» » This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library)

eBook This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library) epub

by Drew Gilpin Faust

eBook This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library) epub
  • ISBN: 0375703837
  • Author: Drew Gilpin Faust
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (January 6, 2009)
  • Pages: 346 pages
  • ePUB size: 1157 kb
  • FB2 size 1136 kb
  • Formats rtf doc azw rtf


Drew Faust’s brilliant new book, This Republic of Suffering, builds profoundly from the opening discussion of. .Most Civil War books are about great battles and specific generals. Drew Gilpin Fast's book, This Republic of Suffering, covers something much more personal.

Drew Faust’s brilliant new book, This Republic of Suffering, builds profoundly from the opening discussion of the Christian ideal of the good death to the last harrowing chapters on the exhumation, partial identification, reburial and counting of the Union dead. In the end one can only conclude, as the author does, that the meaning of the Civil War lies in death itself: in its scale, relentlessness, and enduring cultural effects.

During the war, approximately 620,000 soldiers lost their lives. An extremely grim, if absorbing, book. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. This book explores the impact of this enormous death toll from every angle: material, political, intellectual, and spiritual. Faust takes a look at how both sides in the American Civil War treated the issue of their dead; he focuses mostly, though not exclusively, on the dead soldiers.

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During the Civil War 620,000 soldiers lost their lives. The equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. This Republic of Suffering explores the impact of the enormous death toll from every angle: material, political, intellectual, and spiritual

During the Civil War 620,000 soldiers lost their lives. This Republic of Suffering explores the impact of the enormous death toll from every angle: material, political, intellectual, and spiritual. Drew Gilpin Faust delineates the ways death changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation. She describes how survivors mourned and how a deeply religious culture reconciled the slaughter with its belief in a benevolent God.

Mobile version (beta). This Republic of Suffering - Death and the American Civil War. Faust Drew Gilpin. Download (epub, . 2 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Drew Gilpin Faust, the president of Harvard .

Drew Gilpin Faust, the president of Harvard, has written an extraordinary new book about the enormous loss of human life in the Civil War - 620,000 men, North and South. And she continues: The work of death was Civil War America’s most fundamental and most demanding undertaking.

In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only indi. More than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives in the American Civil War. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million

In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only indi. In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent God.

In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only . This is a powerful book that deals with one aspect of the Civil War in a very different context than normal-death.

In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief. Many books speak of the sanguinary nature of the Civil War, death due to battlefield trauma as well as death due to disease, accident, and so on. But this book, written by Drew Gilpin Faust, addresses death on a much broader basis.

Drew Gilpin Faust is president of Harvard University, where she also holds the Lincoln Professorship in History. Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study from 2001 to 2007, she came to Harvard after twenty-five years on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. An equivalent proportion of .

In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent Go.

More than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives in the American Civil War. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent God. Throughout, the voices of soldiers and their families, of statesmen, generals, preachers, poets, surgeons, nurses, northerners and southerners come together to give us a vivid understanding of the Civil War's most fundamental and widely shared reality.

Comments: (7)
ℓo√ﻉ
This is a monumentally important book about American religious beliefs, and the cultural and familial traditions deeply affected by the mass deaths and carnage of the Civil War. The author lays a sensitive and profound foundation of the religious meaning of death before and during the outbreak of the war. The beloved cultural and familial traditions were such that when the time came, each soul required family support to die a "good death". This entailed carefully tending to the dying, aiding (if necessary) and witnessing his/her verbal readiness to meet God. As the war became more brutal and overwhelming, burial traditions broke down. With tens of thousands of men away from home, the military was unprepared to bury, much less record, massive deaths for what all thought would be a short war. Most men died without family, although soldiers wounded on the field still tried to die a "good death" if they survived long enough and had a witness to tell their family. Others died instantly with nothing left to bury. Others were buried by military buddies, but without a lasting marker. Others were piled together in quickly dug pits for shallow burial. And for every son, brother, father, etc., a family was left behind, devastated in its tortured grieving: did he die a "good death", where is he buried, is he truly dead, and how could God allow such brutality and carnage - on both sides ("... how could God be on both sides?") Many came to question their religion and the existence of God. Military burials changed after Lincoln's address, giving us Gettysburg National Cemetery, and then others. Garden-like, well-maintained, burial location without regard to rank. The aftermath of so much bloodshed on families was extensive in most churches and faiths, also thoroughly researched by the author.

