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eBook Hare Krishna Transformed (New and Alternative Religions) epub

by E. Burke Rochford

eBook Hare Krishna Transformed (New and Alternative Religions) epub
  • ISBN: 0814775780
  • Author: E. Burke Rochford
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press (May 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 285 pages
  • ePUB size: 1418 kb
  • FB2 size 1973 kb
  • Formats mobi txt docx doc


Hare Krishna Transformed.

Hare Krishna Transformed. E. Burke Rochford Jr. a. NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS New York and London. Being a student of new religions, I real-ized that those born into Hare Krishna and the other new religions of the 1960s were important, given their collective inability to capture the imagination of a new generation of converts. I wondered and even wor-ried about how the changing fortunes of the Krishna movement had shaped the lives of the children and parents I had come to know during the 1970s.

Burke Rochford is the most notable scholarly interpreter of Krishna Consciousness in America, and Hare Krishna Transformed is the most insightful and informative book written on the organizational evolution of the movement. David G. Bromley,Virginia Commonwealth University. Burke Rochford J. s Hare Krishna Transformed is a compelling example of the deep insights. the strength of this study is Rochford’s meticulous data gathering. Sociology of Religion.

E. a NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS New York and London. new york university press New York and London ww. yupress.

Most widely known for its adherents chanting Hare Krishna and distributing religious literature on the streets of American cities, the Hare Krishna movement was founded in New York City in 1965 by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada. Formally known as the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, or ISKCON, it is based on the Hindu Vedic scriptures and is a Western outgrowth of a popular yoga tradition which began in the 16th century. In its first generation ISKCON actively deterred marriage and the nuclear family, denigrated women, and viewed the raising of children as a distraction.

Hare Krishna Transformed book Hare Krishna Transformed (The New and Alternative Religions Series). 0814775799 (ISBN13: 9780814775790).

Hare Krishna Transformed book. Hare Krishna Transformed (The New and Alternative Religions Series). New and Alternative Religions. Hare Krishna Transformed is a compelling example of the deep insights. the strength of this study is Rochfords meticulous data gathering. by E. Burke Rochford. Published by: NYU Press. Burke Rochford's latest book heartedly as a well done and sociologically informed case study. It is also quite well written, and flows well. James T. Richardson, International Journal for the Study of New Religions.

Burke-Rochford speculates with regard to the future direction of ISKCON as a religious institution, and documents the experiences of second generation Hare Krishnas throughout their early school years.

Most widely known for its adherents chanting Hare Krishna and distributing religious literature on the streets of American . Hare Krishna Transformed New and Alternative Religions (Том 1). Автор.

Электронная книга "Hare Krishna Transformed", E. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Hare Krishna Transformed" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Most widely known for its adherents chanting “Hare Krishna” and distributing religious literature on the streets of American cities, the Hare Krishna movement was founded in New York City in 1965 by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada. Formally known as the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, or ISKCON, it is based on the Hindu Vedic scriptures and is a Western outgrowth of a popular yoga tradition which began in the 16th century.

In its first generation ISKCON actively deterred marriage and the nuclear family, denigrated women, and viewed the raising of children as a distraction from devotees' spiritual responsibilities. Yet since the death of its founder in 1977, there has been a growing women’s rights movement and also a highly publicized child abuse scandal. Most strikingly, this movement has transformed into one that now embraces the nuclear family and is more accepting of both women and children, steps taken out of necessity to sustain itself as a religious movement into the next generation. At the same time, it is now struggling to contend with the consequences of its recent outreach into the India-born American Hindu community.

Based on three decades of in-depth research and participant observation, Hare Krishna Transformed explores dramatic changes in this new religious movement over the course of two generations from its founding.

Comments: (3)
Iraraeal
ISKCON's history in West has been an ongoing conflict over the nature of its culture, most significantly the growth of the family life and its challenge to the movement's traditional way of closed communal life. The abuse of children and women in 1970s coupled with dwindling revenue from its literature distribution program made the organization more vulnerable, and gradually became a congregationally based movement with nuclear families in 1980s. Women challenged the traditional male domination in the temple, children went to court to seek justice, the law enforcement went after criminal elements, and the Indian Hindu immigrants became new members of the growing congregation. The ISKCON movement has reshaped and reformed into a new religious movement in the pluralistic landscape.

