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eBook Generation Existential: Heidegger's Philosophy in France, 1927–1961 epub

by Ethan Kleinberg

eBook Generation Existential: Heidegger's Philosophy in France, 1927–1961 epub
  • ISBN: 0801473829
  • Author: Ethan Kleinberg
  • Genre: Medicine
  • Subcategory: Psychology
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (November 20, 2006)
  • Pages: 308 pages
  • ePUB size: 1176 kb
  • FB2 size 1678 kb
  • Formats mobi docx txt azw


Ethan Kleinberg's book presents one history of the reception of Heidegger's thought in France. I suspect that Dominique Janicaud's Heidegger in France gives a more comprehensive history. Sarah Bakewell and Gary Gutting have covered much of the same history in recent books.

Ethan Kleinberg's book presents one history of the reception of Heidegger's thought in France. Ethan Kleinberg reads the reception of Heidegger as falling into three phases. Briefly the first phase gave rise to the existentialism of Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. The second phase was a reaction to the humanism of the first phase and began with the publication of Heidegger's Letter on Humanism.

Kleinberg, Ethan, 1967-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Cornell University Press.

In 2006 his book Generation Existential: Heidegger’s Philosophy in France, 1927-1961 . In Generation Existential, Ethan Kleinberg shifts the focus to the initial reception of Heidegger's philosophy in France by those who first encountered it.

In 2006 his book Generation Existential: Heidegger’s Philosophy in France, 1927-1961 was awarded the Morris D. Forkosch prize for the best book in intellectual history by the Journal of the History of Ideas. In 2011 he was Directeur d’études invité at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris.

In Generation Existential, Ethan Kleinberg shifts the focus to the initial reception of Heidegger's philosophy in France by those who first encountered it. Kleinberg explains the appeal of Heidegger's philosophy to French thinkers, as well as the ways they incorporated an. . Kleinberg explains the appeal of Heidegger's philosophy to French thinkers, as well as the ways they incorporated and expanded on it in their own work through the interwar, Second World War, and early postwar periods. In so doing, Kleinberg offers new insights into intellectual figures whose influence on modern French philosophy has been enormous, including some whose thought remains under-explored outside France.

In Generation Existential, Ethan Kleinberg shifts the focus to the initial reception of Heidegger's philosophy in France by those who first encountered i. When we think of Heidegger's influence in France, we tend to focus on such contemporary thinkers as Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jean-François Lyotard.

No Cover Image ETHAN KLEINBERG.

Generation Existential: Heidegger's Philosophy in France, 1927–1961. Published by: Cornell University Press.

Автор: Kleinberg Ethan C Название: Generation Existential: Heidegger& Philosophy in France, 1927-1961 .

Generation Existential will be of interest not only to intellectual historians but also to anyone still grappling with the legacy of Sartre, Kojève, Blanchot, and Levinas.

When we think of Heidegger's influence in France, we tend to focus on such contemporary thinkers as Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jean-François Lyotard. In Generation Existential, Ethan Kleinberg shifts the focus to the initial reception of Heidegger's philosophy in France by those who first encountered it. Kleinberg explains the appeal of Heidegger's philosophy to French thinkers, as well as the ways they incorporated and expanded on it in their own work through the interwar, Second World War, and early postwar periods. In so doing, Kleinberg offers new insights into intellectual figures whose influence on modern French philosophy has been enormous, including some whose thought remains under-explored outside France.

Among Kleinberg's "generation existential" are Jean Beaufret, the only member of the group whom one could characterize as "a Heideggerian"; Maurice Blanchot; Alexandre Kojéve; Emmanuel Levinas; and Jean-Paul Sartre. In showing how each of these figures engaged with Heidegger, Kleinberg helps us to understand how the philosophy of this right-wing thinker had such a profound influence on intellectuals of the left. Furthermore, Kleinberg maintains that our view of Heidegger's influence on contemporary thought is contingent on our comprehension of the ways in which his philosophy was initially understood, translated, and incorporated into the French philosophical canon by this earlier generation.

