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eBook In the Spirit of the Earth: Rethinking History and Time epub

by Calvin Luther Martin

eBook In the Spirit of the Earth: Rethinking History and Time epub
  • ISBN: 0801847095
  • Author: Calvin Luther Martin
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Historical Study & Educational Resources
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (August 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1348 kb
  • FB2 size 1162 kb
  • Formats docx rtf lrf txt


Calvin Luther Martin's "In the Spirit of the Earth" examines several closely related themes: the history of. .Martin describes his work as combining memoir, ethnography, and history.

Martin describes his work as combining memoir, ethnography, and history.

According to Martin, our current ideas about nature emerged during neolithictimes, as humans began to domesticate animals and farm the land. In thehunter-gatherer mind, animals and plants were spiritual beings and the earth areliable provider. But in neolithic innovations Martin finds the roots of ourown curiously alienated relationship with other living things and with theearth itself.

The book will eventually blow your mind if you read it enough. It makes you look at history from a completely different perspective. That is no small feat. Watch out for the trickster.

Similar books and articles. Vine Deloria & Calvin Luther Martin - 1995 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (3):681-696. In the Spirit of the Earth Rethinking History and Time. Calvin Martin - 1992. Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority. Martin Luther on the Bondage of the Will: A New Translation of De Servo Arbitrio (1525) Martin Luther's Reply to Erasmus of Rotterdam. Martin Luther - 1957 - J. Clarke. Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Politics: Weber on Conscience, Conviction and Conflict. Luther on Education Including a Historical Introduction, and a Translation of the Reformer's Two Most Important Educational Treatises.

Rethinking History and Time. Martin argues that history-his own discipline-and human centered ess lie at the heart of this ultimately destructive ideology. Calvin Luther Martin. According to Martin, our current ideas about nature emerged during neolithictimes, as humans began to domesticate animals and farm the land.

March 27, 2019 History. rethinking history and time. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat. In the spirit of the earth Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published 1992 by Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore. Philosophy, Hunting and gathering societies, Human ecology, Human evolution.

1992 In the Spirit of the Earth: Rethinking History and Time by Calvin Martin Luther. 1991 Culture and Truth: The Remaking of Social Analysis, by Renato Rosaldo.

Martin Luther King Jr. remains frozen in time for many Americans. Seared into our consciousness is the man who battled Southern segregation. They can also find resources in our lesson plan Making a Difference: Ideas for Giving, Service Learning and Social Action.

(/ˈluːθər/; German: ; 10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk, and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation

(/ˈluːθər/; German: ; 10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk, and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther was ordained to the priesthood in 1507. He came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church; in particular, he disputed the view on indulgences.

Martin, Calvin Luther. In the Spirit of the Earth: Rethinking History and Time (Baltimore, 1992). Marx, Leo. The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Idea in America (New York, 1964). McGregor, Robert Kuhn

Martin, Calvin Luther. McGregor, Robert Kuhn. A Wider View of the Universe: Henry David Thoreau’s Study of Nature (Urbana, Il. 1997).

This meditation by an award winning historian calls for a new way oflooking at the natural world and our place in it, while boldly challenging theassumptions that underlie the way we teach and think about both history andtime. Calvin Luther Martin's In the Spirit of the Earth is a provocativeaccount of how the hunter-gatherer image of nature was lost―with devastatingconsequences for the environment and the human spirit.

According to Martin, our current ideas about nature emerged during neolithictimes, as humans began to domesticate animals and farm the land. In thehunter-gatherer mind, animals and plants were spiritual beings and the earth areliable provider. But in neolithic innovations Martin finds the roots of ourown curiously alienated relationship with other living things and with theearth itself. This alienation is revealed not only in our artifice―thetechnology that moves us further and further away from nature―but even in theway we speak about the world. It is revealed most dramatically, perhaps, inthe horrific destruction we have visited on animals and landscapes. Martin sees the shift to agricultural economies as a change in spiritual imagination. This new approach to food getting meant a new understanding ofourselves and the world―a new, powerful image of the self relative to plantsand animals. It led to food surpluses, a population boom, the appearance ofcities and ceremonial centers, and the emergence of priestly classes and rulingelites―in short, to all the achievements, follies, and horrors of"civilization."

Martin argues that history―his own discipline―and human centered historicalconsciousness lie at the heart of this ultimately destructive ideology. Notions of order and progress, of a chosen people and linear time, fuel oursense that the world is ours to improve, exploit, and even destroy. We need torediscover the wisdom and sanity of less presumptuous ideas of nature―aprocess that demands a much larger narrative than historians have been writingand telling. Without calling for a return to hunting and gathering, Martinasks if some of what we lost―or left behind―in the distant past might bereclaimed and used again. To make peace with the earth. To make peace withourselves.

"Many will respond with that oft heard reply, But we cannot go back! To which I respond, But we never left―never left our true, real context, thatis. Homo is still here on this planet earth, abiding in our most fundamentaland necessary nature by its fundamental and necessary terms. We left all ofthat only, really, in our fevered imagination. It all began as an act ofimagination, an illusory image―most fundamentally, an image of fear―and so thecorrective process must likewise begin with an image. Let us re-learn, as hunter-gatherers knew to the core of their being, that this place and itsprocesses (even in our death) always takes care of us―that Homo's citizenship,and errand, rest not with any creed or state, but with 'that star's substancefrom which he had arisen.'"―from In the Spirit of the Earth

Comments: (6)
Mr.Death
Calvin Luther Martin's "In the Spirit of the Earth" examines several closely related themes: the history of modern man's relationship with the Earth and its creatures, our use of language, the mindset behind the development of technology, and history itself. Martin describes his work as combining memoir, ethnography, and history. I would add that this book is also a story. It tells of a species that once lived with a sense of connection to its natural surroundings, then severed that connection, and over thousands of years continued to build structures of thought, speech, and material culture which kept that connection broken. It tells how our range of human discourse "has narrowed from human/other-than-human to human/human."

