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eBook In a Blaze of Glory: Womanist Spirituality as Social Witness epub

by Emilie M. Townes

eBook In a Blaze of Glory: Womanist Spirituality as Social Witness epub
  • ISBN: 0687187575
  • Author: Emilie M. Townes
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press (February 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 164 pages
  • ePUB size: 1889 kb
  • FB2 size 1543 kb
  • Formats azw doc doc docx


In a Blaze of Glory: Woma. has been added to your Cart. In her Introduction to this 1995 book, she explains, Womanist reflection is individual, communal, and pithy in its critique and acceptance of love and analysis.

In a Blaze of Glory: Woma. Womanist wisdom springs out of the experience of African American women as they have been daughters, wives, partners, aunts, grandmothers, mothers, other mothers, comrades, worshipers, protesters, wisdom bearers, murderers, and saints in the African American culture and society--and in the life of the church. This perspectiv. s one that yearns for glory.

In a Blaze of Glory book. In a Blaze of Glory: Womanist Spirituality as Social Witness. by. Emilie M. Townes. This volume is an interdisciplinary exploration of the interplay between the contemporary Black Church in the United States and African American womanist spirituality and social witness. Historically, the Black Church itself has represented a strong yoking of social witness and spirituality.

This volume is an interdisciplinary exploration of the interplay between the contemporary Black Church in the United States and African American womanist spirituality and social witness. This blend has endured whether the primary theology and ethical import of the Church has been accomodationist or protest-oriented

Womanist spirituality, the author asserts, grows out of individual and communal reflection on African American faith and life

Womanist spirituality, the author asserts, grows out of individual and communal reflection on African American faith and life. In this book, she explains that womanist spirituality is not grounded in the notion that spirituality is a force, a practice separate from who we are moment by moment. It is the deep kneading of humanity and divinity in one breath, one hope, one vision.

African American women - Religious life. Spirituality - United States - History. Church and social problems - United States - History. United States - Church history. Place of Publication: United States Tennessee Nashville. 2 Finding the Legacy: Nineteenth-Century African American Women's Spirituality and Social Reform (starting p. 30) Ch. 3 To Be Called Beloved: Historical and Contemporary Lynching in African America (starting p. 47) Ch. 4 Writing the Right: Gender and Sexuality in African American Community (starting p. 68) Ch. 5 Another Kind of Poetry: Identity and Colorism in Black Life (starting p. 89) Ch.

womanist spirituality as social witness. by Emilie Maureen Townes. Published 1995 by Abingdon Press in Nashville. Church and social problems, Womanist theology, Spirituality, Religious life, African American women, Church history, Internet Archive Wishlist, History. There's no description for this book yet.

Emilie Maureen Townes (born August 1, 1955, Durham, North Carolina) is an African-American Christian social ethicist and theologian, currently Dean and E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of Womanist Ethics and Society at the Vanderbilt Univer. Carpenter Professor of Womanist Ethics and Society at the Vanderbilt University Divinity School. She was the first Black woman to be elected president of the American Academy of Religion in 2008 and served as was president of the Society for the Study of Black Religion from 2013-2016.

Townes, Emilie M. 1995. Townes, Emilie M. 2006. Womanist ethics and the cultural production of evil. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. epartment of Religious Studies and the Women and Gender Studies ProgramUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA. Cite this chapter as: Mitchem . 2017) Black American Women and the Gift of Embodied Spirituality. In: Joy M. (eds) Women, Religion, and the Gift. Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures, vol 17. Springer, Cham.

In a Blaze of Glory: Womanist Spirituality as Social Witness. Emilie Maureen Townes

In a Blaze of Glory: Womanist Spirituality as Social Witness. Emilie Maureen Townes. Once again, Emilie Townes brings together essays by leading womanist theologians, interweaving a concern for matters of race, gender, and class as these bear on the well-being of the African-America. More). Womanist approaches to the study of religion and society have contributed much to our understanding of Black religious life, activism, and women's liberation

In a blaze of glory: Womanist spirituality as social witness. Jambalaya, the natural Woman’s book of personal charms and practical rituals. Under the canopy: Ritual process and spiritual resilience in South Africa. Womanist approaches to the study of religion and society have contributed much to our understanding of Black religious life, activism, and women's liberation. Deeper Shades of Purple explores the achievements of this movement over the past two decades and evaluates some of the leading voices and different perspectives within this burgeoning field.

