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eBook U.S. V. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case epub

by Steve Lohr,Joel Brinkley

eBook U.S. V. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case epub
  • ISBN: 007135588X
  • Author: Steve Lohr,Joel Brinkley
  • Genre: Law
  • Subcategory: Business
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1st edition (August 10, 2000)
  • Pages: 349 pages
  • ePUB size: 1927 kb
  • FB2 size 1365 kb
  • Formats docx doc lrf mobi


Joel Brinkley and Steve Lohr covered the story for The New York Times from the beginning.

Joel Brinkley and Steve Lohr covered the story for The New York Times from the beginning. Given that, this book is likely to become the definitive work on the case for the general reader. The book really does not go either prosecution or defense. It simply reports on what happened, and goes over the entire story. It is well written, as well.

Its a book worth picking up if you're interested in Microsoft and/or the .

The book really does not go either prosecution or defense. The only problem I have is that the book repeatedly uses articles by either Steve Lohr and Joel Brinkley (also the authors of this book). I didn't pick this book up for newspaper clippings. If you want to understand the Microsoft case - the people behind it and the evolving context of antitrust law - this is the book. What it is, really, is a reference work - the New York Times coverage - surrounded by additional reporting and writing from the authors Joel Brinkley and Steve Lohr.

Joel Brinkley, Steve Lohr. The implications of this battle will affect everything from electronic commerce to network communications.

Joel Brinkley (Brinkley, Joel). used books, rare books and new books. by Joel Brinkley, Steve Lohr. V. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case: ISBN 9780071355889 (978-0-07-135588-9) Hardcover, McGraw-Hill, 2000. Atlas historique d'Israà l, 1948-1998. Find all books by 'Joel Brinkley' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Joel Brinkley'. Cambodia's Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land. ISBN 9780071355889 (978-0-07-135588-9) Hardcover, McGraw-Hill, 2000. Find signed collectible books: '. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case'.

Richard S. Vermut, A Synthesis of the Intellectual Property and Antitrust Laws: A Look at Refusals to License Computer Software, 22 Colum.

World War . : Microsoft and Its Enemies, by Ken Auletta. Richard S. 6. Additional Articles on the Subject. John D. Croll and Brian M. Martin, The Role of Antitrust Enforcement in Standardization in High Technology Issues, SC 71 ALI-ABA 111, 1998.

WIRED’s biggest stories delivered to your inbox. McGraw-Hill on Monday simultaneously released both print and e-book versions of . Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case, by Joel Brinkley and Steve Lohr. The e-book will be sold in all formats, at many outlets

WIRED’s biggest stories delivered to your inbox. Author: WIRED StaffWIRED Staff. The e-book will be sold in all formats, at many outlets. We are trying to set a new standard of customer service with this important front-list title," said Robert Bolick, vice president of director of business development of the McGraw-Hill Professional Book Group.

vs. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case (non-fiction, 2001, co-author with Steve Lohr). The Stubborn Strength of Yitzhak Shamir (non-fiction, 1989). Inside the Intifada (1989). chapter about George W. Bush in The American Presidency (non-fiction, 2004).

Brinkley wrote several books, including . vs. Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case (2000), with Steve Lohr, also a Times reporter; and Cambodia’s Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land (2011).

Table of Contents Also by Joel Brinkley: Title Page Dedication PREFACE Introduction CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER . Microsoft: The Inside Story of the Landmark Case (with Steve Lohr). For Charlotte and Veronica.

Table of Contents Also by Joel Brinkley: Title Page Dedication PREFACE Introduction CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER. I was twenty-seven years old when I was first sent to Cambodia. At that time, barely four years out of college, I worked for the Louisville Courier-Journal in Kentucky. I was covering the Jefferson County School Board, writing about achievement-test scores and high school yearbook sales. Most recently, I’d helped compile the fall school bus–schedule supplement.

An account of the landmark antitrust case chronicles the investigation of Microsoft, examines the key events and personalities of the trial, and discusses the impact of the verdict.
Comments: (4)
Qiahmagha
Looking for an excellent story that seems to deliver both sides of the law suit brought against Microsoft, than this book is a must read for you. The authors take on a delicate subject and give you the best opportunity to make an informed decision.
Using actual court transcripts, documents and company emails, a story develops with a natural curiosity that kept this reader going along and following the story as if it was actually taking place in the present time frame. The story does not read like a mystery novel, a thriller or action story, instead the blend of legal-ease and objective opinion makes the book enjoyable. The overall reality of the storyline is what gives this book a real shot in the arm. Over 350 pages are not near enough to completely cover this story, as there is room for 350 more. The refreshing blend of investigative journalism and objective reporting are certainly the high points of the book. Overall this is one the best books I have read this year.
Gholbithris
I can only recommend this book for researchers who want easy access to the original news articles and other documents regarding the complex and long antitrust case the U.S. government filed against Microsoft. The authors reprinted their own newspaper columns and stories, interspersed with details about the case. It just didn't make for very compelling reading, and I lost interest about 3/4 of the way through the book.
Marilace
I admit I have not read the entire book, but what I've read so far has been very interesting. Its a book worth picking up if you're interested in Microsoft and/or the Microsoft trial of the late 90s (U.S. v. Microsoft).

The book really does not go either prosecution or defense. It simply reports on what happened, and goes over the entire story. It is well written, as well.

