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eBook The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves epub

by Siri Hustvedt

eBook The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves epub
  • ISBN: 0340998768
  • Author: Siri Hustvedt
  • Genre: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sceptre; First English Edition edition (2010)
  • ePUB size: 1102 kb
  • FB2 size 1490 kb
  • Formats txt doc docx lrf


Siri Hustvedt, one of our finest novelists, has long been a brilliant explorer of brain and mind. The Shaking Woman is the story-provocative but often funny, encyclopedic but down to earth-of her attempt to answer this question

Siri Hustvedt, one of our finest novelists, has long been a brilliant explorer of brain and mind. But recently this investigation has taken a more personal turn: two years after her father's death, while speaking about him in public, she suddenly found herself seized by convulsions. The Shaking Woman is the story-provocative but often funny, encyclopedic but down to earth-of her attempt to answer this question. It brings together an extraordinary double story: that of Hustvedt's own odyssey of discovery, and of that point where brain and mind, neurology and psychiatry, come together in the realm of neuropsychoanalysis.

So fuk any medico bosherie about Nerves - shaking, quacking or qwacking. Just have 2 vodka martinis and a good laugh. It's a burp, not a book.

Uncontrollable shaking can occur in some seizures. Because of my history, I knew that a careful neurologist would do an EEG, an. My shaking was on both sides of my body - and I had talked throughout the fit. How many people talk through a seizure? Also, I had had no aura, no warning that some neurological event was in the making, as I often do for migraine, and it had come and gone with the speech about my dead father. I’d have to sit with gooey electrodes clamped onto my scalp for quite a while, and my guess is that the doctor would find nothing.

When Siri Hustvedt's father died, she wrote his eulogy and at his funeral delivered it "in a strong voice, without .

When Siri Hustvedt's father died, she wrote his eulogy and at his funeral delivered it "in a strong voice, without tears". Two and a half years later, back in her Minnesota home town, she stood up to talk about him again to a college audience, on the campus where for 40 years he had been a professor of Norwegian studies. An experienced speaker, she was "confident and armed with index cards". But the speech was a disaster. But when the shaking repeated itself, again in public, unpredictably and seemingly disconnected from emotion, she decided to launch a quest to find the shaking woman within herself, "a Mr Hyde to my Dr Jekyll, a kind of double".

While speaking at a memorial event for her father, Siri Hustvedt suffered. A violent seizure from the neck down. She managed to finish her talk and the paroxysms stopped, but not for good. Again and again she found herself a victim of the shudders.

THE FIRST TIME I SHOOK I was standing on home ground. It wasn’t only that my father had taught for many years at the college. As a child, I had lived on that campus because my professor father had a second job as head resident of a men’s dormitory. That old building has since been torn down, but I remember its murky hallways, its smells, the elevator with its red door, the soda pop machine glowing on the floor below us, and the button on it for Royal Crown Cola

Illuminating the core question of her history, Siri Hustvedt, a fearless investigator and lucid storyteller, creates a mesmerizing picture.

Siri Hustvedt (born February 19, 1955) is an American novelist and essayist. Hustvedt is the author of a book of poetry, seven novels, two books of essays, and several works of non-fiction

Siri Hustvedt (born February 19, 1955) is an American novelist and essayist. Hustvedt is the author of a book of poetry, seven novels, two books of essays, and several works of non-fiction.

In The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves, which I wrote while I was still working at the hospital . That night, I was having trouble sleeping for the first time since being admitted. I was thinking about what Siri had said to me. A real writer was telling me that I could be a writer.

In The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves, which I wrote while I was still working at the hospital, I described the effect of the words I remember. My hand moves to write, a procedural bodily memory of unconscious knowing, which evokes a vague feeling or sense of some past image or event emerging into consciousness. Then the episodic memory is present and can be articulated with startling suddenness. 22 Writing I remember over and over again fuels a machinery of remembering.

