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eBook Splendid Land, Splendid People: The Chickasaw Indians to Removal epub

by James R. Atkinson

eBook Splendid Land, Splendid People: The Chickasaw Indians to Removal epub
  • ISBN: 0817350330
  • Author: James R. Atkinson
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Alabama Press; 1 edition (December 5, 2003)
  • Pages: 380 pages
  • ePUB size: 1886 kb
  • FB2 size 1594 kb
  • Formats docx lrf lit doc


Before the Chickasaws were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, the heart of the Chickasaw Nation was located east of the . The people were also termed "splendid" and described by documents of the 1700s as "tall.

Before the Chickasaws were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, the heart of the Chickasaw Nation was located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi. Their lands had been called "splendid and fertile" by French governor Bienville at the time they were being coveted by early European settlers.

Splendid Land, Splendid People book. Before the Chickasaws were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, the heart of the Chickasaw Nation was located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi.

By James R. Atkinson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2004. The Chickasaws adapted early to English trade, which dominated their relations with European powers and other tribes until American independence. Enmity toward the Choctaws, whom they captured and traded as slaves to the English, led to protracted warfare through the first half of the eighteenth century. Simultaneously, the Chickasaws faced the Choctaws' French allies. The French attacked from the south and coordinated attacks by northern French and Indians.

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Splendid Land, Splendid People. The Chickasaw Indians to Removal. Published December 5, 2003 by University Alabama Press.

The Chickasaw Campaign of 1739 was a continuation of the Chickasaw Wars pursued by the French in Louisiana. Atkinson, James R. (2004). Splendid Land, Splendid People. University of Alabama Press. In 1739 the French prepared extensively, but failed to engage the Chickasaw beyond some half-hearted skirmishing, and finally accepted a negotiated peace. After the 1736 disasters of Ogoula Tchetoka and Ackia, Upper and Lower Louisiana were still separated by the obstinate Chickasaw. Céloron allowed his Indians to do what they would, and meanwhile remained open to any offers of peace. After several days of useless skirmishing, negotiations were opened.

Before the Chickasaws were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, the heart of the Chickasaw Nation was located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi Full description.

Memorably described are the strength of women like Sally Buchanan in stations fortified against Indian attack, the emergence of. .

An entire bygone world comes to life, and with it the smell of strong whiskey, the clippety-clop of horses, and the haunts of ghosts. Все результаты Поиска книг Google »

Provides the first comprehensive history of the Chickasaw tribe while they occupied their original motherland, located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi.

Provides the first comprehensive history of the Chickasaw tribe while they occupied their original motherland, located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi.

Before the Chickasaws were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, the heart of the Chickasaw Nation was located east of the Mississippi River in the upper watershed of the Tombigbee River in what is today northeastern Mississippi. Their lands had been called "splendid and fertile" by French governor Bienville at the time they were being coveted by early European settlers. The people were also termed "splendid" and described by documents of the 1700s as "tall, well made, and of an unparalleled courage. . . . The men have regular features, well shaped and neatly dressed; they are fierce, and have a high opinion of themselves."

The progenitors of the sociopolitical entity termed by European chroniclers progressively as Chicasa, Chicaca, Chicacha, Chicasaws, and finally Chickasaw may have migrated from west of the Mississippi River in prehistoric times. Or migrating people may have joined indigenous populations. Despite this longevity in their ancestral lands, the Chickasaw were the only one of the original "five civilized tribes" to leave no remnant community in the Southeast at the time of removal.

Atkinson thoroughly researches the Chickasaw Indians, tracing their history as far back as the documentation and archaeological record will allow. He historicizes from a Native viewpoint and outlines political events leading to removal, while addressing important issues such as slave-holding among Chickasaws, involvement of Chickasaw and neighboring Indian tribes in the American Revolution, and the lives of Chickasaw women.

Splendid Land, Splendid People will become a fundamental resource for current information and further research on the Chickasaw. A wide audience of librarians, anthropologists, historians, and general readers have long awaited publication of this important volume.

Comments: (4)
Golkis
Love it
Skilkancar
This is perhaps the best of the written Chickasaw history. The story of "The Unconquered and the Unconquerable" is inspiring and admirable. There is much to consider about the wisdom of the choices and directions taken by this country. As the "chickens are coming home to roost", we would do well to read and digest another way to think. Highly recommended!
Ramsey`s
Thoroughly researched and written by James Atkinson, a retired historian and archaeologist who studied the Chickasaw for most of his professional career, this book is a must have for any scholarly library. Using both historical and archaeological data, the author provides an excellent comprehensive history of the Chickasaw Indians. This book is a must have for archaeologists and historians working in Mississippi and the southeastern United States. Anyone interested in the Chickasaw will certainly benefit from reading this book.
Bremar
This is probably the best available book on the Chickasaw, the author is obviously an incredibly intelligent and accomplished historian as well as archaeologist, and critically reviews seemingly every scrap of documentation that survives about these people. With that being said, this book is fairly dry at times, as much of the text is listing of facts, criticism of statements by other authors, and often reads as a sourcebook for other researchers, rather than an introduction for the unacquainted but interested. However, this criticism is minor, and is easily dismissed by the sheer power of the documentation and analysis of cause and effect through time provided by Atkinson. The most important purpose that this book serves is to forcefully dispel the notion of a romantic past for the noble Chickasaw in their homelands in North Mississippi. Atkinson's extremely diligent and methodical research exposes the reality of the past of a people who were both harshly oppressed, and the oppressors of others. Large scale slave-raiding by Chickasaws, and chronic warfare rooted in status acquisition that both predates, and postdates European contact, all show that the tribes of the Southeast, including much or most of the Chickasaws, were, paradoxically, both heavily resistant to and actively involved in the colonization process by European powers. Over time, this lead to the inadvertent liquidation of their own standing in the region, and eventually, the bizarrely banal, political and protracted Removal process in the 1840's. Atkinson shows that the story is always tragically complicated, and that the Chickasaws ultimately came out of the chaos as the losers. This is not to say he does not obviously admire the group or their accomplishments, quite the contrary, he titles the book after a European account that described the Mississippi countryside, and the Chickasaw living in it, as "Splendid Land, Splendid People," and includes a cover illustration by his own hand of how an Early Historic Chickasaw warrior must have appeared. For its candor, and its quality, this is an essential work for everyone who conducts archaeological or historical work in the state of Mississippi, and really, in the rest of the Southeast overall.
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