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eBook Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons epub

by Walter Lord

eBook Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons epub
  • ISBN: 0671821768
  • Author: Walter Lord
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; First Printing edition (August 1, 1978)
  • Pages: 385 pages
  • ePUB size: 1745 kb
  • FB2 size 1758 kb
  • Formats azw lit doc rtf


Watchers of the Solomons. It is no ordinary piece of junk

Watchers of the Solomons. It is no ordinary piece of junk. This book tells their story.

Walter Lord's book shows why the Solomon Islands were crucial territory during the war, and the . Just finished Lonely Vigil by Walter Lord, an excellent (and long out-of-print) history of the World War II Coastwatchers in the Solomon Islands. Published 5 months ago.

Walter Lord's book shows why the Solomon Islands were crucial territory during the war, and the explanation of how the coastwatchers were formed and what these people went through is excellent. The coastwatchers' emblem was the peace-loving Ferdinand the Bull; they were supposed to observe and pass along information, they were not to fight.

In Lonely Vigil, Walter Lord, the New York Times–bestselling author of A Night to Remember and The Miracle of Dunkirk, tells of the survivors of the campaign and what they risked to win the war in the Pacific.

In Lonely Vigil, Walter Lord, the New York Times–bestselling author of A Night to Remember and The Miracle of Dunkirk, tells of the survivors of the campaign and what they risked to win the war in the Pacific Читать весь отзыв.

Lonely Vigil - Walter Lord.

Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons. In Lonely Vigil, Walter Lord, the New York Times–bestselling author of A Night to Remember and The Miracle of Dunkirk, tells of the survivors of the campaign and what they risked to win the war in the Pacific. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Lonely Vigil - Walter Lord. SIX THOUSAND MILES SOUTHWEST of San Francisco, just below the equator, lie the Solomon Islands, scene of perhaps the bitterest fighting ever waged by Americans at war.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Электронная книга "Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons", Walter Lord. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Lord, Walter, 1917-2002. irregular pagination throughout book. World War, 1939-1945, World War, 1939-1945. New York : Viking Press.

Walter Lord's book, "Lonely Vigil: Coast Watchers of the Solomons," written in 1977, was written as a tribute to those brave Australians who stayed behind in the Solomon Islands to report on the activities of the Japanese at great personal risk to themselves. They helped the United States during the Battle of Guadalcanal.

Lord, Walter (2012). Lonely Vigil: Coastwatchers of the Solomons (eBook e. Victoria, Australia: Penguin Books. Lonely Vigil; Coastwatchers of the Solomons. New York: Naval Institute Press. Coastwatching in World War II. Stackpole Military History Series. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Stackpole Books. Horton, D. C. (1970). Fire Over the Islands.

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Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Night Lives On.

Comments: (7)
Unnis
I have now read four books about the coastwatchers: Lonely Vigil (by Walter Lord), Alone on Guadalcanal (by Martin Clemens), The Coast Watchers (by Eric Feldt), and Coast Watching in WWII (A.B. Feur).

If you would like to learn about how the coastwatcher organization aided the fight against Japan in the South Pacific, the most comprehensive book is The Coast Watchers. This book was written by the man who set up and managed the coastwatcher organization (codename Ferdinand) from 1939 until early 1943 (when he stepped down after suffering a heart attack), and was the first book on the coastwatchers published after WWII (the first edition coming out in 1946).

Lonely Vigil covers much but not all of the same ground as The Coast Watchers, but goes into greater detail and is a more enjoyable read. This does not mean The Coast Watchers was a bad read, just not as enjoyable as Lonely Vigil. This should not be surprising, since the author of Lonely Vigil (Walter Lord) is a highly accomplished author.

Coast Watching in WWII (subtitle: Operations against the Japanese on the Solomon Islands, 1941-43) sounds as though it would offer a comprehensive review of coast watching operations during those year. In fact, this book covers only the coastwatching operations on Bougainville and neighboring Buka Island. This book is primarily the edited memories of two coastwatchers on Bougainville: Jack Read and Paul Mason). That should be interesting, but these accounts are stylistically dull by comparison with the Alone on Guadalcanal (discussed below) and Lonely Vigil, which is based on both written records and numerous interviews and recounts the same coastwatching tales on Bougainville in a more interesting fashion. In short, if a person has read Lonely Vigil (which was published about 20 years before this book), he could skip reading this book and miss little or nothing.

