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eBook Family Names and Family History epub

by David Hey

eBook Family Names and Family History epub
  • ISBN: 1852855509
  • Author: David Hey
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (June 22, 2006)
  • Pages: 262 pages
  • ePUB size: 1169 kb
  • FB2 size 1827 kb
  • Formats azw rtf azw lrf


The place-name refers to a cottage on a heath or wasteland where was found an outlying farm or grange of Grendon Abbey. Family Names and Family History, David Hey, 2000, Digitized by Google.

The place-name refers to a cottage on a heath or wasteland where was found an outlying farm or grange of Grendon Abbey. The said Grendon Abbey was founded in 1133 Some variations of the name are "Heathcoat" and "Heathcote". 2 Notable Heathcotes. php?title Heathcote (surname)&oldid 925122922".

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. David Hey, now retired, was Professor of Local History at Sheffield University and is the author of The Oxford Guide to Family History (1993). The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinating in its own right. Formed from first names.

David Hey is Emeritus Professor of Local and Family History at the University of Sheffield. He is President of the British Association for Local History and the Chairman of the British Record Society. Библиографические данные. Surnames, DNA, and Family History. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names and proves that most families stayed close to their place of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origins by using national and local records.

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed. Book mentioned in The Guardian (Saturday supplement), April 2007 Title mentioned in Who Do You Think You Are?, 2008. The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinationg in its own right. David Hey shows how, when and where families firs got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Book mentioned in The Guardian (Saturday supplement), April 2007 Title mentioned in Who Do You Think You Are?, 2008

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origin by using national and local records. His books include How Our Ancestors Lived, The Oxford Guide to Family History, The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History and Family Names and Family History.

Magazine article History Today. Family Names and Family History. Publication: History Today. Magazine article History Today. David Hey looks al what our surnames can tell us about our origins. Volume/issue: Vol. 51, No. 7. Publication date: July 2001. Contributors: Hey, David.

Author: David Hey ISBN 10: 1852852550. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. DAVID HEY was Professor of local History at Sheffield University and is author of The Oxford Guide to Family History. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 17 pre-owned listings. Country of Publication. History & Military.

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinating in its own right. Formed from first names, place names, nicknames and occupations, names allow us to trace the movements of our ancestors from the middle ages to the present day. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origin by using national and local records. Family Names and Family History tells anyone interested in tracing their own name how to set about doing so.

Comments: (2)
Anayaron
The book was interesting but did not provide the particular info I was looking for among my various English ancestors.
Zut
One thing all family researchers necessarily have in common, regardless of ethnicity, is an interest in names. In this connection, you're fortunate if you have some English ancestry, for many less common surnames are still largely peculiar to one English county or another. The author's own surname places his origins in the West Riding of Yorkshire; he notes that he is quite used to seeing such names as "Staniforth" and "Broomhead," but that "southern" names such as "Gulliver" or "Loder" still catch his eye as being non-local -- which must seem very strange to most Americans. Hey, a professor of local history, leads the reader carefully through the historical immigration process -- Anglo-Saxon, Danish, Norman, Dutch, Flemish, Huguenot -- that affected the development of English surnames, outlines the methods available to determine the most likely place of origin of a family name not only in the 17th century (and earlier) but also in the modern mobile world. He traces many names as examples (they have their own index), and alerts the researcher to avoidable pitfalls; "Custer" is a common name in Berkshire, but the General's surname actually was anglicized from the Dutch name "Koster." Hey provides only the beginning of surname research, as his bibliography makes clear, but this engrossing volume is a good place to start.
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