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eBook Puttering About in a Small Land epub

by Philip K. Dick

eBook Puttering About in a Small Land epub
  • ISBN: 0897331494
  • Author: Philip K. Dick
  • Genre: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Academy Chicago Publishers; First Edition edition (1985)
  • Pages: 291 pages
  • ePUB size: 1232 kb
  • FB2 size 1900 kb
  • Formats mbr doc lrf lrf


Home Philip K. Dick Puttering About in a Small Land. Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

Home Philip K. Puttering about in a sm. .Puttering About in a Small Land, . 175 Fifth Avenue.

Puttering About in a Small Land is an early non-science fiction novel by American science fiction author Philip K. Dick. It was written sometime in 1957, but remained unpublished until it was released posthumously in 1985

Puttering About in a Small Land is an early non-science fiction novel by American science fiction author Philip K. It was written sometime in 1957, but remained unpublished until it was released posthumously in 1985. In 1944, Virginia Watson and Roger Lindahl meet in Washington DC. They marry after Roger divorces his first wife Teddy and abandons his daughter by her as well. Their subsequent move to Los Angeles to work in a munitions factory proves extremely profitable

the plot of this book is not the draw. it's the fine characterizations Dick works, getting us so deeply into the characters' heads that we find ourselves puttering about in the smallest land of all: the space inside the skull

the plot of this book is not the draw. it's the fine characterizations Dick works, getting us so deeply into the characters' heads that we find ourselves puttering about in the smallest land of all: the space inside the skull. and damn! this is the second of Philip K. Dick's non-sf fiction that i've read, and i'm telling you, there's something rather addictive about them. this book is about two couples in LA in the late 40s/early 50s, the postwar era. they meet, have adventures, get into trouble.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Written in the late 1950s but unpublished until after his death, this is one of Dick's greatest realistic novelsWhen Roger and Virginia Lindhal enroll their son Gregg in Mrs Alt's Los Padres Valley Scho. Written in the late 1950s but unpublished until after his death, this is one of Dick's greatest realistic novelsWhen Roger and Virginia Lindhal enroll their son Gregg in Mrs Alt's Los Padres Valley School in the mountains of Southern California, their marriage is already in deep trouble. Then the Lindhals meet Chic and Liz Bonner, whose two sons also board at Mrs Alt's school. The meeting is a catalyst for a complicated series of emotions and traumas, set against the backdrop of suburban Los Angeles in the early 1950s

Dick, Philip K. Publication date.

Dick, Philip K.

At first she thought it was Irv Rattenfanger; it was his ’34 Buick, but loaded with boxes and crates. A rack had been welded to the top and it was full, too. she recognized Roger Lindahl, the man who had drunk up her bottle of wine at the Rattenfangers’ party. He was crammed into the front seat with the boxes. Waving merrily, he parked the car and got out to run around and leap up on the curb. Today his mood was buoyant, but she shrank away

Puttering About in a Small LandCritical opinion informs us that in his 1950's and early 1960's non-sf work, Philip K. Dick dealt with suburban life on the west coast.

Puttering About in a Small LandCritical opinion informs us that in his 1950's and early 1960's non-sf work, Philip K. How many besides me automatically assume that any novel from that time, set in the suburbs, must necessarily deal with adultery? Show of hands, please - yeah, most of us.

Puttering About In a Small Land. Filled with the details of everyday life and skillfully told from three points of view, Puttering About in a Small Land is powerful, eloquent, and gripping. Written 1957, first published 1985. Publisher: Tor, New Yourk, 2009. By the time Roger and Virginia Lindhal enroll their son in Mrs. Alt’s Los Padres Valley School in the mountains of Southern California, their marriage is already in deep trouble. Then the Lindhals meet Chic and Liz Bonner, whose two sons also board at Mrs. Alt’s school.

Philip Kindred Dick was an American writer known for his work in science fiction. His work explored philosophical, social, and political themes, with stories dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes, authoritarian governments, and altered states of consciousness. His writing also reflected his interest in metaphysics and theology, and often drew upon his life experiences, addressing the nature of reality, identity, drug abuse, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences.

Book by Philip K. Dick
Comments: (7)
Kefym
I've read 2/3 of PKD's works now, even the off-stuff and found this one simply uninteresting. I felt somewhat like I was reading about a mild version of an early daytime soap opera with nothing really all that outstanding about any of the characters. I tried very hard to get into this book, picking it up and only really being able to read a few pages at a time without feeling sleepy and bored stiff. I started over, just to see if I missed something, and now just have given up halfway through. I prefer his whacked-out sci-fi over this. If you aren't so much into that, then this may be your cup of tea. For me, it just isn't worth trudging through the rest of the book....I really couldn't care less about the characters, the place, the time, or anything whatsoever about what was going on. Life is too short to waste your time on such an unimportant book.

UPDATE (spoilerish): I finally finished the book...2 months to finally drag myself to the last page. It did get better about 3/4 of the way in and was interesting toward the end, but wow...it just took forever for things to really get moving. It is sort of like reading about what would happen if Ward Cleaver went out and fooled around with someone and June Cleaver deciding to use his infidelity for her gain and to meet her own needs instead of just dumping him. It's a rather odd ending, and seems apparently like Roger ended up leaving for Liz after grabbing a bunch of sets to deliver on his way out of town to go to her...and thus leaving the shop to her and Liz's husband who remained clueless throughout. That's my interpretation anyway.
JOIN
I've read a few of PKD's sci-fi books, but this was my first non-sci-fi by him, and I was very impressed! It was very well written. In fact, this easily stands up to the well-known "classic" chronicles of domestic life in the 1950's: Revolutionary Road, The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit, etc.

