» » 1809: Thunder on the Danube - Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs, Vol. 3: Wagram and Znaim

eBook 1809: Thunder on the Danube - Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs, Vol. 3: Wagram and Znaim epub

by John H. Gill

eBook 1809: Thunder on the Danube - Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs, Vol. 3: Wagram and Znaim epub
  • ISBN: 1848325479
  • Author: John H. Gill
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Frontline Books; 1st edition (June 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 480 pages
  • ePUB size: 1210 kb
  • FB2 size 1572 kb
  • Formats rtf docx txt doc


In this third volume John H. Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the 1809 war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria

In this third volume John H. Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the 1809 war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria. As they prepared for the next encounter.

Start by marking 1809 Thunder on the Danube With this third volume John Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria.

Start by marking 1809 Thunder on the Danube. Volume 3: Napoleon S Defeat of the Habsburgs: Wagram and Znaim as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by John H. Gill. With this third volume John Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria.

In the third volume of his trilogy on the 1809 war between France and Austria, John H. Gill describes step by step the gigantic confrontation at Wagram, which Auguste de Marmont described years later as the greatest battle of modern times in numbers. Gill describes step by step the gigantic confrontation at Wagram, which Auguste de Marmont described years later as the greatest battle of modern times in numbers of men united on the same ground in the view of an observe. ne may imagine the beauty and the. Majesty of that spectacle. Another observer, Marie-Henri Beyle – the future novelist Stendhal – wrote in his autobiography: During the cannonade some bushes nearby our artillery took fire.

In this third volume John H.

With this third volume John Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria.

This third volume in Gill's massive history of the war looking at the final stage of the war, from the aftermath of that defeat to. .

This third volume in Gill's massive history of the war looking at the final stage of the war, from the aftermath of that defeat to the close-fought French victory at Wagram, and the peace that followed. As they rest, important action was taking place elsewhere: Eugene won a crucial victory over Johann on the anniversary of Marengo, Prince Poniatowski's Poles outflanked another Austrian archduke along the Vistula, and Marmont drove an Austrian force out of Dalmatia to join Napoleon at Vienna. These campaigns set the stage for the titanic Battle of Wagram.

With this third volume John Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the war between Napoleonic France and . His latest work is 1809: Thunder on the Danube, just published in March 2008, which is to be the first of three volumes. An associate professor at the Near East-South Asia Center for Strategic Studies in Washington, DC, he has also published on military history and contemporary security issues relating to India, Pakistan, and other South Asian countries. A retired US Army colonel, he lives in Virginia, USA with his wife, and their two teenage sons.

-1809 Thunder on the Danube : Napoleon’s Defeat of.

item 1 Thunder on the Danube: Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs New Paperback Book -Thunder on the Danube: Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs New Paperback Book. 1. 0 -1809 Thunder on the Danube : Napoleon’s Defeat of the Habsburgs: Wagram and .John H Gill (Jack) is an Associate Professor on the faculty of the Near East - South Asia Center, part of Washington's National Defense University. A former US Army South Asia Foreign Area Officer, he retired as a colonel in 2005 after more than 27 years of service.

In this third volume John H. Gill brings to a close his magisterial study of the 1809 war between Napoleonic France and Habsburg Austria. This final volume begins with the principal armies of both antagonists recuperating on the Danube’s banks. As they prepared for the next encounter, important actions were taking place in distant theaters of war: Eugene brought his army into Hungary and won a crucial victory over Johann on the anniversary of Marengo, Prince Poniatowski’s Poles outflanked another Austrian archduke along the Vistula, and future marshal Marmont drove an Austrian force out of Dalmatia to join Napoleon at Vienna. These subsidiary campaigns all set the stage for the clash that would decide the war: the titanic Battle of Wagram. Second only in scale to the three-day slaughter at Leipzig in 1813, Wagram saw more than 320,000 men and 900 guns locked in two days of fury that ended with Austrian retreat. The defeat, however, was not entirely complete and Napoleon had to force yet another major engagement on the Austrians before Charles would accept a ceasefire. This under-appreciated battle at Znaim introduced an extended armistice that finally ended with a peace treaty signed in Vienna in October. Gill makes use of an impressive array of sources to present a lively account that covers the conflict from the diplomacy of emperors to the common soldiers suffering the privations of campaigning and the horrors of battle as they attempt to carry out their duties. Enriched with uncommon illustrations, more than 40 specially prepared maps, and extraordinary order of battle detail, this work concludes an unprecedented English language study of Napoleon’s last victorious war.
Comments: (7)
Anasius
well, you will know all you ever wanted to about the folly of megalomania and dreams of empire. salutary lesson in the lethality and fragility of warfare in the modern era of guns, rather than swords
Maridor
Concluding the history of the War of the Fifth Coalition, John Gill takes the time between The Battle of Aspern and the even greater battle (second only behind Leipzig) at Wagram to focus on the other theaters of the war: Poland, Hungary, Tyrol. In Tyrol, nationalists rise up against their Bavarian (French ally) overlords at the beginning of the war to coincide with the Austrian invasion of Italy. As the invasion of Italy went south, Tyrol remained one of the bright spots of the war despite being a largely militia effort. Mr. Gill recommends his other work "With Eagles to Glory" for a further and more in-depth study of the campaign, which ends with the Bavarians and French capturing Andreas Hoffer and ending the rebellion. In Poland, Archduke Ferdinand invades but is unhappy with the prospects of fighting "a secondary front." Achieving victory against the Poles at Raszyn (the wikipedia article is completely wrong), Ferdinand negotiates the safe occupation of Warsaw. This is a major mistake, allowing the Poles to escape, and create chaos in the countryside, eventually capturing the Austrian supply lines and forcing an embarrassing withdrawal from Poland. Furthermore, Eugene and the Franco-Italian armies push into Hungary and due to terrible battlefield leadership on part of the Austrians, who blunder away strategic advantages in the land, defeat the Austrians at Raab.