The only problem I have is that the book repeatedly uses articles by either Steve Lohr and Joel Brinkley (also the authors of this book). I didn't pick this book up for newspaper clippings. That's why the newspaper articles bother me, and I also believe the articles throw the reader off, because there's no flow of words. While talking about the trial, the authors will throw in an article. It's really a pain, although the articles are well written. I'd prefer a continous story.
Early Waffle
The personal computer software industry has changed the modern world. At the beginning of the 1980s Japan was viewed as eclipsing the United States as the technology leader. Yet a new embryonic industry was about to change all this. The personal computer industry, led by a group of very talented and creative entrepreneurs, was emerging. Without question, Microsoft has been a leader of this industry in the decade of the 80s. In the first half of the 90s Microsoft repeated and built upon its premier leadership. Microsoft's success provided a foundation for the success of the personal computer industry and the many companies associated with it-AOL, Sun, Dell, Gateway, Compaq, Apple, Intel, and others.
In late 1994 a connection between personal computers and the Internet was forged by Mosaic-the first World Wide Web browser. During the next several years the personal computer industry would be fundamentally altered. This was an "inflection point" (or paradigm shift) as described by Andy Gove in Only the Paranoid Survive. Sensing an opportunity to unseat Microsoft as the premier software developer Netscape viewed its web browser as a new platform for software development. Marc Andreesen boasted that the Netscape browser with java technology would reduce Microsoft Windows to a "poorly debugged set of device drivers." The prevailing platform would be the Netscape browser.
Without question, Microsoft was caught off guard by the rapid emergence of the Internet. When Microsoft finally "got it" Netscape had established a solid installed base of satisfied users. Netscape had Microsoft in its sights. With the help of other competitors of Microsoft it embarked on a campaign to unseat Microsoft and allow for new competition to determine technology supremacy.
When Microsoft finally figured out what was happening they went into battle mode. What else would we expect in a free market competitive economy? Now the challenge was to see who would emerge victorious. Microsoft had some advantages. Although it was late to understand and develop browsing software technology, it did have a dominant position in the old (then current) operating system technology. The personal computer technology was changing rapidly. Either Microsoft would adapt to this new Internet technology or it would eventually perish. What were its options? It could build a browser that competed with Netscape and fight head to head. It did this. Microsoft knew that if they lost the browser war they would place the leadership position of their corporation at risk. But in this head to head browser war Microsoft was at a distinct disadvantage. After all, Netscape did not simply want to become the premier browser program, they wanted, with the help of rivals, to replace the operating system supremacy of Microsoft with browser technology that would become the new operating system platform for application software. In short, Netscape wanted to unseat Windows. Obviously, Microsoft didn't want to unseat itself. But in the end that is what Microsoft had to do.
Netscape set out to combine Internet browsing software technology with java and API components that would allow it to replace the major operating system components previously provided by the Windows operating system. The center of gravity for the personal computer software world was shifting from the desktop to the World Wide Web. Microsoft realized that to insure the survival of their operating system, they would have to include browser software components into the Windows operating system.
The struggle between two powerful technology companies was viewed as a "browser war," but was really a struggle for control of the operating system platform. When Netscape began including operating system components and rival java technology into the browser it crossed the invisible line between the browser and the operating system platform. The line is not always distinct and clear. But Netscape's intention was clear.
When Microsoft countered by integrating browsing software technology into its operating system it simply followed a natural course. In fact, no modern operating system can fail to include Internet connection technology.
The titans of the modern software industry engaged in fierce competition. As earlier history had established, operating systems are a natural monopoly. It was likely that only one would survive this clash. The success of modern capitalism is borne out of this competition. Microsoft held the then current monopoly for personal computer operating systems. Netscape began with the monopoly of installed users of browsers.
Prodded by Microsoft's bitter competitors, Netscape began to cry foul when the lead they held in terms of dominating the platform for connection to the Internet was declining. Netscape had the political connections and access to the US Justice Department. Instead of relying on civil action for unfair competition, Netscape was able, with its many allies in the software industry, to convince the U.S. Department of Justice to challenge Microsoft's fairness.
U.S. v. Microsoft by Joel Brinkley and Steve Lohr provides a report of the government's case that is sympathetic to the loser of the technology battle. It is hard not to have sympathy with the underdog.
Microsoft has made an historic contribution to the world, doing more to advance our use of technology than probably any other company in recent times. We must weigh its enormous contribution against its relatively minor infractions. It should be noted that after years of intensive scrutiny and the unparalleled surveillance provided by email, that little compelling evidence is provided. There is certainly no "smoking gun." One wonders how many of Microsoft's competitors could come through the review it underwent less tainted.
Throughout the world today virtually all who use a personal computer are using core software developed by Microsoft. This software is both excellent and inexpensive. But more important, it is constantly being improved. And that is what is at risk in the government's politically sponsored assault on one of America's greatest corporations. What is clear in US v. Microsoft is the absence of concern for consumers-they are at best an afterthought. But shouldn't they be at the center of the case?
Brinkley and Lohr frame their view of the case from a partisan perspective that supports the Justice Department's case. But they take their lead from the judge who, throughout the trial, seems more interested in punishing Microsoft for having his earlier decision overruled by the Appeals Court than seeking the truth. This time the judge seeks to avoid being overturned by denying Microsoft access to the Appeals Court. In the interest of basic fairness, lets hope he is not successful.
One can only hope that Microsoft receives a more balanced hearing at the Appeals level than Judge Jackson provided. After all, this is one of the premier technology corporations in our nations history. I suspect the authors prepared their book on the Microsoft software technology that won its position through much hard work, risk and dedication. If Microsoft is destroyed we all have a lot to lose. Think of this the next time you fire up your computer.
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