» » God's Secret Agents: Queen Elizabeth's Forbidden Priests and the Hatching of the Gunpowder Plot

eBook God's Secret Agents: Queen Elizabeth's Forbidden Priests and the Hatching of the Gunpowder Plot epub

by Alice Hogge

eBook God's Secret Agents: Queen Elizabeth's Forbidden Priests and the Hatching of the Gunpowder Plot epub
  • ISBN: 0007225687
  • Author: Alice Hogge
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (February 6, 2006)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • ePUB size: 1129 kb
  • FB2 size 1964 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf lit lrf


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The report of the Armada’s inadvertent flight north reached Queen Elizabeth as she was addressing her troops at Tilbury camp on 18 August, more than a week after the event

The report of the Armada’s inadvertent flight north reached Queen Elizabeth as she was addressing her troops at Tilbury camp on 18 August, more than a week after the event. But even this good news did not come rumour-free, for now the Duke of Parma and his army were said to be on their way across the Channel.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader. I believe all of this.

Once used as a site for archery tournaments and wrestling matches, by 1588 the fields had fallen victim to urban sprawl uilding throughout of garden house.

Once used as a site for archery tournaments and wrestling matches, by 1588 the fields had fallen victim to urban sprawl uilding throughout of garden houses and small cottages’. 1A description of one of these cottages remains. The ground floor contained a kitchen and a dining room. The first floor was given over to a chapel that doubled at night as a sleeping loft. The cellar beneath held sufficient storage space for logs, coal and beer barrels

God's Secret Agents: Quee. has been added to your Cart. This impartiality is why, when her chronology reaches the Gunpowder Plot, her own analysis of this confusing and critical event in English religious history is so convincing.

God's Secret Agents: Quee. Truth is more complicated than just picking a side and sticking to it.

God's Secret Agents is an examination of the clash between political necessity and religious belief in Elizabethan . Ms. Hogge takes us to the end for some of the key characters of the era, but of course the end of her book was not the end of religious strife.

God's Secret Agents is an examination of the clash between political necessity and religious belief in Elizabethan England. No - that sounds too dry and dutiful for such a fun and suspenseful read, a marvelous recreation of a momentous period. Hogge's prose is beautiful, her narrative flowing, and her analysis incisive.

God’s Secret Agents’ tells the story of Elizabeth’s ‘other’ England, a country at war with an unseen enemy, a country peopled – according to popular pamphlets and Government proclamations – with potential traitors, fifth-columnists and assassins

God’s Secret Agents’ tells the story of Elizabeth’s ‘other’ England, a country at war with an unseen enemy, a country peopled – according to popular pamphlets and Government proclamations – with potential traitors, fifth-columnists and assassins. And it tells this story from the perspective of that unseen ‘enemy’, England’s Catholics, a beleaguered, alienated minority, struggling to uphold its faith.

It was the first hint that God might be on the side of the English. The report of the Armada’s inadvertent flight north reached Queen Elizabeth as she was addressing her troops at Tilbury camp on 18 August, more than a week after the event. But in England no one mentioned Merlin’s intervention in international affairs and the English almanacs that year were strangely muted affairs, proffering the general observation that ‘Here and in the quarters following might be note. any strange events to happen which purposely are omitted in good consideration.

Comments: (7)
Ndlaitha
Alice Hogge has written, in her first book, a masterpiece of history, not only in the modern familiar sense of a brilliant artifact but also in the original sense of a "work by which a craftsman achieves the rank of a master". (from Online Etymology)

The earlier reviewers in this space have done such a fine job of recapitulating the book's main themes and events that any specific comments of mine would seem to be superfluous. I would, however, like to offer a few general observations in support of my enthusiasm.

God's Secret Agents is an examination of the clash between political necessity and religious belief in Elizabethan England. No - that sounds too dry and dutiful for such a fun and suspenseful read, a marvelous recreation of a momentous period. Ms. Hogge's prose is beautiful, her narrative flowing, and her analysis incisive. She is scrupulously faithful to the sources and spirit of the time, and yet manages to illuminate the concerns of our present. Her book is a two way mirror on the past.