This is the final conclusion of his work, ending with the Battle of Wagram in which, for two days, over 300,000 men engage in one of the most horrendous battles of the Napoleonic Era. This battle was second-only to the Battle of Leipzig, and Napoleon assaulted across the Danube with lightning speed catching the Austrians by surprise. However, by night, the French assault is halted and Napoleon's famous marshal--Jean Baptiste Bernadotte, makes serious blunders on the battlefield that permit the Austrians to regroup. The Austrians counter attack on the second day, but are repulsed, but Napoleon is unable to score a decisive victory over Archduke Charles who retires the army in good order, forcing Napoleon to continue the war by pursuing him to Znaim, where an armistice is reached that saves the Habsburg Monarchy (even if Napoleon had little intention of breaking it up). Although a victory, it was, like for Austria at Essling, just a symbolic victory and Napoleon was denied another Austerlitz or Jena. For Austria however, the war marked another humiliating defeat at the hands of the French. Archduke Charles, despite falling from favor, should be given much credit for going one vs. one with Napoleon and holding his own, even inflicting a modest defeat upon the emperor. His actions to save the army, rather than risk all in a gambit, saved the Habsburg Monarchy from utter ruination. After the war, his reputation would heal over time, although he is still criticized by many German military historians.

The third volume contains a 50+ page bibliography, which is nothing short of magnificent for both laymen and professionals to continue their own research into this conflict. In the end, Mr. Gill has written, in about 1,000 pages of actual text (plus another 600 pages or so of indices, references, and bibliography) the most comprehensive and accessible version of what the great English historian Gunther Rothenberg called, "The Emperor's Last Victory." This is simply the best multi-volume work on the subject! The next several generations of Napoleonic scholars will no doubt be referencing Gill's trilogy whenever they look at the 1809 War on the Danube!
Abandoned Electrical
A detailed account that cuts through the"fog of war". It shows how intelligence and communication can be the deciding factors between evenly matched armies.
Malahelm
This being the final volume of John Gill's magisterial trilogy on Napoleon's 1809 campaigne I see this as the perfect time too review this brilliant work. This is the best and most complete work on any campaigne of the period from 1792-1815. Only Oman's Peninsular history matches it in detail. This trilogy is a model of what military history should be. Well written, balanced, detailed. The maps are both plentiful and exceedingly well done.
I want to thank the publisher for being willing to devote three volumes to this study. Without this space the writer would not have been able to give us this story in it's completeness. I also wish to thank the author for being expeditious in his writing of this book. It's been about two years I think between the first and last volume of this trilogy. I am reaching a point in life where I don't have decades to wait for a multi-volume history to be completed.
A little background on my history with this book. For decades the only work in english on the 1809 campaigne was Petre's "Napoleon and the Archduke Charles", the best of Petre's five volumes on the Napoleonic Wars. This was a good if dated account. The most modern account had been James Arnold's two volume work. While Arnold's work was more modern and had better maps each volume was only 200 pages and thus added little detail to Petre's work, and certainly didn't replace it as the best english language account of this campaigne. A few years ago while scanning greenhill books website I came upon a description of a two volume history of the 1809 campaigne by John Gill. When I saw the first volume was listed at 300+ pages I got excited at the prospect of a more detailed account of this campaigne, that is until I noted that the volume carried to the end of the battle of Aspern-Essling which kind of doused my enthusiasm since it wouldn't be anymore detailed than Petre and Arnold's books had been. But always on the lookout for a new book on a campaigne I anxiously awaited the books January publication. When that time came I could find no information on how to buy the book or whether it was even going to be published. Maybe a year or so later I saw it on Amazon's site but information was vague about the books lenghth or any useful about it. It was only when the book was about to be published that it was mentioned that this was going to be a three volume study
