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eBook Witnesses from the Grave epub

by Eric Stover,Christopher Joyce

eBook Witnesses from the Grave epub
  • ISBN: 0747505187
  • Author: Eric Stover,Christopher Joyce
  • Genre: Law
  • Subcategory: Criminal Law
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; 1st edition (March 7, 1991)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • ePUB size: 1344 kb
  • FB2 size 1101 kb
  • Formats rtf azw mbr doc


Witnesses to the Grave was okay. It is a very thick read. However, they get a bit melodramatic in their descriptions of everything from the grave openings to Snow's work the several students who served as his assistants

Witnesses to the Grave was okay. However, they get a bit melodramatic in their descriptions of everything from the grave openings to Snow's work the several students who served as his assistants. After a while, we get the picture that Snow's work has served to put many a would-be despot in prison, and we come to understand Snow's view that the worst crime of all is a crime against a person by that person's own government.

Witnesses from the Grave, Christopher Joyce and Eric Stover’s book about famed forensic anthropologist Clyde Snow, tells about many fascinating cases, including identifying the remains of "the Angel of Death," Dr. Josef Mengele, and also the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy. Josef Mengele, and also the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy

Eric Stover is Faculty Director of the Human Rights Center and Adjunct .

Eric Stover is Faculty Director of the Human Rights Center and Adjunct Professor of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. View your shopping cart Browse Penn Press titles in Human Rights, Law, Political Science Join our mailing list.

Witnesses to the Grave was okay.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Witnesses from the Grave by Christopher Joyce . Pages are lightly tanned and lightly creased. Witness from the Grave.

Pages are lightly tanned and lightly creased. by Christopher Joyce ; Eric Stover. Other: Clyde Snow is a practitioner of forensic anthroplogy. Over the last two decades, forensic anthropologists have extended their field of activity from police morgues and air-crash sites to the political arena. Sold bymanyhills (20211)100. 0% positive FeedbackContact seller.

Christopher Joyce; Eric Stover. GENERIC RAW BOOK ZIP download.

More than an expertly spun scientific and political thriller, WITNESSES FROM THE GRAVE is a book of vital importance to anyone concerned with the issues of human rights, criminal justice .

More than an expertly spun scientific and political thriller, WITNESSES FROM THE GRAVE is a book of vital importance to anyone concerned with the issues of human rights, criminal justice, and the accuracy of our historical memory. The human subjects of these studies cry out to the reader from every chapter.

During this time, the organization won the Nobel Peace Prize for its campaign against torture, and the United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights

Witnesses from the Grave. by Christopher Joyce, Eric Stover. Coauthors & Alternates.

Witnesses from the Grave. ISBN 9780517092187 (978-0-517-09218-7) Hardcover, Haynes Publications, 1992. Find signed collectible books: 'Witnesses from the Grave'. Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell. by Christopher Joyce.

So begins Eric Stover's book on the mass graves of Bosnia illustrated by Magnum photographer Gilles Peress. Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell," a book Stover co-authored with Christopher Joyce, describes finding and identifying the remains of notorious Nazi doctor Josef Mengele in Brazil, where Stover accompanied an investigative team from the Simon Weisenthal Institute.

Clyde Snow is a practitioner of forensic anthroplogy. He is employed by police forces and governments in every continent to identify human remains, to interpret the "signatures" in skeletons that are as good as fingerprints in distinguishing one individual from another. Over the last two decades, forensic anthropologists have extended their field of activity from police morgues and air-crash sites to the political arena. Among Snow's most celebrated cases have been the Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele, the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy, the soldiers who died with General Custer at Little Big Horn in 1876 and the thousands in Argentina who "disappeared" under the military junta. This book is a scientific study in which the adventures of Clyde Snow are interwoven with an exploration of the techniques used in the Mengele investigation and in criminal and political cases all over the world. It reads like a detective story and at the same time traces the dramatic advances that have been made in forensic methodology.
Comments: (7)
elektron
Need to finish this book, I am anxious to read the rest of the book.
TheJonnyTest
To many people should be a must, to to acknowledge the cruelty of our world (since the very beginning). Is it in our genes??
Unsoo
Another good forensics book if you are into learning of such things. Just like the other forensics book I did a review on it was recommended reading for a CEC credit course I was taking. Yup, nailed the course with a 96, glad I bought it and read it.
Global Progression
A gripping story about the modern origins of forensic anthropology, expertly told in vivid writing. The topic has gotten only more important as international tribunals for Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and domestic truth commissions continue the work of uncovering and prosecuting atrocity crimes.
Vijora
The Prologue tell of Clyde Snow's visit to Bolivia. Their law allowed the police to arrest anyone off the street and send them to a work camp without a trial. Some of these died from being shot while in custody. Clyde Snow's father was an M.D. who practiced in the Texas panhandle, east of Lubbock and beside the railroad. Chapter 1 tells of Snow's life and career. Hunters, and gatherers of wild crops, are famed for discovering lost bodies (p.33). Chapter 2 tells of the trial of Dr. John Webster for the murder of Dr. George Parkman. It gives the history of forensic identification by Bertillon and Vucetich. Chapter 3 tells of the trial of Adolphe Luetgert, who killed his wife and boiled her body in lye to destroy the evidence. The influence of Bertillon advanced forensic anthropology in Europe (p.77). Diet and modern medicine have changed bones (p.83). Anthropologists helped to identify the remains of dead soldiers, and recalculated height from the femur (p.84)

