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eBook The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present (Center Books) epub

by Karl Raitz,Michael N. McConnell,Gabrielle M. Lanier,Geraldine Wojno Kiefer,James K. Bryant II,Kenneth W. Keller,Ann E. McCleary,Warren R. Hofstra

eBook The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present (Center Books) epub
  • ISBN: 0813928850
  • Author: Karl Raitz,Michael N. McConnell,Gabrielle M. Lanier,Geraldine Wojno Kiefer,James K. Bryant II,Kenneth W. Keller,Ann E. McCleary,Warren R. Hofstra
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press; 1st Edition edition (May 12, 2010)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • ePUB size: 1379 kb
  • FB2 size 1883 kb
  • Formats docx doc txt azw


After the war the Valley Road was essential to the recovery of western Virginia

After the war the Valley Road was essential to the recovery of western Virginia. US Route 11 and Interstate 81 now carry the traffic. There are eight chapters in the book; the 30 page fifth chapter that covers 1836 to 1865 is entitled 'Strategy and Sublimity: A Gallery of Valley Pike Images during the Civil War'. For anyone who reads and studies Civil War history, 'The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present' offers much in every chapter. The mindset aand cultural heritage of Virginia troops from the Shenanhoah Valley is revealed on nearly every page.

Also included are chapt The Great Valley Road of Virginia chronicles the story of one of America's oldest, most .

Also included are chapt The Great Valley Road of Virginia chronicles the story of one of America's oldest, most historic, and most geographically significant roads. Also included are chapters about the towns supported by the road as well as the relationship of physical geography (the lay of the land) to the engineering of the road.

Professor Warren R Hofstra; Karl Raitz; Michael N McConnell. University of Virginia Press.

Assiduous readers of The Great Valley Road of Virginia may suffer from a surfeit of information, but they .

Assiduous readers of The Great Valley Road of Virginia may suffer from a surfeit of information, but they will likely never again regard the Shenandoah Valley in the same way after completing it. The volume originated in a 2004 conference and manifests the unevenness of all such collections. 1 1 today with the insights to read down through the horizons of cultural layering for a better appreciation of the Shenandoah Valley's complex history" (p. 7). The Great Valley Road of Virginia is too heavy to accompany such travelers.

Bibliographic Details. We guarantee the condition of every book as it¿s described on the Abebooks web sites.

The Great Valley Road of Virginia" chronicles the story of one of America's oldest, most historic, and most geographically significant roads. Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability. Bibliographic Details. Title: The Great Valley Road of Virginia:.

The Great Valley Road of Virginia : Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present.

Allen G. Noble Book Award, Pioneer American Society (2010)

Allen G. Noble Book Award, Pioneer American Society (2010). The Great Valley Road of Virginia chronicles the story of one of America’s oldest, most historic, and most geographically significant roads.

Are you sure you want to remove The great Valley Road of Virginia from your list? The great Valley Road of Virginia. Shenandoah landscapes from prehistory to the present. by Warren R. Hofstra. Strategy and sublimity : a gallery of valley pike images during the Civil War, Geraldine Wojno Kiefer & James K. Bryant III. The best thoroughfare in the South, Kenneth W. Keller. The turnpike towns, Ann E. McCleary. 11 and a modern geography of culture and connection, Karl Raitz. Includes bibliographical references and index.

When Jackson saw Harry he closed the book instantly . It was a noble landscape,that of the valley between the blue mountains.

When Jackson saw Harry he closed the book instantly, and put it on theshelf. He had seen in the eyes of his aide that he was coming with nocommon message. Harry through the maternal line was,like most Kentuckians, of Virginia descent, and even here in Winchesterhe had found cousins, more or less removed it was true, but it waskinship, nevertheless, and they had made the most of it. It would havebeen easier for him were strangers instead of friends to see theirretreat. Before him stretched lowhills, covered here and there with fine groups of oak or pine withoutundergrowth.

Re-examining prehistory - Books that altered the archaeological landscape. While tourists appreciate the landscape of Corsica, they do not know its history and prehistory. September 1998 · Archaeology. A prehistory of the north: Human settlement of the higher latitudes. April 2006 · Geoarchaeology. Lucille Lewis Johnson. Its prehistory and protohistory is described and illustrated here. Settlement can be dated back to the seventh millenium BC.


The Great Valley Road of Virginia chronicles the story of one of America’s oldest, most historic, and most geographically significant roads. Emphasized throughout the chapters is a concern for landscape character and the connection of the land to the people who traveled the road and to permanent residents, who depended upon it for their livelihoods. Also included are chapters about the towns supported by the road as well as the relationship of physical geography (the lay of the land) to the engineering of the road. More than one hundred maps, photographs, engravings, and line drawings enhance the book’s value to scholars and general readers alike.

