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eBook Rex Zero and the End of the World epub

eBook Rex Zero and the End of the World epub
  • ISBN: 1428733183
  • Genre: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux
  • ePUB size: 1483 kb
  • FB2 size 1875 kb
  • Formats lrf doc mbr lrf


For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows.

For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows. He's just moved to Ottawa from Vancouver (and, before that, from Britain) and since it's the summer you would think that there would be some kids about to play with. There are kids, sure, but whenever Rex sees them they're usually moving as fast as they can In 1962 the end of the world is near. At least that's what the crazy guy with the sign walking around the streets of Ottawa would have you believe. Set during the threat of the Cold War, Wynne-Jones infuses this tale with humo Rex Zero and the End of the World by Tim Wynne-Jones Cold ip/Moving On.

If his name is Rex Zero and he has a bike he calls "Diablo," five wild and funny siblings, an alpha dog named . He lives near Perth, Ontario.

If his name is Rex Zero and he has a bike he calls "Diablo," five wild and funny siblings, an alpha dog named Kincho, a basement bomb shelter built of old Punch magazines, and a mind that turns everything inside out, he's bound to come up with an amazing idea.

For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows I love to be carried into a story on a magic carpet of laughter, and that's what Tim Wynne-Jones does for us here. I love to be carried into a story on a magic carpet of laughter, and that's what Tim Wynne-Jones does for us here. Rex Zero wins my heart immediately by assigning random numbers to his paint-by-number paint pots and then watching with interest to see how the pictures turn out. So believable and original.

Sequel to: Rex Zero, king of nothing. Melanie Kroupa books. In the summer of 1962 with everyone nervous about a possible nuclear war, ar-old Rex, having just moved to Ottawa from Vancouver with his parents and five siblings, faces his own personal challenges as he discovers new friends and a new understanding of the world around him.

For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows They're all English speaking countries, but somehow such books are almost exotic to us. Even in the depths of their suburbia, they're exotic

For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows. They're all English speaking countries, but somehow such books are almost exotic to us. Even in the depths of their suburbia, they're exotic. This, to my mind, is what sets Mr. Wynne-Jones apart as an author.

And more Rex Zero adventures are promised! .

And more Rex Zero adventures are promised! Rex Zero and the End of the World is a 2008 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year. About the Author: TIM WYNNE-JONES is one of Canada's premier children's authors.

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Assuming no year zero, that means the end would come in 1658. This mathematician calculated the end of the world would be this year based on calculations from the Book of Revelation.

Assuming no year zero, that means the end would come in 1658. Mede claimed that the Antichrist had appeared in 456, and the end would come in 1660. This prophet predicted that Judgement Day would occur this year.

ar-old Rex, having just moved to Ottawa from Vancouver with his parents and five siblings, faces his own personal challenges as he discovers new friends and a new understanding of the world around him.

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Comments: (6)
Malara
Wynne-Jones wonderfully captures the mind and speech of middle graders. He also does a great job in this book bringing to life a historical time - the cold war sixties. With humor, he portrays how silly many adults reacted to the threat of nuclear war and how their reactions effected their children.
Wynne-Jones makes his story relevant with the strong thread of making friends in new places.
RUsich155
I recently ran across a book of short stories by Tim Wynne-Jones and enjoyed it so much that I looked for other things he had written. This Rex Zero book is from 2007 and not available at the local library so I bought a used copy. I'm glad I did because I consider it a keeper. The author's portrayal of the ten-year-old main character and his family is endearing, and the story moves at a good pace. This review might not mean much since the book was published over ten years ago, but I just want to send out a little praise for Tim Wynne-Jones. I'm a fan and hope he writes many more books!
Jay
You ever read an author, love their work, and then wake up at 2 a.m. with the sneaky suspicion that maybe all their books are good and that you've simply been missing out all these years? That's me, that is. I'm that. I've just read me a Tim Wynne-Jones book, thought it was top notch work, and then I started telling this to people. "Oh," they would say with sly little smiles plastered all over their faces. "And have you ever read anything by Tim before?" "Well, no," I'd confess. My compatriots would then nod sagely and the conversation would turn elsewhere, leaving me with the vague feeling that maybe I couldn't judge "Red Zero and the End of the World" unless I'd somehow read its author's entire children's literary oeuvre. Then I'd remember that a good reviewer reviews the book in front of them and not how that book stands up in the face of the writer's previous titles. So if you're already a Tim Wynne-Jones fan, I have good and bad news for you. The good is that I loved this book and I think it's great. The bad is that I don't know if it's any greater than anything else he's ever done. I guess you'll just have to pick yourself up a copy of this puppy and determine the rest for yourself.

