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eBook Chain Her by One Foot: The Subjugation of Native Women in Seventeenth-Century New France epub

by Karen Anderson

eBook Chain Her by One Foot: The Subjugation of Native Women in Seventeenth-Century New France epub
  • ISBN: 0415908272
  • Author: Karen Anderson
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (June 16, 1993)
  • Pages: 250 pages
  • ePUB size: 1149 kb
  • FB2 size 1603 kb
  • Formats lit mobi doc lrf


17th century, Wyandot women, Marriage - New France - History - 17th century, Montagnais women, Wyandot Indians - Missions, Sex role - New .

17th century, Wyandot women, Marriage - New France - History - 17th century, Montagnais women, Wyandot Indians - Missions, Sex role - New France - History - 17th century, Catholic converts - New France - History - 17th century, Montagnais Indians - Missions, Marriage, Catholic converts, Missions, Sex role, Femmes hurons - Histoire - 17e siècle, Hurons - Missions, Femmes hurons - Histoire - 17e siecle, Jesuites - Missions - Canada - Histoire - 17e siecle, Mariage - Canada - Histoire - 17e siecle, Role selon le sexe - Canada .

Women Karen Anderson explains how 2 native tribes could, in a span of 30 or so years, move from a culture of. .The Jesuits came to New France to bring a knowledge of Christianity to the natives.

Women Karen Anderson explains how 2 native tribes could, in a span of 30 or so years, move from a culture of equality between males and females where neither side dominated the other to a culture where women were submissive and obedient to their husbands even when they did not want to be. In the 16 and 17th centuries Christianity meant that men dominated and ruled the world and women were to be submissive to them. Women were thought of as weak and more easily led astray by the devil.

Before colonization, the Huron and Montagnais tribes lived in gender-egalitarian societies. The domination of women by men was only one effect of French with warfare, disease, famine and Jesuit h combined to destroy Indian culture and sexual equality

In this highly original volume of social history, Karen Anderson makes a provocative claim: the subjugation of.Anderson's is an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, feminist case study of the historical and political construction of gender and racial inequality.

At the outset of Chain Her By One Foot, Anderson poses two analytical goals: to explain the dramatic change of Huron and Montagnais women's status in the thirty years after the arrival of the French and, more generally, to confront the theoretical problem of identifying the causes o.

At the outset of Chain Her By One Foot, Anderson poses two analytical goals: to explain the dramatic change of Huron and Montagnais women's status in the thirty years after the arrival of the French and, more generally, to confront the theoretical problem of identifying the causes of women's subordination. The book clearly succeeds in the first task and contributes to other work on the second, more difficult on. - - Contemporary Sociology.

Chain her by one foot: the subjugation of women in seventeenth-century new france. The book discusses the exploitation of the Huron and Montagnais tribes and the decimation of these societies through disease, warfare, famine and the introduction of the fur trade. It shows how the missionaries changed the lives, attitudes and values of the native people, and how the determination of the Jesuits to replicate the society of France in New France and to make the "savages" deferent to God and Crown altered the egalitarian relationships of native society.

Anderson mines original sources, letters, diaries and clerical records to reconstruct the experience of women in French colonies in North America around the times of earliest settlement. AlexTheHunn, November 22, 2005.

I highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to know more about the damage done by Christian missionaries to peaceful egalitarian societies. Werner Krieglstein Professor of Philsophy. Recently Viewed and Featured.

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Chain Her by One Foot: The Subjugation of Native Women in Seventeenth-Century New France

Chain Her by One Foot: The Subjugation of Native Women in Seventeenth-Century New France. With this book the contributors have consolidated the effort of scholars in women's, gender and feminist history to highlight gender as an important analytical category in studies of the nation and nationalism. Nations and Nationalism. Ida Blom University of Bergen Karen Hagemann DAAD Visiting Professor for German and European Studies,Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto Dr. Catherine Hall University College London.

In this highly original volume of social history, Karen Anderson makes a provocative claim: the subjugation of women in seventeenth-century New France was linked with the brutal colonization of native Indian populations. Before colonization, the Huron and Montagnais tribes lived in gender-egalitarian societies. The domination of women by men was only one effect of French "civilization"--along with warfare, disease, famine and Jesuit proselytization--which combined to destroy Indian culture and sexual equality. Anderson's is an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, feminist case study of the historical and political construction of gender and racial inequality.
Comments: (6)
Jare
"Chain Her by One Foot" is an utterly impressive piece of scholarly research, chock full of intriguing, challenging ideas about the "subjugation of women in seventeenth-century New France" ... due to "the brutal colonization" of the Huron and Montagnais. The dense, somewhat repetitive nature of the argument makes this book a little challenging to read. As a book, "Chain Her by One Foot" would have benefited from some more graphics. In the interests of full disclosure, I am a woman, therefore a feminist, the woman owner of an archeological consulting company, therefore a feminist, a descendant of one of these seventeenth century encounters myself, and therefore recognize that this book speaks to the genealogy and community history quite broadly (pun intended) throughout North America. I thoroughly enjoyed Karen Anderson's synthesis that dramatized the shift from the gender-egalitarian societies of the indigenous Huron and Montagnais to a French civilization colonial culture dominated by males. I appreciate the availability of a scholarly work on New France and on the "subjugation of women", which as a bonus, is in English. The gift of this work is to present a thesis that challenges our world view and perspective on racial inequality.
Deorro
Chain Her by One Foot is an excellent scholarly examination of how the status of women in Huron and Montagnais societies changed shortly after contact with French missionaries. The main argument of the book states that in these two tribes, men and women had different roles but were equally valued. This, however, horrified the Christian missionaries who visited these tribes because they believed that God intended males to have a more exalted and powerful position than females. For this reason, as part of their general effort to convert Hurons and Montagnais to Christianity, they did everything in their power to convince the tribes to transform their views about hierarchy in general and gender roles in specific. Apparently, the Jesuit missionaries were successful since just a few decades after their arrival the status of women in these societies plummeted considerably. This is particularly striking in light of the fact that-unlike the Spaniards in other parts of the Americas-the French were not in a position to impose their own ideology by force since they never conquered these tribes. According to the author, the main reason why this was possible has to do with the fact that the Jesuits were preaching their message at a time when the Hurons' and Montagnais' world was falling apart. Diseases were decimating them, warfare was increasing in both frequency and intensity, and traditional remedies did not seem to solve these new problems. These phenomena created an environment of cultural chaos which made the tribes more receptive to any alternative way of making sense of their rapidly changing world. This is how the Jesuits' message began finding a receptive hear among them.