The story is very realistic, but the mundane setting and events are kept from being boring by the insightful looks at the characters. He does a great job getting inside the heads of the female characters, particularly the wife. The main (male) character, however, is less of a success for me, mostly because he is rather unlikable.

3.5 stars, rounded up to 4. I'll definitely look for more early PKD non-sci-fi.
Daiktilar
This book, a story about a TV repairman and his family in 1950's California, contains many of the elements contained in Dick's science fiction novels: bleak emotional landscapes; the aggressive wife; the everyman character stuggling to get by in the world. But it's missing the inventiveness, the creepiness, and also the humor of his SF work. This one dragged for me, a bit, though it does contain some memorable characters.
This is one of several non-science fiction novels Dick wrote in the 1950s in an attempt to gain recognition as a serious writer. It didn't work (while he was still living), and he went back to solid SF at some point. This one is worth reading for sure if you like PKD, but it's not up there with his very best science fiction.
Opimath
Absolutely brilliant book. A wonderful portrayal of how complex married life can be and how the people in those marriages have to deal with such complex emotional situations. Philip K. Dick deserves to be rated among our best realist novelists.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
Puttering About in a Small LandCritical opinion informs us that in his 1950's and early 1960's non-sf work, Philip K. Dick dealt with suburban life on the west coast. How many besides me automatically assume that any novel from that time, set in the suburbs, must necessarily deal with adultery? Show of hands, please - yeah, most of us. Well, "Puttering About" certainly deals with cheating spouses, to a greater extent than maybe anything else PKD ever wrote. On the other hand, this author never treated classic stories in a classic fashion. Let's see how he handled a story about musical beds.

Here's the setup - Virginia and Roger Lindahl, a squabbling Los Angeles couple who own a television shop, enroll their young son Gregg in an Ojai boarding school. They agree to share weekend driving chores with another set of parents, Chic and Liz Bonner. Ojai is about 70-80 miles from Los Angeles, and the husband of one couple finds himself on a long road trip with the wife of the other couple. Hijincks ensue.

As I hinted above, this is pretty typical stuff for a certain kind of late-50s American storytelling. On the other hand, "Puttering About" does not restrict itself to the story of the affair. You get a wide spectrum of postwar American experience, including some flashbacks to the Lindahls' lives before and after their marriage. They have lived through some big changes, moving with America from a more rural lifestyle to a more urban one, and moving with America through World War II and the postwar economic boom. Like a lot of fictional characters in the same circumstance, and probably a lot of real people, Virginia and Roger find themselves discontented and looking for excitement when the Bonners come along. I'm not entirely sure why this search for meaning seems to involve adultery so often in American letters, but it's one of PKD's gifts that he can make it seem almost sensible.

This is not what makes this novel special, though. PKD made the bizarre seem plausible, and vice versa, in a great many of his writings - that's nothing new for him. "Puttering About" stands out in his work for two very particular reasons.

First, although his understanding of women sometimes left something to be desired, PKD made a serious attempt in "Puttering About" to describe a woman's sexuality, from as close to the actual experience as he could imagine. Since he was a master of the imagination pretty nearly all his life, the attempt is a notable success. Mind you, it may not be accurate (I suppose that only a woman could judge), but it's at least plausible, and it may be among the earliest writings to question the idea that a man "gets" a woman in sex. For a man who went through five marriages and God knows how many relationships, PKD deserves some credit for even making the attempt to empathize with a woman's experience, especially since it obviously cost him some effort in the writing of it.

Second, "Puttering About" contains some engaging structural experiments; PKD usually let his stories drift wherever they would, but this novel shows signs of more careful construction. For instance, he uses the scenery between Los Angeles and Ojai, and the behavior of the Ojai birds, to reflect on the characters' sense of liberty or constraint in their lives. And as I said earlier, we get a number of flashbacks, mostly from Roger's point of view, that comment on his actions in the novel's present moment and on the way the other characters react to him.

This experiment doesn't always work; it stops dead about halfway through the book, and there's no clear relationship between the activity of the main plot and the content of the flashbacks. That is, when Roger reminisces about his childhood on an Arkansas farm upon seeing the horses at his son's new school, you can see why; he's on another farm. It's another matter when he recalls the bar fight he got into shortly after his marriage, in which he lost some teeth; this doesn't seem to have any bearing on the main action surrounding it. Loose scenes like that drifting around, well-written though they are, seem like no more than a kind of psychological backdrop to the story, and as such rather unnecessary. Particularly in view of the fact that PKD almost certainly put more work into "Puttering About" than into a good bit of his sf, you would think it would be more effective.

Be that as it may, I remain impressed that the man had the gumption to play around with his work in this manner. What's more, for a novel that starts out like so many suburban-adultery stories and revolves around some frankly unpleasant characters, "Puttering About" gives us a nice ambiguous conclusion. The title comes from the manner in which Virginia characterizes her husband's life and work, and it's fitting; the environment seems to have all these characters pretty well trapped. Then Roger and Virginia take some actions that completely break things open, and the story just doesn't end up the way you expected. But then, as I've said before, this is PKD.

Turns out that this is much more than a story of adultery - most such stories probably are, anyway. In this case, what we actually have is a conflict between two visions of a good life. According to one character's notion, a good life consists of success in a large ambition, a big plan. According to another's, a good life consists of the freedom to do as you please. I'll leave it to you to discover which character pursues which dream, not to mention determining which dream you like better. Figuring that out for yourself is, of course, one reason to read books like this.

Benshlomo says, Choose your road carefully - you never know what you'll find on it.
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