This volume is an interdisciplinary exploration of the interplay between the contemporary Black Church in the United States and African American womanist spirituality and social witness. Historically, the Black Church itself has represented a strong yoking of social witness and spirituality. This blend has endured whether the primary theology and ethical import of the Church has been accomodationist or protest-oriented. African American women in the Church have carried this legacyin their lived witness of spirituality and social action. This volume will explore someof the historic roots of this journey, the literary testimony of this heritage, and offers a constructive ethic for a contemporary social witness which is steeped in spiritual formation and growth.
Comments: (2)
Ynap
My book club and I will love reading this book. Thanks for sending it in a timely manner.
Dont_Wory
The Rev. Dr. Emilie Townes (b. 1955) is dean of Vanderbilt Divinity School, as well as Professor of Womanist Ethics and Society. She has also written/edited books such as Womanist Justice, Womanist Hope,A Troubling in My Soul,Womanist Ethics and the Cultural Production of Evil,Embracing the Spirit: Womanist Perspectives on Hope, Salvation, and Transformation,Breaking the Fine Rain of Death: African American Health Issues and a Womanist Ethic of Care, etc.

In her Introduction to this 1995 book, she explains, “Womanist reflection is individual, communal, and pithy in its critique and acceptance of love and analysis. Womanist wisdom springs out of the experience of African American women as they have been daughters, wives, partners, aunts, grandmothers, mothers, other mothers, comrades, worshipers, protesters, wisdom bearers, murderers, and saints in the African American culture and society---and in the life of the church. This perspective… is one that yearns for glory. Such glory is found in seeking a new heaven and a new earth---a world crafted on justice AND love that holds us all in God’s creation rather than in a hierarchy of oppressions Womanist spirituality grows out of these roots. This spirituality IS a social witness… Womanist spirituality is not grounded in the notion that spirituality is a force, a practice separate from who we are moment by moment… it is a style of witness that seeks to cross the yawning chasm of hatreds and prejudices and oppressions into a deeper and richer love of God as we experience Jesus in our lives… Womanist spirituality is the working out of what it means for each of us to seek compassion, justice, worship, and devotion in our witness. This understanding of spirituality seeks to grow into wholeness of spirit and body… into holiness in God. Such cogent holiness cannot hold its peace in a world so desperately separate from the new earth.” (Pg. 10-11)

She notes, “Black women took pride in the mothers of the Bible who became their role models for motherhood… [who] gave Black women a view of women as more than bodily receptacles through which great men were born. They saw these mothers as being responsible for rearing sons who would deliver Israel from its oppressors… Black women took the roles of wife, sister, daughter, and mother, combined them with a personal spiritual experience of God in Christ, and understood themselves to be ministers in their homes. With that step, Black women were able to move on from their image of domestic comforter to a greater call.” (Pg. 33)

She observes, “Because of the nature of its project, a womanist spirituality rejects dualism and argues for wholeness. The subject-other relationship is held in the web of creation or in my terminology, ‘is-ness.’ This runs counter to the self-other opposition that underlies much of Western thought. This opposition, or split, is a core part of Western values that cannot be ignored. However, while recognizing this split, a womanist spirituality advocates a self-other RELATIONSHIP, for it is in the relational matrix that wholeness can be found for African Americans.” (Pg. 48-49)

Later, she adds, “A womanist spirituality of wholeness is, finally, radically relational. The various narratives of African American life are constituent of the grand narrative of Black faith and hope in this land. This relational character calls us to moral responsibility and accountability for our lives and the lives of all those who have survived the diaspora. We are, in the most basic sense, one another’s keepers. Out of this, we recognize the preciousness of life and the deep interconnection between body and spirit that will help us be made whole.” (Pg. 66)

She states, “Womanist spirituality dawns from the apocalyptic visions of hope and salvation in the midst of our inhumanity. It is the lived experience of faith that is grounded in the context of struggling for faith and justice. This means that a key part of such a spirituality is to recognize the dualistic nature that so much of our lives have been tied to and question the healthiness of such a way of viewing and living life. This either/or existence can and does maim and kill the spirit, for it denies the interrelatedness of body and spirit… Living out womanist spirituality means integrating faith and life… We are called to a new a renewed awareness of our humanness and our infinite possibilities.” (Pg. 139-140)

She concludes, “It’s a tall order that womanist spirituality sets forth for us. In reality, it adds its voice to any spirituality that is based on hope and refuses to accept the narrowness and death-dealing of today and only grim prospects for tomorrow. For all this, though, we cannot do it alone. For the one thing that is sure in womanist spirituality is that we must know the Spirit. Knowing the Spirit is to use both heart and head… It is to love God with our minds through a rigorous and relentless pursuit of grasping, however imperfectly, God’s unfolding revelation in our lives through our ever-expanding understanding of the nature of the universe. It is in our struggles to live into our witness that we find God waiting for us and also prodding us into wholeness as individuals, as a people as a church. It is in this glory that womanist spirituality finds its witness.” (Pg. 143-144)

This book is another important contribution of Dr. Townes to Womanism, Theology, and Spirituality in general.
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