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eBook Saints Under Siege: The Texas State Raid on the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (New and Alternative Religions) epub

by James T. Richardson,Stuart A. Wright

eBook Saints Under Siege: The Texas State Raid on the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (New and Alternative Religions) epub
  • ISBN: 0814795293
  • Author: James T. Richardson,Stuart A. Wright
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press (October 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 281 pages
  • ePUB size: 1541 kb
  • FB2 size 1801 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi lit lrf


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Saints under Siege: The Texas State Raid on the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (with James T. Richardson) (August 2011), New York University Press, ISBN 978-0-8147-9529-3. Storming Zion: Examining Government Raids on New or Nontraditional Religious Communities (with Susan J. Palmer) (forthcoming) Oxford University Press. Wood, Louise (February 2010). Under contract with Oxford University Press, Wright and Palmer are completing what they believe will be the first comprehensive study ever conducted of government raids on religious communities -from Central and West Texas to European locales.

Saints Under Siege book. The volume considers the raid as an exemplar case of a larger pattern of state actions against minority religions, offering comparative analyses to other government raids both historically and across cultures. In its look beyond the Texas raid, it provides compelling evidence of social intolerance and state repression of unpopular minority faiths in general, and the FLDS in particular.

Home Browse Books Book details, Saints under Siege: The Texas .

Home Browse Books Book details, Saints under Siege: The Texas State Raid on the. Saints under Siege: The Texas State Raid on the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints. In April 2008, state police and child protection authorities raided Yearning for Zion Ranch near Eldorado, Texas, a community of 800 members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints (FLDS), a polygamist branch of the Mormons. State officials claimed that the raid, which was triggered by anonymous phone calls from an underage girl to a domestic violence hotline, was based on evidence of widespread child sexual abuse.

The 2008 Texas raid on the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) at the Yearning for Zion (YFZ) Ranch that resulted in more than four hundred children being taken into custody by the state was not an anomalous event, as the chapters in this volume make clear.

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For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit. Richardson, New . Richardson, New York University Press 2011). Wright also serves as legal expert in his field. He has served on the Board of Directors for the Association for the Academic Study of New Religions since its inception in 2001. Armageddon in Waco: Critical Perspectives on the Branch Davidian Conflict, University Of Chicago Press (September 20, 1995)

International Journal for the Study of New Religions, Vol 3, No 1 (2012).

International Journal for the Study of New Religions, Vol 3, No 1 (2012).

the Texas State raid on the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints. by Stuart A. Wright, James T. Richardson. Published 2011 by New York University Press in New York. Deconstructing official rationales for the Texas State raid on the FLDS, Stuart A. Wright. Texas redux : a comparative analysis of the FLDS and Branch Davidian raids, Stuart A. Wright and Jennifer Lara Fagen.

In April 2008, state police and child protection authorities raided Yearning for Zion Ranch near Eldorado, Texas, a community of 800 members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints (FLDS), a polygamist branch of the Mormons. State officials claimed that the raid, which was triggered by anonymous phone calls from an underage girl to a domestic violence hotline, was based on evidence of widespread child sexual abuse. In a high-risk paramilitary operation, 439 children were removed from the custody of their parents and held until the Third Court of Appeals found that the state had overreached. Not only did the state fail to corroborate the authenticity of the hoax calls, but evidence reveals that Texas officials had targeted the FLDS from the outset, planning and preparing for a confrontation.Saints under Siege provides a thorough, theoretically grounded critical examination of the Texas state raid on the FLDS while situating this event in a broader sociological context. The volume considers the raid as an exemplar case of a larger pattern of state actions against minority religions, offering comparative analyses to other government raids both historically and across cultures. In its look beyond the Texas raid, it provides compelling evidence of social intolerance and state repression of unpopular minority faiths in general, and the FLDS in particular.
Comments: (4)
Authis
If one is to believe that being an American citizen promises the inalienable right to Freedom of Religion, then he or she needs to read Saints under Siege. This volume gives a glimpse into a forceful government raid on the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) in 2008 at their religious community in Eldorado, Texas. The group of authors give detail of the raid by exploring it from a historical, legal, religious, and media standpoint. The scholars provide histroical background on the FLDS church, as well as information on the steadily increasing government raids that have happened to other "cults" (for lack of a better standardized term) over the past decades. The majority of the book dedicates itself to the exaggerated threats and accusations about FLDS, as well as other minority religions, from state authorities. This book takes a sociological approach to show the cultral bias and intolerance of abhorred religions. Authors acknowledge the nonviolent nature of the FLDS religious community, as well as accounting for the Texas government's quickness to exert a full fledge military attack on the community based off a claim that was later proven false. The authors did not leave out the media's zealous jump to paint the FLDS community as subversive across the newspapers and television.

Saints under Siege is an attempt to show the general public the true nature of the raid. The lack of critical evidence, the preemptive strike, and inflated accusations backed by ex-members and opponents, media, and military force victimized the FLDS, as had happened in previous accounts of government raids. The accredited authors give us reason to doubt our protection under the First Amendment and Free Exercise Clause.
Cerekelv
This so-called "scholarly" examination of the 2008 raid on the FLDS Yearning for Zion Ranch in Eldorado, Texas, arrived today--hot off the press. I was ashamed to read the chapters as each author attempts to posit a theoretical framework for the misinformation, fear, delusional thinking, historical extrapolations, and underlying hysteria of government agents who "overreacted" in authorizing the raid. This book hammers the reader, again and again, that the raid was set in motion by an "unstable" young woman without foundation, by decades of social brainwashing by mainstream society, and by an underlying desire to victimize a God-fearing group of FLDS faithful who wanted nothing more than to live in peace. Nothing could be further from established facts repeatedly revealed through dozens and dozens and dozens of written accounts, court testimonies, and the documents of the key players themselves. This would include Warren Jeffs' private documents of his own actions, including child rape.