It is also a meditation on the consequences of that story: the harm we have caused, in our quest for security and dominance, to our own psyches and spirits, to other species, and to other human beings who have not accepted our cultural paradigm.

The roots of this book go back at least to 1970, when Martin began studying the relationship between North American Indians and the land, its plants, and its animals--especially its animals. He discovered a repeating theme amongst tribal peoples: the spiritual and visceral connection ordinary people had with the animal powers. Drawing on his knowledge of both early Paleolithic cultures and what he learned of tribal peoples of the present era, he presents the reader with a plausible description of what human culture must have been like on the eve of the Neolithic Age, which ushered in agriculture, technology, urbanization, the concept of history, patriarchal gods, and the inability to live on the planet without despoiling it.

The theme of our bond with animals weaves through the book. In Paleolithic times we viewed wild animals as allies, even family. After the agricultural revolution, we domesticated, controlled, and abused animals. We demonized animals not under our control. And in contrast to the early mythologies which depicted animals as co-creators in stories of beginnings and transformations, Neolithic peoples wrote histories that were strictly about the doings of people, and the most powerful classes of people at that. Notions of history and time became tied up with the linear march of "progress," that is, the steps of accruing power over nature and over other humans whose ideas we oppose.

Martin's book is a powerful indictment of the prevailing mindset within which most literate people now live. The damage that has flowed from that mindset may be the undoing of us all. However, there are some things about our technological prowess that I find difficult to write off. For instance, my grandmother died in childbirth in a remote region without medical care. I would have died in childbirth too if I had not had access to modern health care. There is a price that comes with life in the wild. Would humans have all been better off to have none of the amenities we now enjoy?

One approach to this question suggests that the technological, rational, patriarchal stage has been a necessary but temporary phase in our species' development. Without it, we would never have developed as individuals with the capacity for self-examination. Nor would we possess distinct identities apart from our culture group, which is a relatively recent development in human history. According to some thinkers on this subject, the ability to act as an "I" has brought benefits as well as harm. But many also believe that we could be evolving toward a state of consciousness which will allow us each to perceive both as a discreet self and as a self connected to a greater whole that includes the entire network of Being--in other words, a state that combines our past and current ways of knowing.

Clearly, we can't go back to the past which Martin has written about so poignantly. But there is a way forward, and part of finding that way lies in examining what we've given up. Martin's book is an important contribution to helping us understand what we might want to carry forward into our future.
Mr_Mix
As a student of Calvin's at Rutgers University this review is not without bias, and yet to call it a stirring book, and to pronounce Calvin a profound thinker is not gratuitous enough. This is a book which engages the metaphysics of Native American occupation of North America as a means to critique the Western understanding of human spatial and temporal existence. It is both historical and philosophical as it seeks to reevaluate the relationship between human beings and the "place" they inhabit. Calvin is one of those individuals who has the power to change the way you see yourself in relationship to the world around you; "In The Spirit of the Earth", contains this power.
Lonesome Orange Kid
Don't pay attention to Trickster. If you've ever had a course on Native-American mythology you'd know what a trickster is. There is nothing in this book about quantum physics.
I was fortunate enough to have Calvin Luther Martin as a professor at Rutgers. I took one of his Native-American courses for fun and it was just that. Wildly fun. He was easily my favorite professor at Rutgers. He is a fantastic story-teller and if he's ever lecturing in your area by all means try to catch him. His lectures had a campfire-like atmosphere. That's how intimate and magical they felt. He would roam up and down the aisles of the lecture hall and speak in a soft yet energetic voice. This man is the definition of eloquence.
This book is a very interesting read. Even though it's been about 8 years since I was first assigned to read it I've read it several times since then. Each time I pick it up I see something that I missed in the previous read. This is one of those books that you can't benefit from unless you've read it at least twice. The book will eventually blow your mind if you read it enough. It makes you look at history from a completely different perspective. That is no small feat.
Akelevar
An inciteful book that questions how humans' beliefs and relationship with their environments would have changed as we moved from hunter-gatherer societies to more settled agricultural ones. It delves into how we define history and how the focus of history can be geared more toward the natural processes we are all apart of, or a linear series of individual personalities and events.
showtime
CHI-HO! Enter the mass of CLM and hear the gospel that you have ignored. Yes, you heard it here first--the Indians knew about quantum physics, but their knowledge of arcane physics was not enough to stop their destruction by the white man. Learn about superpositioning: this when Indians would teleport forward or backward in time (because time is cyclical). There is also a helpful section on painting oneself up like a tribal warrior of the past. My gripe with the book is that Mr. Martin has left out a crucial facet of Indian history--the smashing of the teleportation machines by the early Dutch settlers. This fact cannot be ignored in any survey of the period. CHI-HO!
Thiama
Just a note: the "review" by Trickster is just that, a con job.
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