While speaking at a memorial event for her father, Siri Hustvedt suffered a violent seizure from the neck down. She managed to finish her talk and the paroxysms stopped, but not for good. Again and again she found herself a victim of the shudders. What had happened?Chronicling her search for the shaking woman, Hustvedt takes the reader on a journey into contemporary psychiatry, neurology and psychoanalysis. She unearths stories and theories from the annals of medical history, literature and philosophy, and delves into her own past. In the process, she raises fundamental questions: what is the relationship between mind and body? How do we remember? What is the self?In a seamless synthesis of personal experience and extensive research, Hustvedt conveys the often frightening mysteries of illness and the complexities of diagnosis. As engaging as it is thought-provoking, The Shaking Woman brilliantly illuminates the age-old dilemma of the mental and the physical, and what it means to be human.
Comments: (7)
Agamaginn
I didn't know what to expect. I was engaged by the title. I was soon grabbed by the author's dilemma, her mystery. Indeed, the book reads like a mystery -- with side trails to explore possible things that might be relevant to her disquieting malady. I am a lover of mysteries, but also am a practicing neurologist and have not infrequently found myself in the common ground between neurology and psychiatry. I won't spoil the plot. But I will say that I found the author's delving into conditions such as epilepsy and conversion disorder spot on. I think this book should be read not only by medical students rotating through neurology or psychiatry but also by residents/trainees in those disciplines. If you yourself or a loved one are caught up in a confusing psychiatric-type situation, this would be a good book to read. You are not alone.
Joel Herskowitz, M.D., Co-Author of "Pediatrics, Neurology, and Psychiatry: Common Ground" and "Twisted," a play about a woman with a neuropsychiatric disorder.
Made-with-Love
About a year after her father died, while Siri Hustvedt was giving a memorial speech, she experienced a seizure. Her arms and legs shook uncontrollably, although she was able to continue speaking. This episode, which was followed by other seizures in similar circumstances, led her to write this expansive essay, which touches on the mind-body problem, the connections between psychological and neurological disorders, the nature of self, the human survival instinct, the challenges of living with illness, the biological bases of religiosity, and above all, the role of memory in human existence. Hustvedt did extensive research on these topics and she explores them from philosophical, psychoanalytic, medical, and historical perspectives, weaving in her own personal experiences. This is a challenging book, whose prose at points left me nearly breathless, but it's a fascinating discourse on what makes us, as humans, who--and what--we are.
Nuadabandis
Written in the new "creative nonfiction" style which weaves together personal incident and scientific review, the book is both informative about the state of medical and brain research and questioning about whether the treatment of nervous conditions are merely "a shot in the dark" or simply part of unchangeable genetic endowment. The mystery at the heart of the book is why the author had a serious shaking incident while delivering a tribute for her recently deceased father. In a rich piece of psychological exploration, she explores her own refusal to see herself as a "shaking woman," who might be able to benefit from psychoanalysis. She represents well the process by which we come to embrace our newly diagnosed conditions: the initial shock and gradual return of the ability to connect the diagnosis to our past and present lives. Thinking persons will enjoy this well-written memoir of an illness.
Mikarr
I have a history of pseudo seizures resulting from PTSD and prior abuse. I was looking for a cure. This book did not provide a cure, but it gave absolutely wonderful insight to conditions that can affect our central nervous system; and the connection between our minds and bodies. Information can be very enlightening! As a result I can be better at identifying triggers and making the decision to avoid them or deal with them.
Anarus
i found this book fascinating, but far too long for a layman. somehow, it seems to fall between the cracks - the personal narrative is utterly absorbing, but when she tries to fill the experience into an interpretation with academic value, over so many pages, itbecomes tedious. after a while, i found myself asking the question, "Who cares?"
Enila
Siri and I share the same history…leaving Norway at about the same age…making a new life for ourselves in the US…this book convinced me that Siri is totally brilliant…in fact, I think she's a more interesting writer than her husband! I would have given this book 5 stars but it was just toooo heavy! Can't wait to meet her when she comes to Norway in a few weeks…
inetserfer
This book incorporates a lot of studies in the author's discussion of her shaking spells. However, unlike Peter Kramer, who does this with great skill, Siri Hustvedt overloads the narrative. I lost interest at a number of points, although I did finish the book. The author should weave in more personal detail.
Insightful and thoroughly reflective about neuroscience and psychological functioning in a truly entertaining manner. Highly recommended for anyone interested in how the mind works.
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