Despite this, the authors dispute that any threats to children existed and blame the State of Texas and the U.S. government for mounting an attack on the FLDS Texas compound. They gloss over the dozens of underage girls at YFZ who were found to be married, pregnant, or already having children. The authors do not include information as to how the FLDS members switched children and parents around and denied family bonds to avoid DNA testing to establish underage marriages and sexual activity. They do not give any credence to how the FLDS families defied Child Protective Services and the State of Texas. They do not calculate the millions and millions of dollars it cost the State of Texas in its attempt to create protection of underage girls being used for sex. They do not legitimize any of the already mentioned dozens and dozens of narratives of abuse and violence and forced labor written by women (and men) who suffered at the hands of FLDS yet who managed to escape the long reach of Warren Jeffs' malignant criminal enterprise.

This is the FLDS and Jeffs' longstanding crime: using underage girls as a means of exchange for increasing power among elderly men, and exiling surplus young males to complete abandonment. Under Jeffs, younger and younger females were drafted into quick marriages in order to enhance the private empires of the aging men. The families of the underage females were almost without fail too fearful to deny Jeffs his constant pick of the litters of prepubescent girls. Yet the authors here ignore these established realities and blame those who attempted to rescue underage victims.

Neither do these authors acknowledge the hideous accounts of the verified efforts by Warren Jeffs' actions to destroy longstanding families of the faithful by reassigning them--at whim. Entire families of wives and children were awarded to Jeffs' closest henchmen in order to control those who might challenge Jeffs' control. The husbands and fathers of these stolen families were cast into lives of banishment and endless repent without forgiveness. They gloss over Jeffs' manipulative strategies of seizing control of FLDS, including how he and his father Rulon eliminated the group of apostolic advisers who oversaw critical decisions for decades. In the Jeffs's upset of the directing body of advisers, the two established "one-man rule," which granted them, in succession, absolute power over every member's life.

These authors also fail to mention that the FLDS was on a hell-bent course toward (the now thankfully jailed-for-life) prophet Warren Jeff's fulminating obsession with blood atonement (the gift of murder to those who have sinned), the blood atonement as well as child rape for which the YFZ temple was being built. The authors condemn authorities who feared that Jeffs might take his followers down the path of death, much as Jim Jones, yet those who escaped tell of how worried insiders became increasingly fearful and would whisper to each other, "Don't drink the Kool-Aid." The authors of this book fail to mention how Jeffs worked assiduously to have an on-site incinerator built at the YFZ ranch, one capable of temperatures so high as to burn human bodies, not just debris or refuse. The engineer charged with installing it became so spooked by Jeffs' intentions that he refused to complete the job of installing this deadly incinerator; he was summarily expelled from FLDS. The authors deftly omit critical facts that drove the State of Texas to move toward protection of the innocent. Instead, they work hard to buttress the position of the FLDS as a group merely attempting to practice its God-given right to religion, and that mainstream society has an axe to grind against their different "lifestyle."

Sadly, the authors fail to acknowledge that FLDS was in the final throes of its downward spiral, that it had devolved into nothing more than a group seized by a power-hungry sociopath, Warren Jeffs. How it will fare now, with Jeffs and most of his aging gang of pedophiles now in prison is yet to be determined. However, I do not believe the conclusion of these authors: that the state and government attempts to stop child abuse and rape only solidified and further strengthened the resolve of the good FLDS faithful, made them stronger to fight for their rights. This book is a shameful, brown-nosing effort to euphemize the decades of lascivious excesses that FLDS perpetrated, for the crimes finally brought to a head, and brought to an end, under the cruel and perverse leadership of Jeffs. I have read dozens of FLDS and LDS accounts and am familiar with the tenets of both sects. If you wish to have facts distorted before your eyes, and to spend your time parsing abstract theories that are drawn to defend the indefensible, then this is the book to buy. It should be titled: "Smoke and Mirrors." This book is a shameful, unworthy attempt to whitewash pedophilia, forced labor, and criminal activity.

If you are even remotely interested in the inner workings of the FLDS, so far much better to buy the remarkable and detailed books by Carolyn Jessop, Elissa Wall, Kim Taylor, Stephen Singular, Irene Spencer, Sam Brower, Andrea Moore-Emmet, Debra Weyermann, Brent Jeffs, Susan Ray Schmidt, and even the so-called "apostate" Flora Jessop. These authors have lived it, suffered through the nightmare of it, and somehow lived to tell. All of their works are available on Amazon, and each of these books gives clear and documented insight into the staggering criminal enterprise that FLDS ran under the dark cloak of Warren Jeffs and his predecessors. These are the books that tell the story from those who have vowed not to be silenced through terror, fear, retribution, and abandonment.
Arcanescar
After reading this book, I see that it is written from a social scientist's view point. This book is a study of the sociological happenings that occurred surrounding the raid on the FLDS. The opinions of the contributors are given only as experts in the field of social science studies specifically narrowing in on one new religious movements' treatment by the government and society. To establish validity to this opinion, on pages 256-257 the credentials of the authors are briefly described and easily collaborated using a search engine such as Google.

As far as the research and quality of the information given, I feel it was empirically discovered and reported as unbiased as possible. The neutrality of the observations and theories within this book are both essential for the accuracy of the reports given. This book was not a FLDS "insider" tale but more to show the development of the social atmosphere that contributed to the raid on the FLDS.

Many facts were stated yet I did not read any support for Warren Jeffs or the abuse of children/women. To say that every FLDS is either an abuser or a victim is like saying every person from New York is either hateful or has been mugged. If you are interested in enlightening yourself about the social environment during and surrounding the raid on the FLDS this is a educational read.
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