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eBook Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South (Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures Ser.) epub

by Sarah Gardner,Paul Harvey

eBook Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South (Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures Ser.) epub
  • ISBN: 082034592X
  • Author: Sarah Gardner,Paul Harvey
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press; Reprint edition (March 1, 2013)
  • Pages: 200 pages
  • ePUB size: 1655 kb
  • FB2 size 1374 kb
  • Formats lrf txt rtf lit


Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures.

Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures. In 2008, Harvey was designated as the Lamar Lecturer in Southern History at Mercer University; the lectures he gave there have been published as Moses, Jesus and the Trickster in the Evangelical South (University of Georgia Press). In 2009, Harvey was named a Presidential Teaching Scholar at the University of Colorado, and from 2007-09, he served as the Senior Mentor to the Young Scholars in American Religion program at IUPUI in Indianapolis.

Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South. Paul Harvey uses four characters that ar. ore. Shelve Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South.

Harvey also draws on literature, mythology, and art to ponder the troubling meaning of "religious freedom" for slaves . Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2012.

Harvey also draws on literature, mythology, and art to ponder the troubling meaning of "religious freedom" for slaves and later. Full description Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2012. Series: Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures Ser. Subjects: Evangelicalism Southern States History. Christianity and culture Southern States History. Race relations Religious aspects Protestant churches History. Tricksters Southern States. Southern States Church history. Southern States Race relations History.

Paul Harvey uses four characters that are important symbols of religious expression in the American South to. .Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures. University of Georgia Press.

Paul Harvey uses four characters that are important symbols of religious expression in the American South to survey major themes of religion, race, and southern history. The figure of Moses helps us better understand how whites saw themselves as a ch. Specifications.

Series: Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures. Paul Harvey uses four characters that are important symbols of religious expression in the American South to survey major themes of religion, race, and southern history

Series: Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures. Published by: University of Georgia Press. Paul Harvey uses four characters that are important symbols of religious expression in the American South to survey major themes of religion, race, and southern history. The figure of Moses helps us better understand how whites saw themselves as a chosen people in situations of suffering and war and how Africans and African Americans reworked certain stories in the Bible to suit their own purposes.

In this comparative history of religious life in the South and the North, Samuel Hill considers the religions of America from a unique . (Book 23). Paperback: 168 pages.

In this comparative history of religious life in the South and the North, Samuel Hill considers the religions of America from a unique angle. Tracing the religious history of both areas. Publisher: University of Georgia Press (December 1, 2007).

Find the complete Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures book series by Paul Harvey. Great deals on one book or all books in the series. Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South.

Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lecture Series No. 52. Scholars of religion in the American South are once again indebted to Paul Harvey for pushing against the boundaries of their field. In his previous works, Harvey challenged readers to rethink how they define and intellectually map the region's historical religious experience.

Almost fifty volumes have been published in the Lamar Memorial Lectures series since the first, Southern Writers in the Modern World by Donald Davis, appeared in. Pub Date: March 1, 2013.

Almost fifty volumes have been published in the Lamar Memorial Lectures series since the first, Southern Writers in the Modern World by Donald Davis, appeared in 1958.

Find nearly any book by Paul Harvey. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Paul Harvey. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South (Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures Se. : ISBN 9780820345925 (978-0-8203-4592-5) Softcover, University of Georgia Press, 2013.

Paul Harvey uses four characters that are important symbols of religious expression in the American South to survey major themes of religion, race, and southern history.

The figure of Moses helps us better understand how whites saw themselves as a chosen people in situations of suffering and war and how Africans and African Americans reworked certain stories in the Bible to suit their own purposes. By applying the figure of Jesus to the central concerns of life, Harvey argues, southern evangelicals were instrumental in turning him into an American figure. The ghostly presence of the Trickster, hovering at the edges of the sacred world, sheds light on the Euro-American and African American folk religions that existed alongside Christianity. Finally, Harvey explores twentieth-century renderings of the biblical story of Absalom in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom and in works from Toni Morrison and Edward P. Jones.

Harvey uses not only biblical and religious sources but also draws on literature, mythology, and art. He ponders the troubling meaning of “religious freedom” for slaves and later for blacks in the segregated South. Through his cast of four central characters, Harvey reveals diverse facets of the southern religious experience, including conceptions of ambiguity, darkness, evil, and death.