Page 101 tells of the "human error" involved in body identification after an airplane crash (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 tells how the identity of murder victims can be established by recreating a face from a skull, but its not perfect. It won't work if the family will not identify the victim. Chapter 6 tells how the identity was found for a modern mummy. Chapter 7 tells of identifying the bones found at the site of "Custer's Last Stand". Was George Armstrong Custer really buried in General Custer's tomb (p.146)? Chapter 8 tells how Snow identified the skeleton of Josef Mengele. Was there conflict amount the government agencies (p.162)? Chapter 9 has the final solution to the identity of Josef Mengele with "reasonable scientific certainty" (p.200). Chapter 10 tells how they found Mengele's dental records (p.208). They could not do DNA testing (p.211).

Chapter 11 tells of the Argentina politics that killed thousands of its people. Under Peron the life of the people improved, until he was overthrown (p.219). When Peron returned, conflict continued and thousands were made to disappear (p.220). This terror was described on pages 222 to 228. One effect was to loot the country by skyrocketing foreign debt (p.227). Clyde Snow and his colleagues came to Argentina to identify the unnamed remains. [There is no mention of what the Ford and Carter administrations were doing.] Snow gathered a group of students to learn his techniques for identifying people from their bones. Chapter 12 tells of the identification of one of the victims, Liliana Pereyra. She had given birth before she was murdered, and the child also disappeared.

Chapter 13 explains how Snow used the statistics of anonymous burials to prove the murder of thousands (p.27). Most anonymous burials are of old men, not people in their twenties. Another statistic was the high number of those dying from gunshot wounds (p.273). Snow's Argentine team was invited to the Philippines by President Aquino (p.277). A new Argentina law excused "torture, murder, arbitrary arrest, and misrepresentations" if the perpetrator was just following orders (p.279)! Chapter 14 ends the book telling about the ongoing investigation into the identification of unnamed bones. Appendix 1 names the parts of the human skull. Appendix 2 names the parts of the human skeleton. [Are these military putschs possible in a nation that has a right to keep and bear arms?]
Vikus
Witnesses to the Grave was okay. Barely. It is a very thick read. It moves slowly with a lot of unanswered questions. The chapter about Joseph Mengele brought it up to two stars, otherwise it would have been one star at best. If you like forensic books, look elsewhere.
Feri
As an anthropology enthusiast, I've been devouring books about anthropology, particularly forensic anthropology. Clyde Snow figures into most texts about the exploits of the intrepid forensic anthropologist, so I chose to read this one, as well. Generally speaking, the book is well written. We are introduced to Dr. Snow in a retelling of some skeleton identification work he did in Bolivia--a good way to entice the reader. We next learn a bit about Clyde Snow himself--his childhood, his years as a hard-living underachieving young man, and finally his entre into the forensic sciences. We also learn a bit about the history of forensic anthropology, which provides a nice framework for the reader.
The remainder of the book focuses on Snow's more exciting work, such as the identification of Josef Mengele's bones in Argentina. It deals a lot with Snow's work with human rights organizations, identifying the bones of those slaughtered by their oppressive governments. Snow continues that work around the world to this day, and it is interesting reading--to a point.
The authors give good details concerning the events that lead to the untimely demise of thousands of innocent people, mostly in Argentina during late 1970's when the military junta was in power, and explains why Snow is involved in vindicating the dead there. However, they get a bit melodramatic in their descriptions of everything from the grave openings to Snow's work the several students who served as his assistants. After a while, we get the picture that Snow's work has served to put many a would-be despot in prison, and we come to understand Snow's view that the worst crime of all is a crime against a person by that person's own government. But there reaches a point where the human rights discussion just becomes tedious. Yes, you want to read more about Snow's exploits, but you find yourself wishing that they will be anywhere but Argentina, and that they will involve someone other than a person murdered by an oppressive government.
On the whole, it's a good read, and I'd recommend it to others interested in forensic science. Don't feel bad if you don't read it cover to cover though. To be honest, by the time you decide to put it down you have probably read enough that, if you don't finish it, you won't be missing anything.
Seemed like an interesting subject but this book was weak. Nothing special.
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