In 1962 the end of the world is near. At least that's what the crazy guy with the sign walking around the streets of Ottawa would have you believe. For Rex Norton-Norton (Rex Zero, for short), the world might well be ending for all he knows. He's just moved to Ottawa from Vancouver (and, before that, from Britain) and since it's the summer you would think that there would be some kids about to play with. There are kids, sure, but whenever Rex sees them they're usually moving as fast as they can away from him. It's very mysterious. Soon the boy befriends some of the locals and the truth comes out. The kids of the town are terrified because there's a gigantic panther on the loose. It's been sighted, but no adult is willing to believe this improbable possibility, which means that it's up to the kids to capture the beast and save themselves. Set against the backdrop of the Cold War in a time of uncertainty and paranoia, author Tim Wynne-Jones constructs an elegant metaphor for a time when people fight against a misunderstood threat with potentially disasterous results.

We, as Americans, don't read a lot of children's books where the hero is a Brit who has moved to Canada. They're all English speaking countries, but somehow such books are almost exotic to us. Even in the depths of their suburbia, they're exotic. This, to my mind, is what sets Mr. Wynne-Jones apart as an author. He fills his book with distinctive details that round out the text and, at the same time, keep the story amusing to child readers. For example, I liked it when Rex sat watching television with his parents, slowly coming to the realization that they were so wrapped up in the program about the Cold War that they've forgotten he's even there. Rex eventually feels so freaked out by the programs that he's obliged to yell, "What am I doing here? . . . Somebody, please make me go to bed!" It's bits like these that give the story the feeling that everything here is, somehow, "real".

You won't find a shortage of quality children's fiction pertaining to the 1960s in the world today. Paranoia makes for strong literature, particularly in these paranoia-laden times in which we live. Of course paranoia, which is to say kid-friendly paranoia, can take on a variety of different forms. In this particular book, it trickles down to the kids in the neighborhood, causing them to see monsters in the very streets around them. In books like The Loud Silence of Francine Green by Karen Cushman, though, the metaphor is a bit more open and blunt, rendering the book a mature and entirely different beastie. What distinguishes "Rex Zero" then is how child-friendly the entire book is. You like Rex. You like his kooky family. You like them in spite of the fact that writing original kooky families is almost impossible in this day and age. Child and adult readers are almost entirely kookied out. It takes a great deal of restraint and training to write one with as strong an undercurrent of truth as is found in "Rex Zero". I credit the fact that Mr. Wynne-Jones has based much of the story here on his own family and you can feel that love emanating from his writing. When Rex and his younger sister share a joke that only the two of them find funny and end up rolling under the kitchen table with laughter, that scene alone struck me as almost too true to write.

I've heard some people complain that this book is too blatant with its incomprehensible 1962 references and props. For example, Rex lives in a home that he has named the House of Punch, due to the overabundance of old Punch magazines currently littering the basement below. Or there are his multiple references to "real Wonder bread" which is more than mildly baffling to any reader, young or old. All that aside, I didn't feel that any of this hurt the potential audience of this title. Fleeting confusion is hardly the be all and end all of any title, let alone one as fun and enthralling as this.

"Rex Zero and the End of the World" may be a period piece, but its premise is as timely as ever today. With a great cast of characters, top notch writing, and a story that keeps you guessing, this is one of the unsung gems of the 2007 year. Well worth a gander, should you get a chance to note it.
Windforge
It's the summer of 1962, and a panther has escaped from the Granby Zoo--wherever that is.
At first Rex Zero, newly moved from Vancouver to Ottawa, doesn't understand why his new town has no kids his own age. Well, he sees a few, but never for long: they always appear to be fleeing in terror. His sister Annie Oakley says they're running away from mutants caused by atomic radiation. An old man at the park claims the world is ending and even knows the date: October 23.
Having four sisters and a brother called "the Sausage" isn't the same as having friends. Rex spends the summer days riding his trusty bike Diablo or working on his paint-by-number kits. Carefully he relabels each little pot of paint. "The colors of his face are supposed to be 37 and 39, which means that in my version they are 6 and 4: a kind of sickly yellow and an apple green. He doesn't look as if he likes sailing all that much. Or maybe he's thinking about the sandwiches they packed for their picnic." Rex's unique artwork becomes a metaphor for his new life: a world turned inside out.
Before long Rex meets other sixth graders who aren't running, and learns that they believe an escaped panther is lurking in the park. An aging World War I veteran suffering the aftereffects of mustard gas and a sympathetic beatnik poet contribute clues that help Rex unravel a series of unsettling events. When Rex recruits his new classmates in a plot to trap the panther, he gets more than he bargained for.
Plentiful period references, from Sea Hunt to Sputnik, are arguably more appealing to boomers than to preteens; how many ten-year-olds will appreciate a quip about Khrushchev's shoe? The atmosphere is authentic, however, giving a strong sense of what it was like to grow up during the duck-and-cover Cold War. The attitudes and emotions portrayed offer surprising parallels to today's experience of growing up with the possibility of nuclear war.
Despite the sober subtext, Rex's first-person narrative is rich with goofy humor. "We've smashed the joke atom, and now even the simplest of words is dangerously funny." History, mystery, humor and suspense work well together in a savory mix that can't be classified. Rex Zero and the End of the World is a serious story that successfully avoids taking itself too seriously.
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