» » The best seat in baseball, but you have to stand: The game as umpires see it

eBook The best seat in baseball, but you have to stand: The game as umpires see it epub

by Lee Gutkind

eBook The best seat in baseball, but you have to stand: The game as umpires see it epub
  • ISBN: 0803759789
  • Author: Lee Gutkind
  • Genre: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dial Press; No Edition Stated edition (1975)
  • Pages: 209 pages
  • ePUB size: 1838 kb
  • FB2 size 1317 kb
  • Formats doc lit mobi azw


The Best Seat in Baseball by Lee Gutkind is a behind the scenes look at baseball umpires and their daily lives. The book takes place during the 1974 season and follows a group of 4 umpires.

The Best Seat in Baseball by Lee Gutkind is a behind the scenes look at baseball umpires and their daily lives. The reader gets a close examination of their struggles on and off the field. The book is very reminiscent of Ball Four, another controversial baseball book. The reader is introduced to the good, bad, and the ugly of umpiring in the major leagues. Betw The Best Seat in Baseball by Lee Gutkind is a behind the scenes look at baseball umpires and their daily lives.

The Game as Umpires See It. by Lee Gutkind. A fascinating and revealing look inside the lives of umpires, from the godfather of creative nonfiction In 1974, Lee Gutkind walked into Shea Stadium, then home of the New York Mets, with an unusual proposal. He wanted to chronicle one of the least celebrated cadres in professional baseball: the umpires.

To provide this uniqueif controversiallook at major league baseball as umpires see it, Lee Gutkind spent the 1974 .

To provide this uniqueif controversiallook at major league baseball as umpires see it, Lee Gutkind spent the 1974 season traveling with the umpiring crew of Doug Harvey (crew chief), Nick Colosi, Harry Wendelstedt, and Art Williams, the first black umpire in the National League. Since the publication of this book in 1975, neither Harvey nor Wendelstedt have communicated with Gutkind, with Wendelstedt even denying that Gutkind traveled with the crew.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Best Seat in Baseball, But You Have to Stand!: The Game as Umpires See It (Writing Baseball). Gutkind Lee. Year: 2014.

To provide this unique-if controversial-look at major league baseball as umpires see it, Lee Gutkind spent the 1974 season traveling with the umpiring crew of Doug. To provide this uniqueif controversiallook at major league baseball as umpires see it, Lee Gutkind spent the 1974 season traveling with the umpiring crew of Doug Harvey (crew chief), Nick Colosi, Harry Wendelstedt, and Art Williams, the first black umpire in the National League.

A fascinating and revealing look inside the lives of umpires, from the godfather of. .

A fascinating and revealing look inside the lives of umpires, from the godfather of creative nonfiction In 1974, Lee Gutkind walked into Shea Stadium, then home of the New York Mets, with an unusual proposal. As resonant today as when it was first published, The Best Seat in Baseball, But You Have to Stand! is an engrossing story of the men who work on one of the nation’s biggest stages, their victories and their failures, and their inner worlds that are rarely-if ever-explored.

Lee Gutkind, recognized by Vanity Fair as the Godfather behind creative nonfiction, is the founder and .

To provide this unique-if controversial-look at major league baseball as umpires see it, Lee Gutkind spent the 1974 season traveling with the umpiring crew of Doug Harvey, Mick Colosi, Harry Wendelstedt, and Art Williams, the first black umpire in the National League.

An umpire's life-even with the beefs it's about as drab as can be. The National League crew unmasked . The National League crew unmasked here-Doug Harvey, Nick Colosi, Harry Wendelstedt and Art Williams-leave few doubts about their seasonal profession-it's a hazardous (hit by foul tips; spat at with tobacco juice) grind, full of aggravation, abuse and pressure. Their lonely seven-month a year routine provides little relaxation (apart from rubbing baseballs and calling rainouts) and a minimum of satisfaction.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Try another ZIP code. In 1974, Lee Gutkind walked into Shea Stadium, then home of the New York Mets, with an unusual proposal. The Best Seat in Baseball, But You Have to Stand! - eBook.

