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eBook Big Week: Six Days that Changed the Course of World War II epub

by Bill Yenne

eBook Big Week: Six Days that Changed the Course of World War II epub
  • ISBN: 0425255751
  • Author: Bill Yenne
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berkley; 1st Edition edition (December 31, 2012)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • ePUB size: 1897 kb
  • FB2 size 1740 kb
  • Formats rtf mbr mobi lrf


s requiring precision attacks.

s requiring precision attacks. However, as the year came to a close, the Eighth Air Force heavy bombers had achieved little, despite having been in action since August.

Big Week was a watershed moment in World War II, and in the military history of the twentieth century. It was the point after which nothing would be as it had been before. Mitchell died three years before the start of World War II, the first war in which airpower would be decisive, but he had a profound effect on the American air officers who were the founding fathers of the concept that the USAAF could make airpower decisive. These men were led by General Hap Arnold, the commanding general of the USAAF throughout World War II, who gathered around him the men who won the war in the air.

Yenne's first book on UCAVs covered the period of early development through the end of the 20th Century. Drone Strike takes you from that time through today's latest technical wonders, covering such amazing unmanned aircraft capabilities as aerial refueling and landing aboard aircraft carriers even more accurately than manned aircraft.

The D-Day military invasion that helped to end World War II was one the most ambitious and consequential military campaigns in human history. Halting the Nazi Genocidal Machine

The D-Day military invasion that helped to end World War II was one the most ambitious and consequential military campaigns in human history. Halting the Nazi Genocidal Machine. German armies during World War II overran most of Europe and North Africa and much of the western Soviet Union. They set up murderous police states everywhere they went, then hunted down and imprisoned millions

Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General. A History of the Roman World: 753 to 146 BC. Churchill's Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made.

Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General. Dangerous Days in Elizabethan England: Thieves, Tricksters, Bards and Bawds. The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union. The Month that Changed the World: July 1914. A Global History of the Developing World. A History of Just about Everything: 180 Events, People and Inventions That. Before the Flood: The Biblical Flood as a Real Event and How It Changed the. 1808: The Flight of the Emperor

Jacket photo by Keystone (GettyImages). ISBN: 978-1-101-61896-7. The week of 20–26 February, 1944, may well be classed by future historians as marking a decisive battle of history, one as decisive and of greater importance than Gettysburg.

In just six days, the United States Strategic Air Forces changed the course of military . JULIUS CAESAR BOOK BILL YENNE 2012 like new -5.

In just six days, the United States Strategic Air Forces changed the course of military offense in World War II. During those six days, they launched the largest bombing campaign of the war, dropping roughly 10,000 tons of bombs in a rain of destruction that would take the skies back from the Nazi. Thus Big Week became one of the most important episodes of World War II, and coincidentally, one of the most overlooked-until now. The Pictorial History of Fighter Aircraft (NoDust) by Tom Debolski; Bill Yenne. Gothic Gargoyles by Bill Yenne (1998, HC/DJ). he Allies knew that if they were to invade Hitler’s Fortress Europe, the In just six days, the United States Strategic Air Forces changed the course of military offense in World War II. During those six days, they launched the largest bombing campaign of the war, dropping roughly ten thousand tons of bombs in a rain of destruction that would take the skies back from the Nazis. The Allies knew that if they were to invade Hitler's Fortress Europe, they would have to wrest air superiority from the mighty Luftwaffe.

That day refers to D-Day, the Allied landing in Normandy in June 1944. And why there was no serious German air presence over France that day, or any other day afterwards, is the topic of this book. Yenne has published extensively on military and other subjects. Even if his ultimate topic is a specific event or circumstance, he most often surrounds the subject with a Big Picture frame of reference. That massive aerial campaign, made possible by specific actions in the run-up to it, did change the outcome of the war and hasten its end. As importantly, it changed warfare doctrine in a lasting manner.

