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eBook The View from the Turret: The 743d Tank Battalion During World War II epub

by William B. Folkestad

eBook The View from the Turret: The 743d Tank Battalion During World War II epub
  • ISBN: 1572490012
  • Author: William B. Folkestad
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: White Mane Pub; First Edition edition (July 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 146 pages
  • ePUB size: 1807 kb
  • FB2 size 1667 kb
  • Formats docx lrf mbr lit


I had spent hours talking with 743rd Vets over the years and I enjoyed reading some of the stories I hadn't herd

21 people found this helpful. I had spent hours talking with 743rd Vets over the years and I enjoyed reading some of the stories I hadn't herd. This is a book about the "everyday" soldiers who didn't get the headlines and were doing the tough job winning the war despite the shortcomings of the M4 Sherman Tank. They overcame and adapted to defeat an entrenched tough enemy.

The View the Turret recounts the frontline combat experiences of the 743rd Tank Battalion, beginning with the June 6, 1944. Invasion of Normandy and concluding with the taking of Magdeburg on the Elbe River in 1945. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

William B. Folkestad. Folkestad differentiates between the tank battalions of an armor division, which were designed to exploit breakthroughs and strike deep into the enemy's rear, and those like the 743rd, whose mission it was to fight alongside the infantry they supported. For the 743rd, this often meant fighting static battles with superior German armor. The inadequacies of the M4 Sherman tank-insufficient firepower, too high a silhouette, insufficient armor protection, gasoline engines, narrow tracks-are brought up time and again by the tankers of the 743rd.

by William B. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9781572491922.

ISBN 1572490012 [World War II: Second World War: Tank Battalions: Unit History: Tank Warfare: . full book description) Burd Street Press, Shippensburg, PA, 1996.

ISBN 1572490012 Price Reflects 20% off! Selling worldwide since 1987. We always pack with great care!. Clean, bright and tight. No ink names, tears, chips, foxing, etc. Foreword William Darien Duncan, Colonel, USA (Ret).

the 743d Tank Battalion during World War II. by William B. Published 1996 by Burd Street Press in Shippensburg, PA. Written in English. Campaigns, History, Regimental histories, United States, United States. Tank Battalion, 743rd, World War, 1939-1945. United States, Western Front. Includes bibliographical references (p. 130-140) and index.

This book recounts the frontline combat experiences of the 743rd Tank Battalion beginning with the Invasion of Normandy & concluding with the taking of Magdeburg on the Elbe . World War II (19391945).

This book recounts the frontline combat experiences of the 743rd Tank Battalion beginning with the Invasion of Normandy & concluding with the taking of Magdeburg on the Elbe River in 1945. Recently added by. LDMathews, CNY-Living-History, ControvichLibrary, SapperJoe2001, drakefamily, Tom2001, Tanks, tenutter, dgrapes.

Folkestad, William B. The View from the Turret: The 743rd Tank Battalion in World War II. Shippensburg, PA: Burd Street Press, 2000. The Irish War: The Hidden Conflict between the IRA and British Intelligence. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 1998. Glantz, David M. and House, Jonathan M. The Gates of Stalingrad.

The 743rd Tank Battalion was an independent tank battalion that participated in the European Theater of Operations with the United States Army in World War II. It was one of five tank battalions (all independent) which landed in Normandy on D-Day (. . It was one of five tank battalions (all independent) which landed in Normandy on D-Day (6 June 1944). The battalion participated in combat operations throughout northern Europe until V-E Day. It was inactivated on 27 November 1945. Folkestad

William B. Alert if: New Price below.