Comments: (3)
Erennge
Ethan Kleinberg's book presents one history of the reception of Heidegger's thought in France. I suspect that Dominique Janicaud's Heidegger in France gives a more comprehensive history. Sarah Bakewell and Gary Gutting have covered much of the same history in recent books.
Ethan Kleinberg reads the reception of Heidegger as falling into three phases. Briefly the first phase gave rise to the existentialism of Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. The second phase was a reaction to the humanism of the first phase and began with the publication of Heidegger's Letter on Humanism. This second phase also saw the first of the controversies over Heidegger's complicity with the Nazi regime. The third phase is represented by the work of Maurice Blanchot and Emmanuel Levinas. Kleinberg argues that those two thinkers used aspects of Heidegger's thought to move beyond Heidegger. Their thought is presented as a reaction to the first two phases of Heidegger's reception in light of the Shoah.

Kleinberg sees that first phase as a reading of Heidegger that was as much about the state of French philosophy at the time as it was about Heidegger. Kleinberg presents French philosophical academia in the 1920s as a stultifying mix of Neo-Kantianism and Bergsonian philosophies all based on the Cartesian cogito. This endless repetition of the same was strengthened by the structure of the school system which discouraged any exploration of other schools of thought.
Into this situation, the Hegel seminar taught by the Russian emigre, Alexandre Kojeve, opened up for many young philosophers and thinkers the possibility of completely different approaches to philosophy.
This section opens with a chapter on another émigré, the young Levinas. I would claim that Kleinberg’s book is ultimately as much about Levinas as it is Heidegger. Kleingberg begins and ends his book with Levinas. In this first chapter, Levinas is shown to be responsible for the introduction of Heidegger into France.
This first reading of Heidegger is presented as a very French one. He is seen through the lens of the Cartesian cogito and as a humanist. This section of Kleinberg’s books culminates in a reading of Sartre’s Being and Nothingness as the result of this first phase of Heidegger’s influence.

The second phase of the French reception of Heidegger began immediately post-war and was the result of the work of Jean Beaufret and Frederic de Towarnicki. These two men introduced Heidegger after the war to the work of Sartre and Merleau-Ponty among others.
Heidegger felt that his work had been misread by these thinkers especially by their insistence on the centrality of the individual existent. Beaufret and Towarnicki tried to arrange for some meetings of Heidegger and Sartre which never quite came off.
Heidegger responded eventually with the Letter on Humanism which refuted Sartre’s reading of Heidegger and led to the second phase of Heidegger’s reception. This phase rejected the focus on the individual in favor of “the history of being”. Heidegger declared that he was not an existentialist. (The section of Kleinberg’s book on this essay, pp.184-199 is excellent).
This phase was also marked by the first of the Heidegger’s affairs. These were a series of controversies which seem to erupt every 20 years or so about the extent to which Heidegger’s philosophy is imbued with National Socialism. Kleinberg argues that two main reactions seemed to have established themselves as the only two possible. In the first case, Heidegger is seen to be so implicated by his actions during the Nazi regime that his whole philosophy is put into question. In the second case, the issue of Heidegger’s actions are separated from his philosophy.

The third phase of Kleinberg historical scheme is seen as a result of the first two phases and show that a more nuanced reaction to Heidegger is possible. Maurice Blanchot and Emmanuel Levinas, after the war, confronted the unimaginable, the Shoah. In both cases, they are shown to have read Heidegger to go beyond Heidegger.
The presentation of Levinas is especially interesting. In fact, I would offer Kleinberg’s last chapter on Levinas as a good introduction to that thinker’s work.

I am not sure why I don’t rate this book higher. The scholarship is solid and most of the exegesis is lucid. One complaint I could make is that the history seems selective. My impression is that there are just as many major figures who should have been included as have been included. I suspect that Kleinberg’s choices were made because of the way they fit into his overarching framework.
But let us end on the positive. There are good discussions of Kojeve, Sartre, Aron, Heidegger, Blanchot and Levinas. There is a provocative mix of history, philosophy and the sociology of education. And I came out of my reading of this work with more reading to do and with a better understanding of work I have read before. That really should be enough.
Majin
A great critical-historical reconstruction of the intellectual and social roots of twentieth century French philosophy, from Russia and more.
virus
Prof. Kleinberg takes you through the significance of Heidegger's philosophy to the modern Frech existential philosophers (Satre, Blanchot, Levinas, etc..) This is a particularly tricky subject because many of France's modern thinkers were Jewish (or Lefty's) and Heidegger was a Nazi. Kleinberg is able to address how Heidegger's philosophy continued to push itself into the modern thought discourse in France despite the social conflict his politics presented. It's a good historical narrative with plenty of tizight philosophical exogesis. Need to twist your noodle and learn about a really interesting period in western history? Give this one a shot.
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