There are nine chapters in this book, the first five deals with children's education and women's issues, and the last four deals with reshaping of ISKCON. I found the first chapter most interesting as it sums up the life experiences of a young gurukuli growing up in Vrindavan, India, and New Vrindaban, WV. The story is very touching as he goes through the personal tragedies of losing his mother and then abuse he faced as a gurukuli and constant struggle to make a life outside (after leaving the organization) but still interested in the spiritual side of Hare Krishna movement. It is an excellent chronicle of how second generation ISKCON community members struggled to survive in a system that was increasingly becoming difficult. The ISKCON leadership was surprisingly anti-family since they were committed to expanding the movement through preaching and book distribution. They denigrated the family life in an effort to protect these goals. Tragically this resulted in neglect and abuse of children and women. Until early 1980s the leadership exercised considerable control over the lives of its members, especially women.

It is horrific to read the child abuse that occurred in the gurukula system and the profound effects it had on children and parents. When you read about the immense sacrifices of founder Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada and latter disciples such as Aindra Prabhu, Mother Hladini, Bhaktimarga Swami, and many others, you feel a sense of triumph and victory. Many of these devotees offered some of the proudest moments in the bhakti movement of Krishna Consciousness. But the criminal behavior of few leaders swamps the lake of purity and tranquility; it clouded the joy of kirtan chanting, the spirit of ISKCON movement. The past abuse of children and depriving women of basic human rights is unforgivable, but the readers must note that much of reported abuse occurred mainly in North America, and the pedophiles who came from hippie background found refuge in a system that was too trusting.

The author presents an interesting discussion in Chapter 8 on "Hindus and Hinduization" as how a radical and controversial new religion has evolved into a new denomination in order to survive in the face of severe financial crisis. The author's interviews with a number of early ISKCON members of North American origin seem to suggest that their mission is directed towards racial segregation. Some temple presidents silently support that by doing very little to promote a dialogue with Indians. A researcher of ISKCON Philadelphia found that 40% temple residents have no communication with Indians. A significant leadership is critical of Indians. Fewer and fewer Westerners are choosing to attend Sunday feast because of Indians at the service. At a 2005 community meeting of long time Western devotees acknowledged that they stopped going to the temple because of large Indian gathering. In the Dallas ISKCON community, the temple holds separate feasts and worship services at different times on Sunday for Indians and Westerners. The Atlanta temple is also considering separate Sunday programs. This temple is also considering separate space devoted exclusively to Western preaching.

Many Christian churches including very fundamentalist churches, than ever before, have become multicultural and promote dialogue with other races. Even Islamic mosques have found significant converts into its faith. In major cities it is not uncommon to see a woman of North American origin to be covered with hijab or burqa or niqab. Many of these converts pray in mosque with African, Asian and Middle Eastern races. If people of North American origin can accept Islam as their faith, a religion that expresses a great deal of intolerance to other faiths, other cultures, and denial basic rights to women, then how is it that some ISKCON members express discomfort to pray with Indians in a temple? This group may comprise of small fringe elements. Let us hope the segregation enthusiasts are not a major group within ISKCON, but if this is the desire of the majority of Western devotees, then they have everything to lose as an organization. Ever since man set foot on this planet, racism came into existence and it will continue to exist as long as man is living on this planet; this is the natural order of things. But "civilized people" could do without that at least in one place, the place of worship.

Although this is well researched work about the history of Krishna consciousness, I came across several typographical and grammatical errors; the editors could have done a better job.
Gaxaisvem
In answer to Linda M. Steven's review of Burke Rochford's Hare Krishna Transformed, I have to wonder if she understands that there is a difference between a religion, or a religious social movement, and its institutional expression. Almost no religious institution lives up to the ideas of the founder/founders and ISKCON is no exception.

I believe the reasons for this are the high ideals of religious scriptures and exemplars, and the actual consciousness of those who claim allegiance to them. To fulfill the original charter of an organization called the International Society for Krishna Consciousness is a tall order. I believe Rochford has shown the heroic efforts of those who tried to fulfill the order, even if they failed. In my experience, most of the devotees of the Hare Krishna religion are very sincere, and they have found the founder's teachings to be more than adequate.

The institution--that's another story.
Valawye
In interesting and perceptive look at the political wrangling that has gone on within the movement's leadership over the years. Burke-Rochford speculates with regard to the future direction of ISKCON as a religious institution, and documents the experiences of second generation Hare Krishnas throughout their early school years. This could be a book that outsiders see as evidence of ISKCON's inadequacy as a spiritual movement. My own thoughts were that the evidence presented was exactly as I expected, and that such an open examination can only serve to facilitate a stronger move forward in the right direction.
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