Philip Roth once said that "the terror of the unforeseen is what the science of history hides." It is a tribute to the quality of Alice Hogge's historical imagination that her rendering of the facts has enabled the reader to appreciate the significance of events while experiencing a bit of their original terror.
Maldarbaq
Ms. Hogge's book was recommended to me by a dear friend and I am happy that i bought it and read it. Opened my eyes to the truly brutal persecution of Roman Catholics in Elizabeth I's reign something that I had been aware of but not in this detail and extent. Very balanced portrayal. The author doesn't set out to demonize just show the time as it was.
Gravelblade
A very good investigation of the lives, motives, and trials of the priests and rercusants, turncoats and spies during the reign of Elizabeth I. This is Hogge's first book, and it's an excellent one.
MARK BEN FORD
Got this for a Renaissance class.
Budar
great book
SadLendy
Great quality.
Yozshunris
Here is a wonderful book - full of scholarship and well-written, often as gripping as a spy novel, and packed with information to help us appreciate the long and painful journey we have made to reach relatively free and tolerant societies in the advanced world.

The Elizabethan era has long been one of my favorites - a time of great change, a notable step towards the modern era, a time packed with high adventures and important achievements, a time of great writers and adventurers, and the time of one of Europe's greatest princes (Elizabeth herself used the term prince), and I have read a good many books. So it was pleasantly surprising that Alice Hogge offered a number of details and anecdotes of which I had little or no knowledge.

Elizabeth's special deputy, as it were, in hunting down Catholic priests in hiding and recusants (Catholics who refused to join the Church of England, despite fines and punishments) assisting them, Richard Topcliffe, was an extraordinarily hideous figure. I had read references to him before, but here are some facts and events of which I was unaware.

Elizabeth herself is known to have been a tolerant in people's dissenting religious beliefs, so long as they were kept private and a public show was made of keeping to the laws governing England's new church arrangements. Everything religious in that time was unfortunately also charged with political meaning, and if ever there were a lesson for keeping church and state separate, this tale is it.

The Parliament of that day was increasingly under the influence of the Puritans, and Elizabeth had to make compromises with them despite not agreeing with their nasty excesses, a story both of the dawning of a new religious era and the decline in the power of the monarch as part of the long journey towards democratic government.

Still, the details offered of Topcliffe's special relationship with Elizabeth are surprisingly unpleasant to learn.

But it was a terrible time - one we can barely fully appreciate - especially after Elizabeth's excommunication in 1570 by Pius V giving Catholics the "right" to get rid of her, Philip II's 1588 massive Armada and other efforts to overthrow her, assassinations and civil wars in Europe, various plots in England, and Elizabeth's own great insecurity over her throne, considering all that came before her with her tyrant father and her terrifying half-sister Mary, and then that rather demented but charming contemporary claimant to the throne, Mary, Queen of Scots, always involved in plots.

The story of Nicholas Owen, craftsmen and builder of many ingeniously-conceived "priest hides" in English Catholic great homes, is a wonderful one. I was pleased that the author gave a substantial discussion of his admirable and heroic efforts.

The terrible irony of those times was that so many good people on both sides - Catholic and non-Catholic - were swept away in a great tide of terrible events brought on by a smaller number of fanatics and paranoids. Ms. Hogge gives us a very vivid sense of this. She also gives us a good sense of the terrible extremism - just as bad as the worst Catholic plotters - of the emerging extreme Protestants, the various Puritan groups who were as ugly and murderous as the bloodiest Popes.

The story continues after Elizabeth - she died in 1603 - with the first of the Stuart kings, James I , a king who started with much promise and delivered little in religious and other matters, and on to the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, whose dark corners and ambiguities Ms Hogge outlines. Ms. Hogge takes us to the end for some of the key characters of the era, but of course the end of her book was not the end of religious strife. It is a tale of executions, torture, and exile.

I loved the way Ms. Hogge gave us an afterward relating the hunt for Catholics in England then to the situation of Muslims today in Western countries.

This is altogether an admirable and excellent book, and I recommend it highly.
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