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eBook The History of Bukhara epub

by Abu Bakr Muhammad Narshakhi

eBook The History of Bukhara epub
  • ISBN: 1558764194
  • Author: Abu Bakr Muhammad Narshakhi
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: World
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Markus Wiener Publishers (December 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 196 pages
  • ePUB size: 1840 kb
  • FB2 size 1560 kb
  • Formats mobi txt doc lrf


Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Jafar Narshakhi (or Narshaki) (ca. 899–959), from the village of Narshak in the Bukhara oasis is the first known historian in Central Asia.

Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Jafar Narshakhi (or Narshaki) (ca. His unique History of Bukhara was written in Arabic and presented to the Samanid emperor Nuh I either in 943 or 944. The book provides important information on Bukhara that cannot be found in other contemporary sources. Nothing is known about Narshakhi except his authorship of this one book.

Al-Narshakhi's The History of Bukhara is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive . I was disappointed in the book

Al-Narshakhi's The History of Bukhara is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time. I was disappointed in the book. I had read good things about Narshakhi, and I am fascinated by the history of Central Asia, of which Bukhara was an important part, but this wasn't what I hoped it would be. It is primarily of use as a source for scholars, I believe. If you happen to be a scholar of Central Asia (which is getting much more attention of late), then this could be a good book for you to read, as it is original source material, well translated by Richard Frye.

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Narshakhi's History of Bukhara is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time, as opposed to the standard biographies of religious leaders

Narshakhi's History of Bukhara is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time, as opposed to the standard biographies of religious leaders. Richard Frye's translation from the Persian presents an engaging, readable narrative that recreates the lively intellectual and commercial life of this vibrant ancient city. In the tenth century, Bukhara was a cultural center that rivaled Baghdad, and was known as the dome of learning in the East.

Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Jafar Narshakhi (or Narshaki) (c. Other translations of The History of Bukhara. 899–959), from the village of Narshak in the Bukhara oasis is the first known historian i. The book provides important information on Bukhara that cannot be found in other contemporary sources Other translations of The History of Bukhara. In 1128 or 1129, Abu Nasr Ahmad al-Qubavi translated Narshakhi's original Arabic text into Persian, with abridgments and additional content to extend the history to 975.

The History of Bukhara by. Abu Bakr Muhammad I. Narshakhi, Abu Bakr Muhammad I. Narshakhi.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 6% restored. Главная The history of Bukhara; translated from a Persian abridgement of the Arabic original by Narshakhi The history of Bukhara; translated from a Persian abridgement . .

Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn al-Narshakhi of Bukhara wrote the history of his city and presented it to the Samanid ruler Nuh ibn Nasr in 943 . This is the only book he is known to have written. Narshakhi's ""History of Bukhara"" is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time, as opposed to the standard biographies of religious leaders.

The history of Bukhara by Abū Bakr Muḥammad ibn Jaʻfar Narshakhī . Mediaeval Academy of America

Are you sure you want to remove The history of Bukhara from your list? The history of Bukhara. Mediaeval Academy of America. Publication, no. 61, Publication (Mediaeval Academy of America) ;, no. 61. Classifications. His unique History of Bukhara was written in Persian and presented to the Samanid emperor Nuh I either in 943 or 948. In 1128 Narshakhi's book was translated into Persian (with abridgements). Nothing is known about Narshakhi except his authorship of this one book, which provides important information on Bukhara that cannot be found in other contemporary sources.

