommend this journal.

The Wisconsin School of American diplomatic history is a school of thought that emerged from the history department of the University of Wisconsin in the 1950s and 1960s.

Cold War University: Madison and the New Left in the Sixties by Matthew Levin. DOI: 1. 4321/jstudradi.

Kennedy’s Cold War frustrations in Cuba and Vietnam worried Americans. The 1962 missile crisis narrowly avoided a nuclear disaster. The civil rights movement gained momentum with student sit-ins, Freedom Rides, and crises in Mississippi and Alabama. Martin Luther King, J. emerged as a spokesman for non-violent social change.

In Cold War University, Matthew Levin traces the paradox that developed: higher education became .

Age of Contradiction: American Thought and Culture in the 1960s It's must reading for anyone concerned with the New Left and postwar political.

Age of Contradiction: American Thought and Culture in the 1960s. Tom Grace has written a deep study of one local, very all-American site of radicalization over the longue durée from the early 1950s to the mid–1970s. There is nothing else like it. It's must reading for anyone concerned with the New Left and postwar political change. ―Van Gosse, author of Rethinking the New Left: An Interpretative History. ―Maurice Isserman, author of If I Had a Hammer: The Death of the Old Left and the Birth of the New Left.

As the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union escalated in the 1950s and 1960s, the federal government directed billions of dollars to American universities to promote higher enrollments, studies of foreign languages and cultures, and, especially, scientific research. In Cold War University, Matthew Levin traces the paradox that developed: higher education became increasingly enmeshed in the Cold War struggle even as university campuses became centers of opposition to Cold War policies. The partnerships between the federal government and major research universities sparked a campus backlash that provided the foundation, Levin argues, for much of the student dissent that followed. At the University of Wisconsin in Madison, one of the hubs of student political activism in the 1950s and 1960s, the protests reached their flashpoint with the 1967 demonstrations against campus recruiters from Dow Chemical, the manufacturers of napalm.            Levin documents the development of student political organizations in Madison in the 1950s and the emergence of a mass movement in the decade that followed, adding texture to the history of national youth protests of the time. He shows how the University of Wisconsin tolerated political dissent even at the height of McCarthyism, an era named for Wisconsin's own virulently anti-Communist senator, and charts the emergence of an intellectual community of students and professors that encouraged new directions in radical politics. Some of the events in Madison—especially the 1966 draft protests, the 1967 sit-in against Dow Chemical, and the 1970 Sterling Hall bombing—have become part of the fabric of "The Sixties," touchstones in an era that continues to resonate in contemporary culture and politics.
Comments: (2)
Llathidan
Having been a student in Madison during the 1960s, I was amazed that the young author (b. 1973) was able to depict events and conditions so accurately. He relied heavily on commentators, such as Paul Buhle, who were observers and participants in those formative events. The book provided me with historical perspective in that it reviewed political activities in Madison before the 1960s of which I had been unaware. Acknowledging the long succession of Socialist mayors in Milwaukee was important. This background, along with the right-wing traditions of the state embodied by McCarthy, help to explain the current vehement political antagonisms in Wisconsin. I came away with a better understanding of the role that the Cold War played in issues raised by the Left on campus, although this thesis does not explain Civil Rights, feminist, environmental, and Native American political causes. Incidentally, the Progressives championed all of these causes early in the last century, and the montly magazine, The Progressive, is still published in Madison; the Onion also began there.

As I recall the period, students were mostly concerned with US imperialism, which was largely independent of the Soviet Union--except that the government rationalized its support for authoritarian third-world regimes that aided US corporations on grounds that we needed to fight godless communism. I recall that the student newspaper, the Daily Cardinal, explained political events in Southeast Asia, including the presence of covert US troops, before the mainstream media got wind of them.

Levin suggests that the New Left faded partly because of its use of violent tactics. These demonstrations were almost all peaceful, with vandalism resorted to only later and sporadically. The great majority of violence was perpetrated by the police in riot gear, as at the Dow demonstration. These vicious attacks radicalized many students. The book revealed that at one point 53% of students reported having engaged in some form of political protest--young whippersnappers on your cell phones, take note! Also, bear in mind that the country had been protesting the Vietnam war with massive rallies for many years, getting only troop and bombing escalations. Talk about violence--hundreds of thousands of Americans and Vietnamese died in that struggle. Protesters were angry, and some turned violent. The accidental death of one person in the Army Math Research Center bombing was unfortunate, but not enough to discredit the whole movement--as many commentators tried to do. Incidentally, one thing that really riled up protesters was that the University lied about the Math Center doing war-related research, and it came out that administrators laughed about it among themselves.

Also very good is the book's descriptions of the various contributions by particular professors. It is probably hard for today's students to appreciate how very important politics was to us, and how we discussed political ideas and history constantly. We cared about improving the country, not just shouting "USA!" mindlessly. Progress was made, as Levin concludes, on many issues, but we failed to prevent widening of the gap between rich and poor. Class analysis took a back seat to feminism, important as this cause was. It was tough overcoming the reflexive anticommunism and, frankly, ignorance of many working class people, who were seduced by establishmentarian attacks on hippies and leftists.

This is a GREAT account of a pivotal stage of history. It's very well written and authoritative. If you have any interest in this period or campus activism in general, GET THIS BOOK.
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