This review is very much a 5 star and would have been a 6 if I could have. Will read it again.
Gavinrage
This was a fantastic book, though sometimes hard to stomach. Most Civil War books are about great battles and specific generals. Drew Gilpin Fast's book, This Republic of Suffering, covers something much more personal. The tremendous change that swept the United States due to the horrendous number of war dead. The US had never experienced anything like this; especially not in a short four year period.

Gilpin Faust covers a number of issues related to how Americans dealt with death. There was the issue of whether the relative had a "good" death, meaning essentially they were ready to face their maker. There was identification and burial of war dead. Many were lucky to be able to identify dead loved ones. Many others were not so lucky, and so had to take solace that their loved ones were buried with comrades. Gilpin Faust discusses the different ways each side dealt with war dead. The north had the advantage in being able to identify and transport back war dead because of resources. The south was stretched thin.

All round this was a fantastic book, touching on a little discussed or studied aspect of our great civil war. I highly recommend this book.
Terr
This book examines the Civil War dead: their vast numbers (over six hundred thousand), how they died, the significance of their deaths. I had expected it to be a grim yet fascinating account. Others must have found it so: the book was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. I, however, found it less engaging than the subject matter suggested. Despite notable quotes and haunting incidents, there was a flatness to the book, at least for me.... One of the sections that I found comparatively interesting discussed Civil War authors including Ambrose Bierce, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman, and left me far more eager to read their work than to finish "This Republic of Suffering."
Malodred
This is two books - a series of essays on aspects of death in and around The Civil War; and, chapters on the how of identification, location, retrieval and reburial of the 600,000 of our fellow citizens who spent their all in the great event of our national story.

Faust describes attitudes toward death prior to The Civil War - particularly the concept of the "good death" and dying well. His book spends much of its ink on describing how various Americans reacted to the death of loved ones in service and the trauma that death away from home, often with the remains lost or in unmarked graves had on the families and loved ones who watched their men go to war. Walt Whitman's melancholy and missionary zeal as he provided comfort to the wounded and dying during the last years of the war is recounted to poetically frame the effect such continual suffering had on individuals and the nation. A host of unknown American's diary reminiscences are also used to underscore the effect of mass carnage and individual loss as experienced by loved ones.

A little nation with a heretofore little army was not prepared to deal with the mass casualties produced by The Civil War. The author describes the haphazard nature of body disposal and grave marking that attended most of the conflict. The national government had to invent systems of dealing with the great amount of wounded produced by vicious battle and this took understandable priority over the care of the dead. This lack of planning and organization meant that a generation of Americans who would have to deal with the tragedy of loss would also have to suffer the extra emotional burden of not knowing where their loved one remained near the battle that saw their demise or which one of the vast number of graves whose location was known but whose remains were not did contain their husband, son or brother.

The war did, in its aftermath, spur major efforts to locate, rebury and commemorate the fallen. This had the assistance of bureaucracy for northern dead; for the southern fallen, volunteer societies tried to assist in appropriate treatment of their lost sons.

The book was hit or miss for me. I thought the chapters dealing with reaction to loss and suffering were somewhat repetitive and ended up often underscoring the author's points over and over again. This sense of loss is described in many histories of the conflict and while the author's focus gave it a greater scope than other works, it didn't really provide anything new to this reader. Personally, I found interesting and learned a lot about efforts to deal with the dead and establish the national military cemeteries that I had not encountered before. The chapters dealing with those issues were more interesting to me and I suspect would be for most Civil War buffs.
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