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eBook The World of Maluku: Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period epub

by Leonard Y. Andaya

eBook The World of Maluku: Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period epub
  • ISBN: 0824814908
  • Author: Leonard Y. Andaya
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (July 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 306 pages
  • ePUB size: 1215 kb
  • FB2 size 1461 kb
  • Formats azw mbr doc lrf


Leonard Y. Andaya is currently professor of history at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The world view of the Malukans held that peace and prosperity would follow only if the original four "pillars" or four original kingdoms lasted.

Leonard Y. The Portuguese, Spaniards, and Dutch each intervened, had their days of power, and saw them wane. Over time, the four kingdoms became two--again Ternate and Tidore--which fought each other, but also intermarried and maintained a kind of strange dualism.

In The World of Maluku, Leonard Y. Andaya offers an inspiring attempt to identify the fundamental conceptual constructs that determined boundaries, conceptual and geographical, and legitimate behavior in Malukan history

In The World of Maluku, Leonard Y. Andaya offers an inspiring attempt to identify the fundamental conceptual constructs that determined boundaries, conceptual and geographical, and legitimate behavior in Malukan history. Malukan myths, he explains, formed a unified world of "family" out of the many islands and ethnolinguistic communities of the eastern Indonesian archipelago. Maluku's unity and prosperity depended upon the maintenance of dualism, especially that of Ternate and Tidore, and the replication of the number four.

Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period. 7 Though the clove was being traded from a very early period, a sig nificant change occurred in the late fourteenth century. University of hawaii press honolulu. To my parents, Doris and Alejo.

by Leonard Y. Andaya. It was the coveted trinity of spices - clove, nutmeg, and mace - that first lured European and other foreigners to Maluku (the Moluccas) in eastern Indonesia. There, between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, Europeans recorded their activities and observations in minute detail.

ISBN 10: 0824814908 ISBN 13: 9780824814908. Publisher: University of Hawaii Press, 1993.

Andaya, Leonard Y. LC Subject Headings: Maluku (Indonesia)-History. Appears in Collections: Andaya, Leonard Y. Andaya, Leonard Y. Maluku (Indonesia)-Hawaii. Show full item record Recommend this item View Statistics. edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format. University of Hawai'i at Manoa Hamilton Library 2550 McCarthy Mall Honolulu, HI 96822.

The early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era. Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (. . Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (c. 1500), known as the Middle Ages, through the beginning of the Age of Revolutions (c. 1800) and is variously demarcated by historians as beginning with the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, the Renaissance period in Europe, the Muslim conquests in the Indian.

The World of Maluku: Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period (1993) Cambridge History of Early Modern Southeast Asia (with Barbara Watson Andaya, forthcoming).

The World of Maluku: Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period (1993). Leaves of the Same Tree: Trade and Ethnicity in the Straits of Melaka (2008). Cambridge History of Early Modern Southeast Asia (with Barbara Watson Andaya, forthcoming). edu/history/node/50 Official University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of History faculty page: Professor Leonard Andaya. Articles needing additional references from March 2011.

The World of Maluku encompasses three centuries of European presence in Maluku and critically evaluates a wide sweep .

The World of Maluku encompasses three centuries of European presence in Maluku and critically evaluates a wide sweep of Iberian and Dutch sources in an ambitious attempt to understand the intellectual milieu in which European and Malukan interactions took place. Leonard Andaya argues that a general Western conception of the center and periphery based on ancient classical and Christian European traditions underlay European views of the people of Maluku.

The World of Maluku: Eastern Indonesia in the Early Modern Period. By Leonard Y. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993. Pp. x, 306. Maps, Glossary, Bibliography, Index. National University of Singapore.