Published in association with the Center for American Places

Comments: (7)
Iaran
There is more to learn more about the Shenandoah Valley than how to get to the parks. This is a community on the outskirts of DC and suffering like many other rural areas, boosted in part by DC commuters and the national parks, but still suffering from the general job loss that has his non-college-educated people. It's shaped and formed in great part by the lay of the land, and this is the best book for understanding that.
Dagdalas
The Great Valley is one of America's most significant landforms. It stretches from New York to Alabama. One cannot understand the early settlement of our Nation without considering its role in promoting migration to the mid-west and to the south. Wheras the folded Appalachains formed a significant barrier to westward movement, the valley provided a relatively barrier free route to settlers seeking to own land in the west etc. This book features many essays ( 8) depicting the evolution of the Great Wagon Road through the valley. Today this route is used in part by Interstate 81. Earlier it was US 11. The essays are all written by noted historians and geographers. Topics include: The Lay of the Land, The Turnpike Towns, and an Early Road to the West. All of these will prove informative and interesting to the reader. You'll enjoy this book.
Ganthisc
It is a worthy addition to my knowledge of the Valley communications.
Acebiolane
Fascinating history of the Shenandoah Valley Route 11 which runs over Natural Bridge and was a major wagon route for pioneers traveling to settle the west when our nation was young.
playboy
This book is not a travel guide. It is not an architecture guide. It is not a narrative history.

It is an esoteric study of how settlement and transportation patterns in the Valley of Virginia (or the Shenandoah Valley) evolved over time, leading to what we have today. In fact, it is EXACTLY what the title states, essentially, the study of a road as it evolved from a colonial wagon trail into the mighty Interstate 81.

Interesting for demographers, town planners, and transportation historians, this book holds little appeal for narrative historians, architectural historians, or the general public.
Keth
For someone who lives near many of the places explored in this book, it was a joy to read -- mostly. The scholarly chapters are in general well-written and well-illustrated with current and period photographs and artwork. References are excellent, as is the writing but for the editor's weird and offputting word choices. Mr. Raitz seems to be of the school that believes finding an awkward Latin word to supplant a short, clear Anglo-Saxon word is somehow good writing. It is not. Two examples suffice. Whenever the words "cut" or "cutting" are called for, Mr. Raitz uses "incise" and "incising." Valleys are not cut by rivers, they are "incised." When two things are weaved together or blended, they are "interdigitated." This is not merely pompous, but deliberately confusing. I have some 7,000 books and journals in my library, and I daresay I would not find that word anywhere but in dictionaries. Clear English writing, even when it is scholarly writing, demands word choices that will be understood easily, and that means using a suitable balance of Anglo-Saxon and Latin/Greek words. I suggest that Mr. Raitz read some of Winston Churchill's work to see how beautiful English can be when this balance is achieved. Try to reserve incise for teeth and interdigitate for fingers.
Ffrlel
The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present, Warren R. Hofstra et al., University of Virginia Press, 320 pages, extensive maps, photographs, charts and illustrations, notes, index, 2010, $50.00.

'The Great Valley Road of Virginia' contains historic landscapes from frontier to modern times. It is not a coffee table book but is an fine combination of academic history and popular culture. An accessible narrative with a foundation of solid research in local, state and regional documents contains much on the American Civil War and ranges from the Shenandoah Valley's prehistory to the presetn.

Native Americans had used this great Appalachian valley for kinship and commerce travelling before Europeans began their settlements. A segment of a path that began in southeastern Pennsylvania and ended in northern Georgia, the Valley Road was essential to Native American communities. Americans used the Valley Road as a route through the Cumberland Gap to Tennessee and Kentucky.

When the Valley Road became a turnpike and played a vital role in the economic and social life of Virginia and the South before the Civil War. During the war it was the focus of two great Confederate military campaigns: Jackson's in 1862 and Early's in 1864. After the war the Valley Road was essential to the recovery of western Virginia. US Route 11 and Interstate 81 now carry the traffic.

There are eight chapters in the book; the 30 page fifth chapter that covers 1836 to 1865 is entitled 'Strategy and Sublimity: A Gallery of Valley Pike Images during the Civil War'. There are 24 illustrations selected by an associate professor of art; the text is written by an associate professor of history. Both are on the faculty of at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia. For anyone who reads and studies Civil War history, 'The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present' offers much in every chapter. The mindset aand cultural heritage of Virginia troops from the Shenanhoah Valley is revealed on nearly every page. CWL recommends this book to those who wish to understand what Virgina's western soldiers brought to the war.
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