» » Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground

eBook Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground epub

by Jonathan Steele

eBook Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground epub
  • ISBN: 1582437874
  • Author: Jonathan Steele
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Counterpoint (October 4, 2011)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1536 kb
  • FB2 size 1233 kb
  • Formats doc txt lrf azw


Most recently Steele has reported from the epicenter of the Taliban resurgence in Helmand.

He tracked the Soviet occupation and the communist regime of Najibullah, which held the Western-backed resistance at bay for three years after the Soviets left. Most recently Steele has reported from the epicenter of the Taliban resurgence in Helmand. Ghosts of Afghanistan turns a spotlight on the numerous myths about Afghanistan that have bedeviled foreign policy-makers and driven them to repeat earlier mistakes.

His book, Ghosts of Afghanistan: the Haunted Battleground analyses thirty years of Afghan history (London . Steele's book Socialism with a German Face (US: Inside East Germany, 1977) is a study of the Soviet Bloc country.

His book, Ghosts of Afghanistan: the Haunted Battleground analyses thirty years of Afghan history (London: Portobello Books, 2011, and San Francisco: Counterpoint, 2011). In between foreign assignments, he worked as a columnist for The Guardian on international affairs.

In Ghosts of Afghanistan, he turns a spotlight on the numerous myths about Afghanistan that have bedeviled foreign policy-makers and driven them to repeat earlier mistakes.

Afghanistan, Jonathan Steele writes in his new book, is full of ghosts. Perhaps the most damaging in his eyes is the myth that the destruction of the Taliban would eliminate the threat from the Arab terrorists who felled the twin towers in New York.

Ghosts of Afghanistan book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jeff Glor talks to Jonathan Steele about, "Ghosts of Afghanistan," a powerful book about Afghanistan's tortured recent .

Jeff Glor talks to Jonathan Steele about, "Ghosts of Afghanistan," a powerful book about Afghanistan's tortured recent history, and what it might take to turn things around. Jeff Glor: What inspired you to write the book? Jonathan Steele: An extraordinary exhibition on the Afghan war opened in central Moscow in 1991, two years after the Soviet Union withdrew its troops. The exhibition's disparate and rather clumsily assembled images made it obvious that it had put together by a committee rather than a single curator.

Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground. Steele, a veteran foreign correspondent for The Guardian, frames this exploration of the past three decades in Afghanistan by comparing the intervention of the Soviet Union in the 1980s with that of the United States in the first decade of this century.

Ghosts of Afghanistan: the haunted battleground by Jonathan Steele

Ghosts of Afghanistan: the haunted battleground by Jonathan Steele. Article in International Affairs 88(1):198-200 · January 2012 with 34 Reads. DOI: 1. 307/41428575.

Ghosts of Afghanistan turns a spotlight on the numerous myths about Afghanistan that have bedeviled foreign policy-makers and driven them to repeat earlier mistakes. Steele has conducted numerous interviews with ordinary Afghans, two of the country's Communist presidents, senior Soviet occupation officials, as well as Taliban leaders, Western diplomats, NATO advisers, and United Nations negotiators

A masterful blend of graphic reporting, illuminating interviews, and insightful analysis. Ghosts of Afghanistan is the first account of Afghanistan's turbulent recent history by an independent eyewitness.Jonathan Steele, an award-winning journalist and commentator, has covered the country since his first visit there as a reporter in 1981. He tracked the Soviet occupation and the communist regime of Najibullah, which held the Western-backed resistance at bay for three years after the Soviets left. He covered the arrival of the Taliban to power in Kabul in 1996, and their retreat from Kandahar under the weight of U.S. bombing in 2001. Most recently Steele has reported from the epicenter of the Taliban resurgence in Helmand.Ghosts of Afghanistan turns a spotlight on the numerous myths about Afghanistan that have bedeviled foreign policy-makers and driven them to repeat earlier mistakes. Steele has conducted numerous interviews with ordinary Afghans, two of the country's Communist presidents, senior Soviet occupation officials, as well as Taliban leaders, Western diplomats, NATO advisers, and United Nations negotiators.Comparing the challenges facing the Obama Administration as it seeks to find an exit strategy with those the Kremlin faced in the 1980s, Steele cautions that military victory will elude the West just as it eluded the Kremlin. Showing how and why Soviet efforts to negotiate an end to the war came to nothing, he explains how negotiations today could put a stop to the tragedies of civil war and foreign intervention that have afflicted Afghanistan for three decades.
Comments: (7)
Purestone
Jonathan Steele is "that guy" - the one who knows everyone, but never really comes up on the radar himself. Having spent several decades traveling to Afghanistan off and on, he seems to have interviewed nearly anybody who is anybody: he even interviewed the mujahid Hekmatyar by fax. His perspective is that of an experienced journalist who after decades of reporting wants to opine on the subjects he has worked on.

