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eBook Jews in Old China: Studies by Chinese Scholars (English and Chinese Edition) epub

by Sidney Shapiro

eBook Jews in Old China: Studies by Chinese Scholars (English and Chinese Edition) epub
  • ISBN: 0882549960
  • Author: Sidney Shapiro
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English Chinese
  • Publisher: Hippocrene Books (November 1, 1984)
  • Pages: 204 pages
  • ePUB size: 1570 kb
  • FB2 size 1380 kb
  • Formats lrf azw lit lrf


Fascinating history of Jews in old China. Religious toleration is what drew them to China.

In particular these writers have focused on one center of Sino Jewish activity, Kaifing. Fascinating history of Jews in old China.

He lived in Beijing for over a half century and was a member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Council. He was of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. He was a graduate of St. John’s University, New York.

Jews in Old China book. He is most well known for his highly regarded English version of Outlaws of the Marsh, one of the most important classics of Chinese literature. In particular these writers have focused on one center of Sino Jewish activity, Kaifing.

It was then translated in Hebrew and published in Israel in 1987

It was then translated in Hebrew and published in Israel in 1987.

Jews in Old China was originally published by Hippocrene Books in 1984 with considerable success. It was then translated into Hebrew and published in Israel in 1987. This book provides a wealth of information about the conflicts, contributions, adaptation and ultimate assimilation of the Jews in China.

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Describes the Jewish arrival in China and the routes they followed, and discusses anti-Semitism, Jewish culture, and the role of Jews in Chinese history.

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Rubrics: Jews China History. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

1911 London Perelman on Chinese Tradition Culture Hebrew Rare Jews in China WOW.

CHINESE JEWS OF KAI FENG FU China. We Came to North America lot of 6 Chinese Hispanics Jews Italians Poles Japanese.

Describes the Jewish arrival in China and the routes they followed, and discusses anti-Semitism, Jewish culture, and the role of Jews in Chinese history
Comments: (7)
Kamick
With only shards of evidence and confusion and ambiguity on the meaning of ancient Chinese terms, which are most likely mutated transliterations from Persian and Arabic, Chinese ethnographic and historical scholars debate on when Jews first arrived, traded, and dwelled in China. After all, even in the West in fairly recent times, Jews were called, in English, Hebrews and Israelites. The editor and translator of this book is a long-time Chinese citizen, a Jew himself. That Jews had resided for centuries in Kaifeng, which was a capital of China in the Middle Ages, is well known. Although the scholarly repetition of evidence and various interpetations get tiresome quickly, there are still interesting commentary and the reader soon acquires an understanding of the Silk Road and the lure of China. A chapter provides an extensive contemporary description of Kaifeng in 1147, which was aided by a huge scroll painting, and establishes the capital as a cosmopolitan and cultural center; apparenty a few years later, in 1163, the first synagogue was built there. Jews among merchants and traders in the 8th century is well founded with, for instance, documents in Hebrew and Hebrew script from Dunhuang and Kotan. This book is an important contribution to Silk Road studies and Jewish history. It helps fill in some of the blanks between Roman Judea and the Renaissance, when Marco Polo observed Jews in his Chinese travels.
Boraston
In many ways, this is a dry subject, but with gold nuggets waiting to be found. Particularly, the revelations about the city of BianJing, later called Kaifeng. Chinese record its great prosperity and very detailed descriptions of everything that went on in the city, throughout its history. It rose, it prospered and it decayed and was left for "dead." The follies of mercantile evolution and its escalation of greed and eventual collapse. It is also dry accounts of Jewish traders, among many foreign traders. Jews did establish a long standing presence in Kaifeng, but they too, eventually got caught up on the luxury of business and trade going on there, and married Chinese women and lost their identity, sort of. This book aids Menzies' 1434 book and his 1421 book on China and its exploits, a most remarkable empire. and not less so, the Jews, a remarkable people and legacy. You might read Kritzler's "Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean as well. While the evidence of Jewish presence might seem dull, there is history to be gleaned, but the history of Kaifeng and its cycle of growth and decay, alone, is worth the price of this book. Its like striking a gold mine. China really was a super power in her day and now rises again in our day. We should have expected nothing less. I tip my hat to her.
Undeyn
When I first read the title I thought this would be such an amazing book to read. It is indeed very interesting just not easy to read. The text seems to be a collection of articles written buy scholars throughout China and the US and is hard to follow for anyone not familiar with this topic. I won't discourage anyone from buying this text just beware to sit down with pen and paper to make notes.
Gavirim
Fascinating history of Jews in old China. Religious toleration is what drew them to China. Very well researched. Includes the details on synagogue plaques and the historical account of an early group of immigrants lead by Lee Vie. The Chinese confused perception of monotheists lumped monotheist Muslims and Jews together. The only differentiation was "Blue Hat Huis" were Jews and "White Hat Huis" were Muslims.
Gavirus
If you are a scholar in any of several corners of Chinese studies, the Jewish diaspora or like me interested in the occasional obscuria, this will be a great read.

Sidney Shapiro undertakes a meta analysis of 16 Chinese scholars who have written on the early history of Jews in China. In particular these writers have focused on one center of Sino Jewish activity, Kaifing. In general the scholars are quoted, discussed and analyzed in chronological order starting in the late 19th century.

Among the questions under discussion are:the most likely time and routes for the arrival of this community; if and how its membership memorialized itself and if they are noticed in any of the imperial or other official records. There is something to be learned in how these scholars make their various cases.

Jewish skills as international merchants are repeated more than proved. There is some new (to me ) information about Jews as skilled sugar growers and cloth makers, however the comments on Jews as bankers and administrators could have been better documented.

This older Jewish community has died out; having become one with the Muslim community or completely absorbed into the Chinese population. There are two points about this fact. First that there is no evidence that this community was ever stigmatized, punished or otherwise subject to the kinds of murderous abuse that was standard in the Christian west, or the Muslim dominated east. Alternatively the main way for the lower classes in China to advance was through the study of Confucian and other classic texts for the several layers of the Chinese Civil Service exams. The speculation here is that the disappearance of this community was a result of the ease of assimilation and the total focus needed to study for and pass these exams. These theories are a matter of speculation as there is no hard case made for either of these theories.

My own conclusion is that small groups of Jewish merchants, traders and refugees, arrived in China via both the Silk road and some of the sailing routes. It took some time for enough to arrive to form a community and this community was centered for a time in Kaifeng, a trading and governmental capital. I am not clear as to the best dates for the formation of this center. I suspect that this in-flow of Jews slowed with the collapse of the Silk Road, mostly due to the effects of the Plague and the end of the Mongol Empire. This community became isolated. Over time it lost the scholarship, texts and fresh population to counter the effects of being a tiny population in a larger, culturally sophisticated and racial different population. Assimilation was peaceful, voluntary and gradual.

This is fairly easy to read for an academic analysis. Professor Shapiro has provided a well crafted collection and backed it with insightful analysis. I would have preferred a greater variety in the topics presented, but I appreciate the that he has done well with the material given.
Ericaz
The author is in an almost unique position with respect to translating and reviewing the works of Chinese scholars on this subject. I particularly liked the way he allows the reader to compare each of the featured scholars and avoided, with respect to historical content, throwing in his own two cents...or ren min bao.
Ckelond
very interesting
I like it very much because of the references and resources included. Worth reading.
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