Comments: (2)
Xal
I thoroughly enjoyed Dr. Harvey’s book. The only reason I gave it a four instead of a five is that I wanted more. In the introduction he did state that he didn’t include as many references and quotes since this work was based on lectures. However, one of the aspects of Harvey’s other works, particularly Freedom’s Coming, was the depth of research. With that said, I loved this book and he he expands on his analysis in a future book.

He successfully explained, using historical analysis, how Bible Belt “associated with high rates of violence, incarceration, divorce, alcoholism, obesity, and infant mortality.” I love the use of history to explore modern issues; the juxtapositions presented in this work are fascinating and intend to explore them further.

I would recommend this work to anyone interested in U.S, history or the sociological dynamics of the modern south!
Spilberg
Southern life, literature, religion, folkways, music, and culture evokes images. But there is no one image that captures it all. So, run down old buildings, farms, cotton fields, front porches, rockers on front porches, banjos, picnics, lazy rivers, huge arching trees, plantation houses, Confederate battle flags, jam sessions with white men playing guitars and banjos, jam sessions with black men playing guitars and banjos, country churches, signs telling folks that Jesus saves, and William Faulkner all characterize the South.

Southern literature is rich. It is rich in its roots. Consider Mark Twain and Joel Chandler Harris (who wrote the B'rer Rabbit stories). It is rich in the history of what Southerners called "the Wah." Consider Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind or Caroline Gordon's None Shall Look Back. It is rich in complexity. Consider everything that William Faulkner wrote. It is rich in comedy. The B'rer rabbit stories again come to mind. It is rich in tragedy. Consider every Southern story connected with the War. It is rich in the community and disharmony among the races. Consider Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird and Faulkner's Go Down Moses (and almost everything else he wrote).

I love it. I have lived it. Or at least I have read about it. My own Southern boyhood was more boring and more mythical than I care to admit. Tom Sawyer's most boring day was far more exciting than my life. Every time I read and teach Hie to the Hunters by Jesse Stuart, I want to be a young boy living with the Sparks in rural Kentucky. But, life can be lived, or at least supplemented, by books.

Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South by Paul Harvey caught my attention about a year ago when I was taking my son Nick back to Wheaton College. I came home and contacted the University of Georgia Press and asked for a review copy. And I got it and read it.

I read and enjoyed this book. Professor Paul Harvey of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and I have lots of common interests. Southern history, literature, and religion are consuming passions for both of us. But we see things differently.

Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South informed me even where it did not convince me. It provoked me even where it did not change me. It challenged me even when it did not instruct me. Meaning, I really like this book. If I were in Dr. Harvey's classes, I would really like him as a teacher. And yet, I would, at many points, not agree. Good reading and thinking is a contact sport. If your reading doesn't body slam you on occasion, you are not reading enough of the right things.

Quick summary points on the book:

1. The contents are from the Mercer University Lamar Lectures, Number 52. That lecture series has spawned a whole category of great literary and cultural studies of the South. I have a volume or two (by Donald Davidson and Cleanth Brooks) from past lectures and wish I had all the volumes. Since these are lectures, they are not as heavily footnoted and a complete survey of the topics is not in the purview.

2. White Southerners and Black Southerners viewed Moses and Jesus in different ways, according to their historic circumstances. Harvey is not writing theology, but this book is a good reminder that we often interpret our Faith in terms of our culture. I suspect it is impossible to not do so to some extent, but we need to read beyond, before, and above our own cultural imprintings.

3. This book examines, in part, William Faulkner's complex novel Absalom, Absalom, along with works from Toni Morrison. There is not much Southern literature that is clearly Christian like the British works by Chesterton, Waugh, Tolkien, and Lewis, but Southern literature is, to use Flannery O'Connor's term, Christ Haunted.

4. The book explores Southern music ranging from Johnny Cash to the blues to Gospel music.

5. It also explores the fact that the South is both heavily religious and the most violent part of the country.

Fascinating. Controversial. Engaging. Revealing about the South.

I received a free review copy of this book and am not bound to write a favorable review. Thankfully, my review in this case is favorable.
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