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eBook How Do We Know This?: Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism (Suny Series in Judaica) epub

by Jay M. Harris

eBook How Do We Know This?: Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism (Suny Series in Judaica) epub
  • ISBN: 0791421449
  • Author: Jay M. Harris
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SUNY Press (November 9, 1994)
  • Pages: 379 pages
  • ePUB size: 1975 kb
  • FB2 size 1832 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf lit doc


Jay M. Harris describes the fragmentation of modern Judaism in terms o. .

Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism (Suny Series in Judaica : Hermeneutics, Mysticism and Religion) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is a study of rabbinic legal interpretation (midrash) in Judaism's rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods. Jay M. Harris describes the fragmentation of modern Judaism in terms of each denomination's relationship to classical Judaism's system of interpretation in part two of this book.

This book is an excellent introduction to halachic midrash and is especially valuable in understanding how 19th century Jewish scholars dealt with rabbinic exegesis. By focusing on typical examples of reform and orthodox scholarship, Harris illuminates the entire period without bogging the body of the book in detail.

Jay M. Harris, How Do We Know This? Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism (Albany: SUNY Press, 1995) more.

uk/?book 0791421449 none Read Online PDF How Do We Know This?

I am seeking articles or book chapters that deal with the authority or status of classical midrash in Jewish biblical interpretation, especially how .

I am seeking articles or book chapters that deal with the authority or status of classical midrash in Jewish biblical interpretation, especially how midrash is used/treated in modern rabbinic sermons/divrei Torah. Thanks in advance! Categories: Front Page Item, Query. Keywords: midrash, sermons, Query, front page item. There is a whole book on this from a modern perspective: "How do we Know This? Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism" by Jay M Harris (2012). View published(active tab).

Intertextuality and the Reading of Midrash. Harris, J. How Do We Know This? Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism. Special books and articles will be added in accordance with the student’s particular area of interest. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Boyarin, D. Carnal Israel. Albany: SUNY Press, 1995. Examination HJ2: Medieval Jewish Thought and Histoty (Professor Robinson). HJ2: History of Judaism, Medieval The medieval exam requires the student to demonstrate expertise in medieval Jewish thought set in a broad historical and cultural setting.

Harris, J. How Do We Know This? Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism (Albany, 1995). Nachman Krochmal: Guiding the Perplexed of the Modern Age (New York, 1991). Havlin, S. Al‘ha-H. atimah ha-Sifrutit’ ke-yesod ha-H. alukah le-Tequfot be-Halachah, in Meh. karim be-Sifrut ha-Talmudit (Jerusalem, 1983). Hezser, . The Social Structure of the Rabbinic Movement in Roman Palestine (Tübingen, 1997).

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. SUNY Series in Judaica : Hermeneutics, Mysticism, and Religion. Midrash, Mishnah, and Gemara : The Jewish Predilection for Justified Law. by: Halivni, David Weiss. Main Author: Harris, Jay M. Format: eBook. Subjects: Jewish law Sources. Halakhah in the Making : The Development of Jewish Law from Qumran to the Rabbis.

Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern Judaism, Albany: SUNY Press, 1995, especially pp. 173-250, though the entire book is. 173-250, though the entire book is relevant to our theme. doc The Rebirth of Omnisigificant Biblical Exegesis 203 we find seven essential elements which require us to tradition in regard of mitzvot whose. See How Do We Know, pp. 137-172, where Harris concentrates on the challenge to midrash, but notes the difficulties of proposing a biblical base for nineteenth century Mosaic religion.

Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern

Midrash and the Fragmentation of Modern. Judaism (Albany NY: SUNY, 1995), 9, 11; David Novak, The Talmud as a Source for Philosophical. known and unstated background to which an author alludes, Tannaitic law can be. understood as common sense norms instead of as conceptually based laws.

This book is a study of rabbinic legal interpretation (midrash) in Judaism’s rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods. It shows how the rise of Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox Judaism in the modern period is tied to distinct attitudes toward the classical Jewish heritage, and specifically, toward rabbinic midrash halakah.What has gone unnoticed until now is the extent to which the fragmentation of modern Judaism is related to the interpretative foundations of classical Judaism. As this book demonstrates, spokespersons for any form of Judaism that engaged modernity on any level had to explain the basis for their rejection or continued acceptance of the authority of rabbinically developed law. Inevitably and invariably, this need led them to address anew what were long-standing questions regarding the ancient interpretations of biblical law. Were they compelling? Were they reasonable? Were they still relevant? Each form of Judaism fashioned its own response to these challenges, and each argued forcefully against the responses of the other denominations.Jay M. Harris describes the fragmentation of modern Judaism in terms of each denomination’s relationship to classical Judaism’s system of interpretation in part two of this book.
Comments: (2)
Burirus
This book is an excellent introduction to halachic midrash and is especially valuable in understanding how 19th century Jewish scholars dealt with rabbinic exegesis. By focusing on typical examples of reform and orthodox scholarship, Harris illuminates the entire period without bogging the body of the book in detail. I would highly recommend it to all scholars in Jewish studies and to the casual reader who would like to know more about the relationship of the Biblical text to the Jewish tradition.
IWAS
This work is a overwhelming survey of the understanding of rabbinic hermeneutics from the Talmudic period until the 19th century Harris deals with all the material in stride, and does not fall into the trap of seeing one author as nothing but a "precursor" or "influence" over the other. Even more so, he managed to take a topic which seems esoteric and technical but actually, as he shows, became one of the major bones of contention in the confrontation of traditional judaism with modern historical thinking. It would be worthwhile for the author to add an appendix bringing the debate up to date and emphisizing the thoelogical and legal ramifications of the debates on rabbinic hermenutic (such as the recent work of Moshe Halbertal). But don't wait for that. Read it now!!
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