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eBook Who's Afraid: Facing Children's Fears With Folktales epub

eBook Who's Afraid: Facing Children's Fears With Folktales epub
  • ISBN: 0585178739
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Facing Children's Fears with Folktales as Want to Read

Facing Children's Fears with Folktales as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author: Livo, Norma J ISBN 10: 087287950X. Показать все 2 объявления с новыми товарами. Facing Children's Fears with Folktales by Norma J. Livo (1994, Paperback). Напишите отзыв первым Об этом товаре.

book by Norma J. Livo. This collection presents stories in the context of children's most common fears. A specific fear is dealt with in each chapter, which begins with one or more relevant tales.

Fear and violence in folk and fairy tales have a legitimate reason to be. .Facing Children's Fears with Folktales.

Fear and violence in folk and fairy tales have a legitimate reason to be prevalent in our increasingly violent and fearful culture. Exposing children to controlled violence in books allows for healthy discourse and provides a means to discuss fears and insecurities in the real world. Make-believe characters and fantasy contribute in a positive way to the dialogue-in ways in which a violent television show or movie could not. Gillian Cross wrote in the School Library Journal, "I think crucial to the nature of children's fiction. Englewood, Colorado: Libraries Unlimited, 1994.

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Teaching Elementary Science: Whos Afraid of Spiders.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Are you sure you want to remove Who's afraid- ? from your list? Who's afraid- ? facing children's fears with folktales

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. September 2, 2018 History. Who's afraid- ? Close. Are you sure you want to remove Who's afraid- ? from your list? Who's afraid- ? facing children's fears with folktales. Published 1994 by Teacher Ideas Press in Englewood, Colo.

Children's fears - this is a fairly common phenomenon, which is considered temporary, transient with ag. Children tend to be afraid of many things - darkness, aggressive animals, loneliness. If the parents and the surrounding family members are able to respond to the child's reaction correctly, help him cope with emotions, childhood fears, especially the early ones, go away without a trace. If the child reacts to the most typical, safe situations and objects painfully, for a long time, it speaks about internal and external, seminal problems - the weak nervous system of the baby, conflicts in the family, inadequate behavior of parents and improper education.

Children’s literature provides a powerful resource for helping children face and .

Children’s literature provides a powerful resource for helping children face and overcome fears and challenges. In these books and stories, children will see characters who have challenges or fears similar to their own. They’ll see how the characters face these fears and challenges and what they do to manage or overcome them. Hugo is a bird that’s afraid to fly. I love this story, because he faces his fears and ends up so happy once he’s learned how to fly. I also love that he has such wonderful friends along the way that help him practice and help him through his nerves when he’s scared.

Facing Children's Fears With Folktales.

Comments: (2)
fabscf
teachers and parents need to read this.
Qudanilyr
In Who's Afraid...?, Norma Livo expertly demonstrates how folktales can be used to help children come to terms with their fears. While the book includes a collection of tales, it is more of an instructional guide than a story collection. After a detailed and insightful introductory chapter, the body of the work is made up of chapters that each represent one of the most common fears that children experience. The chapters begin with stories that may help children overcome the associated fear. The stories are followed by extensive discussion, activities, and bibliographical references. They serve as the instructional guide for actively using the stories in the chapter to help children recognize and grapple with their fears. While the target audience for the book is parents who share it with their young children (ages 4-9), Livo expresses the idea that adults are simply grown up children, and as such, are likely to benefit by applying the exercises and reflection to themselves. "There is none among us who is too old or too sophisticated to be touched by a story." Similarly, children ages 8 and up could benefit from reading these stories themselves. (Livo, xvii). In addition, this collection can serve as a useful tool for librarians and teachers who recognize fears in their students and may be in a position to introduce some of the suggested stories and activities in a controlled, safe environment.

The chapter titles come from a list of the most prevalent childhood fears that span cultures, continents, and sex, according to a 1987 study conducted by Kaoru Yamamoto, et al. Livo wisely follows her introductory chapter with two more that touch generally on helping children face their fears and empowering them through stories. The remaining chapters are placed in the order ranked by the children, from most to least frightening of the ten scariest themes. They are, in descending order: losing a parent; being blind; wetting in class; other school fears; being caught stealing; being suspected of lying; health fears; being lost; having a scary dream; and family fears.

Norma J. Livo has a national following as a storyteller. She has written or coauthored a number of books and articles about storytelling. She has served on the board of directors for the National Association for the Preservation and Perpetuation of Storytelling and for the National Storytelling Association. She was the president of the Colorado Council of the International Reading Association and organizer of the Rocky Mountain Storytelling Conference (Livo, 176). She is also a Professor Emerita in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Denver (Livo, title page).

Who's Afraid...? is a seminal work serving as a practical, easy-to-use guide to helping children overcome their fears through stories. Children will be more able to handle their own frightening experiences after they have seen story characters safely navigate similar situations. The activities at the end of each chapter designed to help children shed their fears could clearly be transformative by releasing children from their internal paralyses.

ENDNOTES

Livo, N. J., (1994). Who's afraid...?: facing children's fears with folktales. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Inc.

Yamamoto, K., Soliman, A., Parsons, J, & Davies, O.L., Jr. (1987). "Voices in Unison: Stressful Events in the Lives of Children in Six Countries" Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 28(6), 855-64.
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