» » Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess

eBook Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess epub

by Alison Weir

eBook Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess epub
  • ISBN: 0712641971
  • Author: Alison Weir
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (2008)
  • ePUB size: 1718 kb
  • FB2 size 1207 kb
  • Formats rtf doc txt lit


In her remarkable new book, Alison Weir recounts one of the greatest love stories of medieval England. Although Katherine’s story provides unique insights into the life of a medieval woman, she was far from typical in that age.

In her remarkable new book, Alison Weir recounts one of the greatest love stories of medieval England. It is the extraordinary tale of an exceptional woman, Katherine Swynford, who became first the mistress and later the wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Katherine Swynford’s charismatic lover was one of the most powerful princes of the 14th century, the effective ruler of England behind the throne of his father Edward III in his declining years, and during.

Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and his Scandalous Duchess is a biography of Katherine Swynford written by Alison Weir and published in 2007. In the US, the book is titled Mistress of the Monarchy: The Life of Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster. Katherine Swynford was the longtime mistress and later the third wife of John of Gaunt, third surviving son of Edward III. Through their legitimized children, she became an ancestress of several royal dynasties no.

Alison Weir is THE writer of this and the Tudor period. In this book on Katherine, Weir is blocked by the fact that nothing exists regarding this very important woman. For reasons unknown all written correspondence and only or two land and several annuities are visible on other records. Weir connects Katherine's probable actions to other events.

Mobile version (beta). Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess. Download (mobi, 508 Kb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Комментарии отключены.

Katherine Swynford book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Katherine Swynford book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In her remarkable new book, Alison Weir recounts one of the greatest and most remarkable love stories of. .

In her remarkable new book, Alison Weir recounts one of the greatest and most remarkable love stories of medieval England. It is the extraordinary tale of an exceptional woman, Katherine Swynford, who became first the mistress, and later the wife, of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Although Katherine's story provides unique insights into the life of a medieval woman she was far from typical in that chauvinistic age. She was an important person in her own right, a woman who had remarkable opportunities, made her own choices, flouted convention and took control of her own destiny - even of her own public image.

In this impressive book, Alison Weir has triumphantly rescued Katherine from the footnotes of history, highlighting her key . Katherine Swynford was first the mistress, and later the wife, of John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster.

In this impressive book, Alison Weir has triumphantly rescued Katherine from the footnotes of history, highlighting her key dynastic position within the English monarchy. She was the mother of the Beaufort, then the ancestress of the Yorkist kings, the Tudors, the Stuarts and every other sovereign since - a prodigious legacy that has shaped the history of Britain.

During John's absence, Katherine would have been preparing for her coming confinement. The love and friendship between John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford was to endure for more than a quarter of a century. Her baby probably arrived in the winter of 13 72-3 ; by this reckoning, John Beaufort's age, as given in Richard II's grant of 1392, must be inaccurate. For great lords, marriage was normally a political affair, and love a private on. The Church and the public at large might frown on extramarital liaisons, but they were an accepted part of aristocratic life, given that love rarely followed marriage.

Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess

Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess. In her remarkable new book, Alison Weir recounts one of the greatest love stories of medieval England. In this vibrant biography, acclaimed author Alison Weir reexamines the life of Isabella of England, one of history’s most notorious and charismatic queens. Isabella arrived in London in 1308, the spirited twelve-year-old daughter of King Philip IV of Fr. The Witch and the Priest. by Hilda Lewis · Alison Weir.

Katherine Swynford was first the mistress, and later the wife, of John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster

Katherine Swynford was first the mistress, and later the wife, of John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster. Her charismatic lover was one of the most powerful princes of the fourteenth century and Katherine was renowned for her beauty and regarded as enigmatic, intriguing and even dangerous by some of her contemporaries. In this impressive book, Alison Weir has triumphantly rescued Katherine from the footnotes of history, highlighting her key dynastic position within the English monarchy.