"Ghosts of Afghanistan" is organized around the chronological narrative of Mr Steele's visits to the region. He begins in earnest with the 1980s, focusing on the PDPA, from Karmal to Najibullah, the brief rule of the Mujahideen, the rule of the Taliban, and then the post 9/11 world in Afghanistan. The narrative is quite readable.

Mr Steele's telling of history avoids attributing change to broad movements; rather, he tends to attribute change to the choices of particular individuals, many of whom he met. This differentiates him from most academic historians. Mr Steele gives particular attention to western mythology about Afghanistan, such as the alleged defeat of the Soviets by the Mujahideen, and many claims that America abandoned Afghanistan after the Soviets left. The truth is not always flattering.

American readers will at multiple occasions be forced to grit their teeth as Mr Steele's British origin makes itself manifest. At one point he seems to suggest that America is cowardly for using air power, apparently preferring to see more Americans die on the ground. He could easily have made his point with more sensitivity - that air raids alienate and kill with less discrimination. His conclusion focuses in on the plight of the diaspora, which he says moved him the most because of the loss of their culture. To many readers this will seem like misplaced pity: the dead and suffering in Afghanistan most deserve our sorrow. His criticisms of General Petraeus seem unjustified and petty.

Yet this book's strength is its willingness to ask questions that others are less willing to ask: should we focus on women's rights when people are dying left and right? As he says, women's rights are more likely to be improved in peace than in war (many Afghan women agree). Yet he does not flinch from uncovering the truly awful situation that too many Afghan women experience. He is not afraid to praise Najibullah for being the last reasonable ruler of Afghanistan. And he is not afraid to suggest peace talks with the Taliban.

This book will reward reading; it also comes with a chronology, list of important persons, and a map.

Those interested in the larger global conflict against al-Qaeda are well advised to check out The Longest War: The Enduring Conflict between America and Al-Qaeda by Peter Bergen, the best book for those who will read just one book on the subject. Those interested in trying to get a more detailed look at Afghanistan's history, many tribes, languages, and regions should try Afghanistan: A Cultural and Political History (Princeton Studies in Muslim Politics) by Thomas Barfield. In the Graveyard of Empires: America's War in Afghanistan" by Seth Jones is a good recent book on Afghanistan as well.
Roru
If you read only one thing on Afghanistan this year, make sure it's this. Mr. Steele has condensed 30+ years of covering this rugged patch of country into one in-depth volume. The amount of scrupulous detail here is simply amazing, delivered with the modest nonchalance of truly great insight and analysis. This is the kind of volume that proverbially *should* be read by political and military leaders - but won't be, precisely because it calmly yet mercilessly slaughters all their illusions and vanity. There is no Santa Claus in Afghanistan.

When he says Afghanistan is the poorest country on earth, this is always debatable. Haiti and Somalia are equal candidates for bottom honors. Like most such places it's a concept more than a reality, held in place on the map only by the borders of its neighbors. One criticism: I wish he'd spent more time tying the economic interest with the political/military history. Afghanistan sits on top of one of the richest mineral caches on earth, and this was not just discovered a few years ago. Signs and hints of this wealth have been known for quite a while, and this must be added to all the strategic and geo-political concerns that have made it a global cauldron - with some of the earth's poorest, least comprehending people the usual victims of great power pride and righteousness.
Felhann
This book gives a history of Afghanistan's inception, and turmoiled history through many coups, the Russian invasion, and the current US led war. It summarizes the mindset of the various tribal factions to give better understanding into the mindset and traditions these people adhere to in religion, politics and the like. It helped me to understand why the Russian invasion, and the US led coalition have failed to change their political stance because of the differing belief systems that adorn the various regions within Afghanistan.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
For anyone seeking to understand why we got into Afghanistan and why it has taken so long to get out, this book tells it all. From the Russian occupation to the resurgence of the Taliban, the author offers a first hand account of the last 30 plus years in this troubled nation. He offers a way forward as well.
Mr_Jeйson
My daughter needed this for a college class on Afghanistan. Thought it was taught in class, she found it an enjoyable read on it's own.
eBooks Related to Ghosts of Afghanistan: The Haunted Battleground
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020