Interweaving the history of armored doctrine and training for tank battalions with the story of men in battle, The Vuiew from the turret is an unforgettable account of the impact of World War II on those who fought it.
Comments: (5)
Voodoozragore
The book adds pieces to the never ending puzzle of WW2. For being specifically focused on this one individual unit, the majority of it is based on official reports and has a some what big picture view that could have benefited from the use of more personal interviews and insight on why decisions and actions happened instead of just the recounting of them. Specifically I read the book hoping to understand the mystery of what happened on Omaha beach and the events leading up to it, and after reading, still have no idea what they were doing that day. Though the 743rd landed almost entirely intact, their actions of that day are nondescriptedly labeled as simply engaging the defenders. That they seem to have had no more impact on the actual D-Day breakthrough than the 741st, who's DD's were infamously nearly wiped out to the tank prior to even making it ashore, is not explored. Arguably, that one day was the units biggest contribution to the entire war, yet it remains a mystery.
Sudert
This book is a treasure. But, I'm biased, as my father was a Lt. who joined the 743rd in France as an excess officer about 10 days after the June 6 Normandy invasion. He served with the 743rd through ultimate victory in Germany. He is seen in the photo on P. 112 of this book, at the young age of 25, smiling, with some of his fellow 743rd Tank Battalion officers - brave and humble men who were his lifelong friends.
Mitars Riders
This little book is fairly representative of that genre known as the unit history. Such accounts derived from participants in combat, or even at the far-remove of unit After Action Reports, fill a niche in the huge library of "war books." This is one of those books. It is not a general history, its references are sometimes imprecise, and it sometimes bogs down in the chronology of the European campaign, but it does chronicle the gallantry of a group of men thrown into combat in a sub-standard tank-- the M4 Sherman.
In this day and age, when the United States is possessed of a tank (the M-1 Abrams) that maximizes crew survivability and stand-off killing power, it is easy to forget that from 1941-1946 we fielded a vehicle referred to by German anti-tank gun crews as "the Ronson," after the cigarette lighter of that name.
This little book has a wealth of technical detail on the Sherman, and it offers a look at the extent to which the Sherman's flaws were known and discussed publicly in 1944-1945. Also detailed are the field expedients attempted by the tank crews to enhance the vehicle's armor. The photographs which accompany the text are rather dark, but still viewable. The lack of maps is a regrettable deficiency not uncommon in such texts.
Overall, this is a decent little volume that enhances our respect for the citizen soldiers of World War Two. It also heightens our appreciation for the improvements made over the years by the villified "military/industrial complex" to the weapons the sons of this nation must sometimes use in combat.
JoJosho
I could only read about the first half of this book and had to quit. The many inaccuracies were just taking away from the decent information being written about. The second chapter is very poorly researched. The author keeps getting the German tank information wrong. One example is the Panther did not have a 88mm gun, it had a 75mm gun. He states this maybe four times. He also reports the many myths about the M4 Medium tank that have been researched and debunked over the last 75 years. One myth is that M4s caught fire from the gas engines. Research has shown it was the ammo storage that cause most of these fires.
I was really disappointed in this book. The use of 75 or more footnotes per chapter makes it hard to read. I had to keep flipping to the back to read more information on what I just read. The author relies on 60-70 year old books for his main research. Plus interviews done 50-60 years after the war, so they are unreliable without some historic research to verify what was said.
I would not recommend this book at all, just too many historic inaccuracies.
Reddefender
Not very many people who study military history may be aware, but the 743d TB was rated the most proficient Armored unit in World War Two. They took the fewest casualties, lost the fewest tanks, destroyed a very large number of enemy vehicles, were engaged in five campaigns and collected a great number of honors from D-Day through occupation duties ending in December, 1945. This book offers an excellent narrative of actions and engagements in which the 743d took part. Having fought along side the 29th ID, 1st ID, 30th ID and XIX Corps, the 743d was in the very thick of battle throughout the war. The author makes the unit history personal, with names of people and places involved, and often very graphic. I recommend the book to any one wanting to see the true elements of combat, coming to know the people who fought so valiantly with the 743d. My father-in-law, then Capt. Edward D. Miller, was one of them. This book recognizes the human efforts and elements that makes story-telling come alive. Buy the book--you will not be disappointed.
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