In the process of explaining how this transformation came into being, Anderson explores the history of the Jesuit order and the ideological roots of misogyny in the Western world. Because of her emphasis on the role that Christian values had in the colonization of Indian peoples, her work is in many ways reminiscent of the latter part of David Stannard's American Holocaust. Chain Her by One Foot, on the other hand, is diametrically opposed to Susan Sleeper-Smith's Indian Women and French Men, which argues that the status of Indian women was actually elevated by the spreading of Christianity. In my opinion, Anderson wins the argument hands down since the evidence she provides is much more convincing and less ambiguous. The only people who feel compelled to reject her carefully researched argument are individuals who are adamant about establishing the superiority of a Christian, Western world over that of "savage" Indians. Also, any individual who has issues with the notion that gender roles are not biologically determined may not like her conclusions.

One of the only minor faults I find with Chain Her by One Foot is that the author drags on her argument for much longer than she needs to. Her main thesis is repeated-with minimal paraphrasing-countless times throughout the book and similarly much of the material she presents ends up being fairly redundant. Lastly, I find a little disappointing the fact that she dedicates much more space to the Hurons but she writes very little that is specific to Montagnais culture and to their experience with the French. Other than that, great work.
Leceri
The Jesuit Relations (a series of reports which chronicled the history of the Jesuit missions in North America from 1632 through ca. 1760) are sometimes scorned as historical documents by modern scholars because of their obvious Christian/devotional overtones. Would that these same scholars took the same critical attitude toward works with obvious marxist overtones like "Chain Her By One Foot." Anderson's book is little more than an attempt to cherry pick anecdotes and shoe-horn stubborn facts to fit a political agenda--in this case, marxism/radical feminism.

Anderson claims that the task of the Jesuits in New France was to "introduce hierarchy, and thus domination and subjugation (into Native societies) where equality had previously existed." She posits that Native American societies such as the Montagnais and the Huron nations were egalitarian societies before the Jesuit missionaries arrived to introduce the subjugation of women. To anyone who has more than a passing familiarity with the primary sources from this period, this claim is ludicrous on its face. It is impossible to say that the lot of women did not improve dramatically with the arrival of the Jesuits. While it is true that women possessed some limited political and decision-making status, particularly among Iroquois confederacy, time and again in the early Relations, the day-to-day lives of Indian women are described as pure drudgery. They are considered as hardly better off than slaves. Their main responsibility was to keep the house, grow and prepare food, and mind the children--activities which are often described as anathema to radical feminists. During menses, women among the Montagnais were sequestered in special huts designed to keep them apart from the rest of the village. Men were wary of pregnant women and shunned them, believing them capable of causing disease or bad luck. Men among the Hurons and Iroquois often derided other men by calling them "women" and avoided doing "women's work" at all costs. There are examples of this even in some of the earliest chronicles of the explorer Samuel de Champlain, so such attitudes can hardly be ascribed to European influence. During one council, an Iroquois captain was quoted as belittling the Delaware nation, saying that because they had been defeated by the Iroquois, they had been made into women--"We have put the skirt on you." These few examples should suffice as a beginning refutation of Anderson's primary premise, but many more exist.

Though Anderson claims at the end of this book that we cannot blame Christianity or western culture for the subjection of women, much of this book smacks of intellectual hubris where the poor benighted Natives are too docile or foolish to withstand the devious conversion attempts of the Jesuits. Of course, the actual primary sources tell a much different story--where the Jesuits were resisted by some Indians to the point that the missionaries were brutally tortured and killed. Meanwhile, some Hurons, Montagnais, and members of other tribes eventually embraced Christianity only after a long period of debate, instruction, doubt, trial, and rejection by family and friends. Women were often the first to take up Christianity, many suffering ostracism in the process.

Thus, if you are looking for a flawed secondary resource with incomplete research and a blatant political bias, this book is perfect. If you want a more balanced treatment relying on actual extracts from the Jesuit Relations (in English translation), I recommend Women in New France: Extracts from the Jesuit Relations (Annals of Colonial North America).
Malodred
Ms. Anderson has added a scholarly and authentic voice to the research on the origins of male domination. I highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to know more about the damage done by Christian missionaries to peaceful egalitarian societies. I explore the same subject on my website...
Werner Krieglstein Professor of Philsophy
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