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eBook Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 23: Jews in Krakow epub

by Michal Galas,Antony Polonsky

eBook Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 23: Jews in Krakow epub
  • ISBN: 1904113648
  • Author: Michal Galas,Antony Polonsky
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Littman Library Of Jewish Civilization (January 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 584 pages
  • ePUB size: 1503 kb
  • FB2 size 1462 kb
  • Formats mbr txt lrf doc


Antony Polonsky is Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies at Brandeis University and chief historian of the Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews in. .

Antony Polonsky is Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies at Brandeis University and chief historian of the Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. Series: Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry (Book 23). Paperback: 584 pages. Publisher: Littman Library Of Jewish Civilization (January 1, 2011).

Start by marking Polin Volume 23 Jews in Kraków as Want to Read . Kraków―one of the great centres of Jewish culture in east-central Europe―has always had a special place in the hearts of its Jewish inhabitants, much more so than was ever the case elsewhere in Poland.

Start by marking Polin Volume 23 Jews in Kraków as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Considering Jewish life in the city from a wide range of social and cultural perspectives, primarily in the last two centuries, the contributors to this volume present a fas Kraków―one of the great centres of Jewish culture in east-central Europe―has always had a special place in the hearts of its Jewish inhabitants, much more so than was ever the case.

Book 5. Polin Volume 5: A Journal of Polish-Jewish Studies. This volume focuses on Polish Jews in Germany,.

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1: Poles and Jews: Renewing the Dialogue, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 2: Jews and the Emerging Polish S.Book 5. This volume focuses on Polish Jews in Germany. ore.

The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization in association with Liverpool University Press. Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 23. Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry. Michal Galas and Antony Polonsky. Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 13. Antony Polonsky and Antony Polonsky.

Antony Polonsky, Israel Bartal, Gershon David Hundert. The socialist ideals of brotherhood, equality, and justice have exercised a strong attraction for many Jews. On the Polish lands, Jews were drawn to socialism when the liberal promise of integration into the emergent national entities of east and central Europe as Poles or Lithuanians or Russians of the Hebrew faith seemed to be failing. For those Jews seeking emancipation from discrimination and the constraints of a religious community, socialism offered a tantalizing new route to integration in the wider society.

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 23: Jews in Krakow. Book in the Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Series).

Antony Barry Polonsky (born 23 September 1940, Johannesburg, South Africa) is Emeritus Professor of Holocaust Studies at Brandeis University. He is the author of many historical works on the Holocaust, and is an expert on Polish Jewish history. Antony Polonsky was born in Johannesburg, South Africa to Lithuanian Jewish immigrant parents who arrived in South Africa in the late 19th century

Few issues have divided Poles and Jews more deeply than the assessment of the Nazi genocide in Poland, in which 90 per cent of Polish Jewry perished.

Few issues have divided Poles and Jews more deeply than the assessment of the Nazi genocide in Poland, in which 90 per cent of Polish Jewry perished. Many Jewish historians have claimed that the Polish government's attempt to undermine the economic viability of the Jewish community after the death of Pilsudski in 1935 made Hitler's task easier

Book Description: From 1772-1918 Jews were concentratede more densely in Galicia than . ISRAEL BARTAL and ANTONY POLONSKY. Stranger in our Midst: Images of the Jews in Polish Literature (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996) pp. xv + 402. ISBN 0-8014-2865-3

Book Description: From 1772-1918 Jews were concentratede more densely in Galicia than in any other area in Europe. Bartal (modern jewish history, Hebrew University of Jerusalem) and Polonsky (Judaic and social studies, Brandeis University) are joined by a number of other scholars of Judaism to explore the Jewish community in Galicia and its relationship with the Poles, Ukranians, and other ethnic groups. ISBN 0-8014-2865-3.

Few Polish cities have evoked more affection from their Jewish inhabitants than Krakow, and this volume brings together the work of leading historians - from Israel, Poland, Great Britain, and the US - to explore how this relationship evolved. It takes as its starting point 1772, when Poland was partitioned between the Great Powers and Krakow came under Austrian rule, and it examines the relationship between the Jewish minority and the Polish majority in the city in the different stages of its history down to the period of German occupation during World War II. An additional perspective is provided by a consideration of how Jewish life in Krakow has been remembered by Holocaust survivors and how it is portrayed in post-war Polish literature. The main explanation for the specific nature of relations between Poles and Jews in Krakow seems to be that Jewish acculturation to Polish culture was more pronounced in Krakow than anywhere else in Poland. The Jewish community as a whole opened itself up to contemporary currents and participated in the life of the city, above all in its cultural dimension, while nevertheless retaining a highly articulated sense of Jewish identity and unity. This meant that Jews were able both to defend their interests effectively and to establish links with the rest of the population from a position of strength. An additional important factor appears to have been the more tolerant atmosphere which prevailed in the Austro-Hungarian empire, which meant that ethnic tensions were less acute than elsewhere on the Polish lands. Furthermore, the fact that the city was largely pre-industrial and conservative, and was a spiritual and intellectual center for both Catholics and Jews, may paradoxically have mitigated ethnic conflict, as did the fact that the two societies - Polish and Jewish - were largely socially separate. While the increase in anti-Semitism after 1935 and the consequences of the Holocaust are still etched in the minds of many, the city nevertheless has a special place in Jewish hearts and will continue to be remembered as one of the great centers of Jewish culture in east-central Europe. As in other volumes of Polin, the New Views section examines a number of important topics. These include a general investigation of the situation of the Jews in Galicia, an analysis of the position of Jewish slave laborers in the Kielce area under Nazi rule, an investigation into the resurgence after 1944 of the myth of ritual murder, and a discussion of the history of the Jewish settlement in Lower Silesia after the World War II.
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