Katherine Swynford
Comments: (7)
catterpillar
Katherine Payn Roet,daughter of an impoverished knight serving the Plantagenet Court in fourteenth century England,married another almost equally impoverished knight,Sir Hugh Swynford,who served John of Gaunt,Duke of Lancaster, on his various military excursions into Europe,After Swynford's death,Katherine began an affair with John of Gaunt which lasted,intermittently,for the rest of their lives,bore his children,the Beauforts,and culminated in John of Gaunt marrying her a few years before his death,thereby making her the Duchess of Lancaster, the First Lady of England, and the ancestor of the Royal houses of the Nation,all the way down to the present day.
During all the years before her eventual marriage to john of Gaunt,although still under the loose protection of Lancaster,she led a reclusive life mostly in Lincolnshire,tending her manor,and involving herself quietly,in some of the business and developments going on in the City of Lincoln, where she now lies buried in the Cathedral.
It is this period of comparative mystery that Alison Weir has researched so carefully,there was never even a portrait of Katherine to show us what she looked like,and for the first time,interested readers can learn about the woman as she probably really was,rather than just as the much vilified adultress and begetter of royal bastards. Tthe story,which also covers her entire life, is historically accurate too.
For those millions of readers around the world,who read Anya Setons marvelous "semi biographical"novel"Katherine",this is an essential work with which to complete the known picture of this historically important,enigmatic,woman. Highly readable,and recommended.
Adoraris
Alison Weir is THE writer of this and the Tudor period. In this book on Katherine, Weir is blocked by the fact that nothing exists regarding this very important woman. For reasons unknown all written correspondence and only or two land and several annuities are visible on other records. Weir connects Katherine's probable actions to other events. It is a masterful book of detail. The fictional book she talks about written about Katherine in 1950's. Is fabulous. I have carried it with me from my teenage years( which disappeared a long time ago). No in depth story leaves the book a disappointment but the detail of the end result of her life is superb. The 1950's book is still in publication. Get both "Katherine" by Seton and the book for a perfectly rounded view.
Stoneshaper
When I want to read a book on a topic that interests me and I don't know much about the author, I really enjoy reading the reviews - both for and against. I especially value the reviews that summarize the contents briefly so I can get some idea of how the topic is treated. Sometimes the evaluations for are unbelievably favorable, and I could well believe they are written by friends and relatives. On the other hand, the negative reviews go far in the other direction, especially when the author has hit nerves on sensitive issues or debunked a point of view. The negative reviews of this book are good illustrations of that.

I read KATHERINE by Anya Seton in the late 1950s, and I loved it. I reread it many times. I've been fascinated by medieval England since I first read Howard Pyle's stories of King Arthur and Robin Hood when I was in grade school. As I grew older and started reading nonfiction and histories, I started putting myth and legend into perspective with historical research. I went through a period of almost sadness to learn my favorite stories had maybe just a smidgen of fact, but I quickly shifted into appreciating the imagination of the storytellers who could bring dry records to life to form a picture of what life was like in the distant past.

One of my college professors in a history of England class gave us a beginning assignment - write your version of the conquest of England using only sources dating no later than 100 years (I think - maybe 200 years) of 1066. These included the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the Bayeaux tapestry, three or four other chroniclers - when we looked at them, there was maybe five or six pages of information mostly from Norman French sources. None of us had brains enough in gear to attempt to evaluate who the writers of these "histories" were and who they were trying to impress or were paid by, or to think that just maybe none of them even attempted to give us the whole story. Yup, I was one of those who flunked the paper big time.

Historical research is not for sissies. I knew even back in the late 50s that KATHERINE was a romance. It wasn't until maybe 10-15 years later when I had studied the sociology as well as the history of the middle ages that I realized just how romanticized it was. We surely don't think about ourselves and our values today as did people living centuries ago. Ms Seton's book is still a good story (I still own it and reread it with pleasure), and it fed my interest in studying history. Thank you, Anya Seton. And thank you, Alison Weir. You have both made my life much richer.
Ckelond
This is a very interesting read. It is thoughtful, well researched, and evenhanded. Miss Weir has spent considerable effort researching the available records involving gifts of cloth, wine, and assorted other things to place where and when people were. She resists the temptation to absolutely place people without collaborative evidence. Lots of very interesting information. I enjoyed reading this book.
Narder
This is a fascinating book to read in spite of its small print. I have been interested in medieval history of England and France since I read Anya Seton's novel Katherine in high school. It has been interesting to see what Ms Weir has been able to find in her long and arduous research on John of Gaunt and all the characters (real people) in the lives of these two lovers. I was not aware of the importance of Katherine Swynford in the nobles and many kings to whom she was ancestress. This book, though in some cases, a difficult read, is worth the time and effort to learn more about some of the most influential and interesting people of history.

Ms. Weir is clear in her research and factual information and logical in her speculation at filling in the details in the lives of these people.
eBooks Related to Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and His Scandalous Duchess
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020