Each volume is 300 pages of text, with the final a little bit more. The first volume covers the political machinations leading up to the war and then covers the April campaigne in Bavaria. The beginning of this campaigne is one of the most difficult to follow because of Berthier's bungling and Napoleon's unclear orders to him. For the first time I got a clear understanding of what happened in these early days of the campaigne and the peril in which the French army put itself. I knew I was onto something special with this book when the operations of Kollowratt's two corps were gone into in detail. In most studies of this campaigne the operations of these two corps, operating out of Bohemia, are just glossed over but we get a good account of what they were doing and their potential impact on the campaigne as a whole. This is my favorite volume of the three because it consists of a lot of little battles that come together in a major campaign and crushing defeat for the Austrians.
Volume 1 flows smoothly into volume 2 without any need to recount what had happened previously. I hate when writers feel the need to waste space recounting what had happened in a previous volume. In a sense you could say that this trilogy falls into three parts, with the first part deeling with the principal campaign down the Danube up to Napoleon's defeat at Aspern-Essling. The first 200 pages deal with this part, and the first volume, while the next 250 pages deals with the secondary theatres. The last 100 pages of volume two deal with the Italian theatre while the first 150 pages of volume three cover the polish,dalmation and hungarian theatres. The final 150 pages of the book deals with the great battle of Wagram and the events leading to the end of the War.
If there is anything to be critical about in this book (and to me it's not a problem) it's that these books are not the last word on the battles of Aspern-Essling and Wagram. Eighty pages is devoted to each battle. The former gets two battle maps while the latter gets three battle maps. This is not to say that he slights these battles, both are well covered, but that this is not one of those books where 90% of the space is given to the big battles and everything else is summarized. This is a history of the campaigne as a whole and not just of the two big battles. Some people may find out more about the Italian campaign than they wish to know, or the Polish or the Dalmation. My feelings are that you'll always be able to find accounts of the two big battles, but to me it's the small operations that make this book for me. I've already mentioned the operations out of Bohemaia, but before this book I'd never even heard of the battle of Linz, covered in volume 2. I always wanted to know more about what was going on in Poland, and now I know.
This is not a thesis history where an author has an axe to grind or is pushing some theory. This is a plain vanilla history of a campaign in which the author tells the story from both sides and lets the domino's fall where they may. If the Austrian's come out worst it's because they deserve to, they ran a terrible campaigne. Napoleon is not treated here as a tyrant or is he idolized. He's treated as The Last Great Captain (in my opinion) in history.
I hope the author won't sue me for quoting from the last paragraph of his final book.
"All of this, of course, lay in the future. None of it was inevitable, and none of it was obvious as 1809 came to a close. The conclusion of the war opened new opportunities for Napoleon and for the other powers. The road to Moscow and Leipzig was only one of many paths to the future."
I hate it when historians see a particular event as leading inevitably to some other particular event years down the road. Nothing that occurred in 1809 set us inexorably on the road to Waterloo or any other result. Given Napoleon's megolomania he and his empire were probably doomed in the long run, but many things could have changed that or determined when it happened. As the author above said his victory offered many paths to the future and choices to be made, I congratulate the author for not falling into the trap of implying that a particular path was pre-ordained.
I hate it when the term definitive is applied to a book, as anything that can be done once can be done better and in more detail by someone else. I prefer to use a term someone used to describe Albert Castel's history of the Atlanta campaign, A Category Killer. That is how I would prefer to describe Mr. Gill's brilliant trilogy, A Category Killer. It will be a brave or foolhardy author who in the future decides to write a book on Napoleon's 1809 campaign. I personally could ask for nothing else on the subject as Mr. Gill has written it all.
Small Black
This book is packed full of research information for the serious student or fan of the Napoleonic era. It also is a good read. I like the E-book for the search functionality.
Skyway
As complete a history as possible. Excellent analysis of the war. The only improvement would have been. More detailed campaign mapps.,
BOND
Well worth the read!
The source now.
eBooks Related to 1809: Thunder on the Danube - Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs, Vol. 3: Wagram and Znaim
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020