Al-Narshakhi's The History of Bukhara is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time, as opposed to the standard biographies of religious leaders. Richard Frye's translation from the Persian presents an engaging, readable narrative that recreates the lively intellectual and commercial life of this vibrant ancient city. In the tenth century, Bukhara was a cultural center that rivaled Baghdad, and was known as "the dome of learning in the East." It was a dynamic metropolis, capital of the semi-independent dynasty that ruled most of present-day Iran and Central Asia. It was in Bukhara that the so-called Persian Renaissance began, with its far-reaching literary implications. Al-Narshakhi portrays not only rulers, but also everyday life in cities and villages. This primary source affords insights into life in Eastern Iran and Central Asia during a period of change in the Islamic world.
Comments: (2)
Zulkishicage
I was disappointed in the book. I had read good things about Narshakhi, and I am fascinated by the history of Central Asia, of which Bukhara was an important part, but this wasn't what I hoped it would be. It is primarily of use as a source for scholars, I believe. If you happen to be a scholar of Central Asia (which is getting much more attention of late), then this could be a good book for you to read, as it is original source material, well translated by Richard Frye.
Rocky Basilisk
Bukhara seems to have been not only an important religious destination going back 10,000 years, but it has played a critical role in various religions such as idol worshipers of the early Sumerian era, Tengerism, Hinduism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, Judaism, and finally Islam. The book is rich in the oral history of the region, and there are many interesting stories about the villages that once existed in the ancient times, or what the landscapes surrounding the entire region of Bukhara were once like before the building of permanent settlements. As it's well known many of the Islamic historians originally came from this region and wrote extensively about the Medicinal knowledge that grew from the many civilizations that formed out of this remarkable place, leading to what eventually came to be known as Chinese medicine. Ancient Iranian folk tales are also written about, since many of the important symbolic characters of the Persian empire had to pass through this region, either erecting villages in their own name or constructing fire worshiping temples. The ancient Dravidian town names were well recorded in the oral histories, names that are now no longer even mentioned or spoken of.

For those interested in Islamic history this book would be equally interesting. There are many stories written about the early Arab invaders who forced the people into accepting Islam. Since this book was originally recorded as it was presented at an Arab court in the 9th century it was astonishing to read the extent to which cruelty was allowed to be written about. That is the level of torturous cruelty practiced towards the people who refused to accept Islam as a religion in this particular region. Beginning with the first appointed Umayyad caliphs well into the rule of the Abbasids this region endured many turmoils first for not accepting Islam and later for it's acceptance of Islam. According to these early accounts several of the Arab commanders would raid these towns from Bukhara to Transoxania every summer for many years to simply stock up on slaves, and to raid the enormous wealth of these trading towns. Eventually, the frequent battles,and damaging losses by the raids caused enough bloodshed that this ancient trading town and the entire region was no longer able to maintain its valuable crop lands, or its lucrative trading routes. Even after Islam was forcefully accepted, the Arab commanders fought each other over the use of the lands leading to more cities being burned to the ground, and more of the people being massacred. In one of the many yearly invasions alone 40,000 slaves including royal family members of Bukhara and Samarqand were slaved and taken back to Mecca to be sold into slavery or to be put to work on the farms of Medina and the surrounding towns of Saudi Arabia.

To better understand the effects of all these changes the silk road and trade is brought to ones attention repeatedly. The silk road that we know of during the Islamic times seems to have been far more lucrative before the Arab invasions, and the resulting devastation forced the region into rewriting itself in the Islamic era as Arab commanders were reappointed to each town along this very important trading route. Yemenites were also actively settled in at this time by Arab commanders who seemed to have shared parts of the former city centers after forcefully replacing the former townspeople. Inhabitants of towns such as Bukhara, Samarqand, and Balkh were eventually forced by Islamic leaders to give up half of their homes, and lands to Arab settlers who chose this alternative as the final step in converting the people to Islam. Living amongst the local people all year around in their own residence eventually paved the way for the evolution of Islam to take place, and securing the silk roads wealth in the hands of the Muslims. Also note worthy, are the Many Turkish tribes who are mentioned of, who seemed to have also come face to face with the Arabs during this time period. The Turks were allied with the original townspeople, but soon became enemies of each other as these towns were replaced with Islamic converts. It is a heart breaking history to say the least, but worth learning about since all the names and dates are meticulously recorded, and therefore can be researched further.
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