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eBook Scottish Battles epub

by John Sadler

eBook Scottish Battles epub
  • ISBN: 1843410478
  • Author: John Sadler
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Birlinn (June 19, 2010)
  • Pages: 308 pages
  • ePUB size: 1810 kb
  • FB2 size 1168 kb
  • Formats rtf lit docx txt


Scottish history has been shaped and defined by a series of great battles. John Sadler gives the first full military history of Scotland for many years.

Scottish history has been shaped and defined by a series of great battles. From Mons Graupius to Culloden, he shows how terrain and politics shaped the campaigns and decisive engagements we still remember today. Each chapter also features sections on the development of warfare – its tactics, equipment and styles of fighting. For the military historian, Scotland is a fascinating example of how a small country can fight off domination by a far larger neighbour.

John Sadler gives the first full military history of Scotland for many years. Scottish Battles - John Sadler. Each chapter also features sections on the development of warfare - its tactics, equipment and styles of fighting.

Scottish Battles book. Born in 1953, John Sadler has law degrees from Northumbria University and the University of Westminster. A part-time lecturer in military history at Sunderland University Centre for Lifelong Learning, he is currently studying toward a PhD in history and is soon to begin an Imperial War Museum Fellowship in Holocaust Studies. He is the author of over 20 books, including Scottish Battles, published Born in 1953, John Sadler has law degrees from Northumbria University and the University of Westminster.

John Sadler's main specialism is in military history, as an accomplished author, lecturer, battlefield tour guide, heritage professional and historical interpreter

John Sadler's main specialism is in military history, as an accomplished author, lecturer, battlefield tour guide, heritage professional and historical interpreter. He is a visiting lecturer at the University of Sunderland Centre For Lifelong Learning since 1998.

The Scottish Book (Polish: Księga Szkocka) was a thick notebook used by mathematicians of the Lwów School of Mathematics in Poland for jotting down problems meant to be solved. The notebook was named after the "Scottish Café" where it was kept. Originally, the mathematicians who gathered at the cafe would write down the problems and equations directly on the cafe's marble table tops, but these would be erased at the end of each day, and so the record of the preceding discussions would be lost

Scotland's long coastline runs from the waters of Galloway and the Solway, through the Irish Sea to the long sea lochs and myriad islands of the Celtic west, around grim Cape Wrath, the coast of Caithness, Pentland Firth and the Orkneys, eastward down to the Moray Firth, the eastern seaboard, to the Forth and the sentinel of the Bass Rock. It is an ancient strand redolent with history.

Sadler is a regular contributor to military and historical journals and has published a number of books on the subject

Sadler is a regular contributor to military and historical journals and has published a number of books on the subject. He has taught and tutored history as well. 1988) Battle for Northumbria, UK: Bridge Studios. 1996) Scottish Battles. 2000) War in the North 1461-1464.

Scottish history has been shaped and defined by a series of great battles. John Sadler gives the first full military history of Scotland for many years. From Mons Graupius to Culloden, he shows how terrain and politics shaped the campaigns and decisive engagements we still remember today. Each chapter also features sections on the development of warfare - its tactics, equipment and styles of fighting.For the military historian, Scotland is a fascinating example of how a small country can fight off domination by a far larger neighbor. From Celtic warfare to the feudal host to the professional armies of the eighteenth century, from guerrilla warfare to the pitched battle, from siege to Border Reiver, Scotland is unique in having had almost every major type of warfare taking place within its frontiers. Battles such as Bannockburn, Flodden, and Culloden, have a resonance and impact far beyond Scotland. John Sadler weaves chronicle, narrative, and analysis together in a masterly way, recreating the drama and passion of centuries past.
Comments: (3)
ME
A great encapsulated history of the nation of Scotland. It traces the interactions between social and military developments by showing how improving military capabilities changed the way local populations built their defenses and revised their social structures and vice versa. It's a well written study in a nation's military and socio-political history.
Tygolar
This is an interesting topic, but unfortunately this work has a scissors and paste feel to it, as if it were thrown together from miscellaneous sources without any deep understanding of the subject. The structure is very anecdotal and episodic and the chronology jumps around willy-nilly without any good reason. The lack of balance in the work can be demonstated by the fact that the flashy but insignificant military campaigns of Montrose get 34 pages while the vital campaigns conducted by Bruce up to the Battle of Bannockburn are peremptorily dealt with in less than 3 pages. Bannockburn is adequately covered, but the campaigns leading up to this crowning victory were perhaps even more important.
Instead of having his own clear ideas of the relevant importance of different periods and events and seeking out his sources accordingly, Sadler's writing seems sadly determined by whatever sources are at hand.
Another point about the work is the writing style or lack of it. Unable to make the events interesting or dramatic by a sincere and clear style, the author time and again throws in anachronistic cliches and coinages in an attempt to sound clever and informed. To give a few examples: on page 126, he talks about a group of royalist camp followers being "casually butchered" as if this was some sort of spaghetti Western. On the same page we have the anachronistic and awkward phrase: "Baillie was obeyed to 'work out his notice'" as if his superiors were going to 'take away his key to the executive washroom'. This kind of trite phrasing just detracts from the historical tone, a cardinal error as one of the reasons many of us read history is to temporarily escape from the modern world. On the opposite page we have the unfortunate coinage, the "reformadoes", sounding more like a cheesy snack than reorganized companies of troops. The single worst item of his style however must be the incredibly stupid tautology repeatwd on almost every page where he refers to a "commanded body of shot" or a "commanded body of horse" as if it were the exception rather than the rule for groups of soldiers to be commanded.
Scottish battles is a fascinating topic. If you are not too fussy about the writing style, even this book can be quite readable in the same way as a magazine on the toilet, however, the more I read it the more the style irritates me. Hopefully, something a lot better written will come along soon.
Narder
Sadler gives a taste of bloody Scottish history that urges you to dig deeper. Each battle is covered in depth, with maps and eyewitness accounts whenever possible. Flavor is added with tactics, weaponry, and a historical review for the period of each battle. My only complaint is that a full map of Scotland and northern England is not included- this makes it difficult to follow accounts of the Border Wars and the maneuvering leading up to each contest.
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