If you want to get a feeling for what life as a coastwatcher was really like, Alone on Guadalcanal is the book for you, as it is a first-person account put together by a single author. The author, Martin Clemens, was a government official before the invasion by Japan, and so the book offers not only the perspective of a coastwatcher but also that of a (thoughtful) British colonial official who was trying to manage things on that end as well. As a government official, Martin Clemens kept a diary all during his time in the Solomon Islands and so he was able to do a great job recounting his days as a coastwatcher.

Seeing that Alone on Guadalcanal was first published in 1998, one might well wonder just how much Martin Clemens could remember. In fact, as the author explains in the book's preface, the first draft of the book was written in the early 1950 but a final book never materialized because by that time there was already a great abundance of military books on the market and publishers did not have much interest in his story. It was only decades latter that a chance meeting between Martin Clemens and a US Marine veteran got the ball rolling again and eventually lead to the publication of the book by the Naval Institute Press. To make a long story short, even though the book wasn't published until 1998, the author actually did most of the writing in the early 1950s, when his memories were still relatively fresh.

I'm very glad I read three out of these four books about the coastwatchers. As explained above, I found Coast Watching in WWII was not a worthwhile read in terms of content or style (but I read it to the end so I could be fair). In terms of good reading, I enjoyed the first-person perspective of Alone on Guadalcanal the most. Lonely Vigil was also a compelling read.
avanger
This book would seem an unlikely choice for a woman of a certain age who's never seen one nanosecond of combat, but.... I read Walter Lord's A Night to Remember about the sinking of the Titanic, and I know how well he wrote non-fiction. I've also watched movies like South Pacific and In Harm's Way which touch lightly on the usefulness of the coastwatchers. Finally, my grandfather served in the US Navy in the South Pacific during World War II, and in reading military history about this time and place, I understand why he came home with nightmares.

Walter Lord's book shows why the Solomon Islands were crucial territory during the war, and the explanation of how the coastwatchers were formed and what these people went through is excellent. The coastwatchers' emblem was the peace-loving Ferdinand the Bull; they were supposed to observe and pass along information, they were not to fight. But this self-reliant group of independent thinkers knew that there are times when one has to think outside the box.

What these people went through runs the gamut of H's from hair-raising to humorous to heart-warming. Lord's non-fiction reads like fiction because he knew that what's important is people, not dates. Readers learn about a priest who was ordered to evacuate but managed to avoid leaving and of a nurse doing valuable work with the coastwatchers who couldn't escape her own evacuation orders. Readers learn about a young Navy lieutenant named John F. Kennedy and of the more than one hundred pilots the coastwatchers saved. And who could forget the submarine torpedo room turned into a nursery for evacuees and the ten-month-old baby who wouldn't stop crying unless he was being held by a burly bearded torpedoman named Phillips?

The coastwatchers worked among natives who could be friends one day and enemies the next. They had to remain hidden from Japanese soldiers who were constantly searching for them. They often had to move from one hiding place to another at very short notice, and they couldn't leave behind their radios (which weighed hundreds of pounds). Moving by stealth in thick, wet jungle and mountainous terrain-- often with injured pilots-- was brutal, exhausting work.

Lonely Vigil brings the work of these men to life. It's an important chapter in the history of World War II that will stay with me for a long, long time.
Windforge
The Solomons Campaign was a major turning point during World War 2 against the Japanese. After Midway Japan lost its strategic carrier advantage. But Japan retained massive resources in surface ships and troops. Japan came close to cutting off the supply lines to Australia and New Zealand.

The Solomons Campaign encompassed a series of actions over a considerable expanse of the South Pacific. The Allies had a huge advantage because a group of independent observers were scattered over a host of islands. The Coastwatchers gave real time information on Japanese air and naval units upon which the allies depended. Those observers and primitive radar gave the allies the narrow edge they needed to win a horrible battle of attrition.

The Coastwatchers were almost all long term residents of some of the most isolated spots on the planet. The Coastwatchers depended on island natives for food, supplies and labor. Although individual Coastwatchers got the credit, their native allies were just as important to the success of these observers.

Lord wrote this while some of the Coastwatchers were still alive. His book is a relatively short, but well-researched and amazingly interesting story of how this small group of individuals with their native allies helped turn the tide in the Pacific War. Some of the stories are hair raising. Some will lift your heart. All of the Coastwatchers were individualists and many had entertaining personality quirks.

I highly recommend this book if you are interested in this topic.
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