It was the coveted trinity of spices - clove, nutmeg, and mace - that first lured European and other foreigners to Maluku (the Moluccas) in eastern Indonesia. There, between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, Europeans recorded their activities and observations in minute detail. The descriptions of events and customs they left us, though colored by European assumptions, individual perceptions, and national concerns, represent the only written accounts of indigenous traditions.The World of Maluku encompasses three centuries of European presence in Maluku and critically evaluates a wide sweep of Iberian and Dutch sources in an ambitious attempt to understand the intellectual milieu in which European and Malukan interactions took place. Leonard Andaya argues that a general Western conception of the center and periphery based on ancient classical and Christian European traditions underlay European views of the people of Maluku. His own documentation of the changes and continuities that occurred in local societies supports a different interpretation of center-periphery relations that emphasizes the four principal Malukan kingdoms or "pillars" and the dualism between two centers, Ternate and Tidore. Prosperity will prevail, Malukans believed, as long as the four pillars and the proper dualism were maintained. By integrating this structure into his narrative, the author avoids a framework governed by European concerns and brings new significance to Malukan events described but only partially understood by European observers.This highly readable book is an important contribution to the historiography of Southeast Asia. It provides a deeper understanding of culture contact and will become a standard history of a relatively unknown and complex region.
Comments: (3)
Nayatol
I needed specific information on Maluku and 16th Century Eastern Indonesian history that just isn't out there. Or at least it doesn't seem to be readily available. This book was the only thing that seemed remotely available from an Indonesian perspective. Everything else was strongly biased by the European explorers who wrote their own chronicles. And this book alone seems to be in limited print. I'm glad that the high price I paid wasn't for nothing.
Beazerdred
If you are looking for a detailed history of the Maluku islands (also known in English as the Moluccas) in eastern Indonesia, you have come to the right place. This is the only academic study in English that I know of, the product of a great amount of research in archives in many countries. The Malukans themselves have not produced much in the way of written history, so Western authors have always been the ones to do it.
Andaya prefaces and underlines throughout the fact that the views of Europeans who came in contact with Maluku from 1512 to the beginning of the 19th century (the time period covered here) are formed by their own societies and their own cultures' view of Others. Hence, the comments and narratives of Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English visitors or colonial occupiers must be understood with this in mind. Of course, nobody, whether historian or anthropologist, can escape this caveat entirely.
The story of Maluku is one of a very strange rivalry of two tiny islands, neither of which is much bigger than a few towns put together here in eastern Massachusetts. Nevertheless they dominated the history of the area for centuries all because they happened to be the natural habitat of the clove tree, the only one in the world. If cloves also did grow on a few adjacent islands, it was the rulers of Ternate and Tidore who built ports and developed commercial ties with the trading networks that stretched as far as Syria even 1,700 years before our era. The two sultans of the two tiny islands sat at the center of a spice empire that connected to Malaya, India, Arabia, and ultimately Europe. It was the arrival of the latter that touched off a complex, violent period of history that is the subject of this book. The world view of the Malukans held that peace and prosperity would follow only if the original four "pillars" or four original kingdoms lasted. The Portuguese, Spaniards, and Dutch each intervened, had their days of power, and saw them wane. Over time, the four kingdoms became two---again Ternate and Tidore---which fought each other, but also intermarried and maintained a kind of strange dualism. Each required the other in order to be a whole. The two islands used the Europeans to fight their own battles, allying themselves with rival European powers. The Dutch insisted on a policy of clove tree eradication for decades---wasting enormous resources in a vain attempt to control the price by limiting the supply. Islam came late to the islands, arriving perhaps only a few years before the Europeans did and tried to spread Christianity. Both religions achieved a certain success, but the fighting was usually about power, wealth and prestige, not religion. Today Ternate holds 200,000 people while Tidore is considerably smaller. The myriad names of islands, of sultans, of local bigwigs, and European intruders may overwhelm the non-professional reader. OK, it's not bedtime reading, but it's a fascinating glimpse at a part of the world you really can't learn about except by reading THE WORLD OF MALUKU. It is an important addition to the history of Southeast Asia and of course, the world. And, I would conclude, a great feat of scholarship.
Burisi
It is probably the most thoroughly-researched, best-written history of Maluku (especially North Maluku) ever written. All historical events described are cross-referenced with the sources.
The book is remarkable in that it puts an emphasis on trying to describe the troublesome history of contact between Malukans and Europeans from the native as well as the colonial point of view.
Unfortunately this book can be very hard to find but is certainly worth the trouble!
Can't praise it highly enough...
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