In just six days, the United States Strategic Air Forces changed the course of military offense in World War II. During those six days, they launched the largest bombing campaign of the war, dropping roughly 10,000 tons of bombs in a rain of destruction that would take the skies back from the Nazis… The Allies knew that if they were to invade Hitler’s Fortress Europe, they would have to wrest air superiority from the mighty Luftwaffe. The plan of the Unites States Strategic Air Forces was risky. During the week of February 20th, 1944—and joined by the RAF Bomber Command—the USAAF Eighth and Fifteenth Air Force bombers took on this vital and extremely risky mission. They ran the gauntlet of the most heavily defended air space in the world to deal a death blow to Germany’s aircraft industry, and made them pay with the planes already in the air. In the coming months, this Big Week would prove a deciding factor in the war. Both sides were dealt losses, and whereas the Allies could recover, damage to the Luftwaffe was irreparable. Thus Big Week became one of the most important episodes of World War II, and coincidentally, one of the most overlooked—until now. INCLUDES PHOTOS  
Comments: (7)
Dead Samurai
Like others I read BW and felt it was somewhat superficial, simplistic, tended to broad brush many areas, and had a number of factual errors. However, I felt that the major weakness was the omission of swaths of items that bore strongly upon the strategic bombing campaign in Europe. The writing, though a bit overwrought and aimed, it seemed, to high school students, was not too off putting ... it was readable.

Having said that, Yenne does hit most of the big points. And he provide a chronological and thematic structure that can serve as a first introduction to readers wanting to learn about bombers over Europe in WWII. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone even mildly familiar with the topic, nor would I read it again.
Winotterin
This is a good review of the bombing campaign over Germany during World War II.

Big Week occurred during the last week of February, 1944. It was the first time that the 8th Air Force put up over 500 planes for a number of days in a row for a week - in fact, six days and the the seventh didn't occur due to weather. The 8th Air Force was here to stay and during this campaign it wrenched air superiority from Germany in preparation for the D-Day landings.

The book covers more than Big Week though. It provides a lead up to this campaign, the success of this campaign and the lack of German airplanes over D-Day. The Allies had total control of the air over D-Day and from then until the end of the war. Big Week was the reason why this occurred.

What I liked about this book is how the author laid down his case and the results. He shared the facts - the destruction of German industry from the German perspective and impact on D-Day and following. I also liked the couple of human interest stories that he provided. However, I don't think that he provided enough which is why I didn't give it the highest rating.

Since there really are no maps of interest in this book, I recommend the Kindle for reading this book.

And, I recommend this book for any individual who is interested in the air war over Germany. This book provides a good strategic perspective of the war and the details around the tactics and the events. More interest stories would have made the book better but it is still a book worth the read.
Kamuro
Big Week was the decisive period in the european air war. The Luftwaffe had to be broken, and the loss of the B-17 bombers in the effort was no longer a concern. The advent of the P-51 Mustang fighter, helped to turn the tide. This aircraft was able to fly with the bombers to and from the targets. The Luftwaffe no longer had the advantage in the skies over Europe. The slaughter of the German fighter planes, spelled the end for the German air forces, and for German industry. No matter what the Germans did after this point, their cause was lost. JRV
Ballazan
Here it is, the turning point of America's young Army Air Force, the courage under fire of our young bomber boy's changing the out come of the control of the air over fortress Europe. Though I have read many accounts of the European air war of World War Two, this one has opened up a larger understanding of what really happened, how out numbered, out protected, American air power grew and cleared the sky of an overwhelming, well established German airforce, It's all here, the complete picture from errors, to luck, to courage in a new battlefield. GREAT BOOK!
MrDog
Fantastic narration of the Max Effort prior to D-Day of the Eighth Air Force bombing the snot out of Nazi Germany - setting their aircraft production on its heels to help assure the success of the Normandy invasion. This was truly the Greatest Generation - bravery, skill,and dedication to their country.
Kirimath
Not a complete history of the Eighth Air Force in WWII, but an intense, riveting, and emotionally draining trreatment of the maximum effort known as Big Week. The reader is regaled with great technical detail of the planning and execution of the air operations then is thrown into the air battles alongside those who fought the fight heroically, many bleeding and dying right before the mind's eye. I will no doubt return to read it again, after I recover, well after.
Perilanim
This is a book for historians and those with more than a general interest in history. In some ways it is an old-fashioned history, with long lists of names of units and subunits and descriptions of the structural relationships between units and supra-ordinate units, like groups to wings and wings to numbered air forces. Much of the writing lacks immediacy, slipping into reporting rather than describing. It therefore takes more than casual effort for the reader to remain engaged, when the narrative consists of which group of which air force bombarded which target. Some of the writing,though, is memorable, especially the passages describing the events that led to the awarding of three Medals of Honor, two of them posthumously.

To people already familiar with the general outlines of the story, the book provides not only a close-up view of one pivotal week in the air war, but also a vivid account of the context -- the events leading up to Big Week, the sequelae, and a postscript that traces the subsequent careers of the central actors. For general (casual) readers, the extra work required to get through this book is well worth the effort.
Should be required reading for any Service military education. Great book about the preparation and reasoning behind the effort to change the war before D Day.
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