The Game as Umpires See It (Writing Baseball). Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Comments: (7)
Xisyaco
I used to enjoy this book a good deal for its overall storyline taking place during the course of the 1974 NL season. But time has not been kind to it thanks to something Gutkind didn't know we'd have to access to one day, namely Retrosheet. We now have the ability to look up in an instant the games and events Gutkind describes in such vivid detail as he gives us his narrative of the travails of the umpiring crew he follows, and thanks to that we now discover that there is a lot of what Gutkind wrote that has been embellished or rearranged (or else Gutkind was an incredibly careless taker of notes when describing the game action.

I'll cite just one example. I cross-checked with Retrosheet to find the corresponding game to Gutkind's chapter on Harry Wendelstedt soldiering on in the face of pain after getting hit in the toe with a foul ball. He has this happening in a Mets-Giants game at Shea Stadium and vividly describes players by name ganging up on Wendelstedt after the play, specifically Ron Bryant (Giants pitcher), Dave Kingman (Giants first baseman), Jerry Grote (Mets batter) and Tom Seaver (on-deck hitter). He describes Wendelstedt at first base, and that the game went extra innings adding to his misery until Bobby Bonds homered and Ed Kranepool hit into a DP to end the game.

This game Gutkind describes is pure fiction. Nothing like this ever happened according to Retrosheet because there were no Mets-Giants games that went extra innings in that series, nor one where Ron Bryant pitched or Dave Kingman played first or where Bobby Bonds homered. I did find that in the first game of a doubleheader on May 7, 1974 the Giants beat Seaver 4-3 in nine innings thanks to an 8th inning homer by Gary Mathews (not a sexy enough name I guess), and that Kranepool did fly out to end the game. But Wendlestedt was umpiring at SECOND base in that game, not first. Then if things don't get bizarre, we have a rainout taking place the next day in the next chapter, but that didn't happen, though the May 7 doubleheader may be related to a rainout that happened the previous night.

This alas is not the only example you'll find if you try to do this further in terms of comparing the games described by Gutkind or in conversations with the umps and then try to match them to the real games on Retrosheet. Gutkind clearly was engaging in an act of creative larceny when he wrote this book, rearranging events, making up conversations and inventing whole pieces of action out of thin air to make his narrative more sexy. I'm sure a lot of the broader truths he talked about, like Art Williams struggle to make it as an umpire did happen (the account of Wendelstedt's collapse in Houston is also accurate), but Gutkind's now easy to expose deceit regarding the game action he describes, in which conversations among the umpires during this non-existent game action are important to the narrative, now permanently taints the value of this book. It can no longer be recommended.
Golkree
This writer is angry. He tells a lot of the mean or confrontational side of umpires. He puts them in a bad light. It gets boring. Baseball is fun. This book is not.
Gigafish
Must read for any baseball umpire.
Lo◘Ve
Great read.
Perius
Fun to get inside info, and some funny stories, but way too much preaching that umpires are the moral compass of baseball.
Armin
Fun read , tells the secret ways of the major league umpires. Must read for baseball fan or umpire fan.
funike
I have read a number of books that relate baseball from the umpire’s side of things, and to be honest, I found this one to be the least interesting of the ones I have read. There wasn’t a great “insider” look at the game, and not a lot of humor. Instead, I found the book to be mostly a look at the day-to-day struggles of being an umpire…which I just didn’t find all that interesting.

=== The Good Stuff ===

* The book is a fairly honest look at the life of a few umpires, including such well known figures as Harry Wendelstedt and Doug Harvey, Art Williams and others. This is not a contemporary work,Wendelstedt retired in 1998, and most of the events related happened in the early ‘70’s. For the most part, the stories are timeless, and as interesting now as they were 40 years ago.

* Les Gutkind writes in a easy-to-read style, and the book moves along and I ended up reading it in a single sitting.

* There was some genuine insider information. There were little details on how to prepare the baseballs for a game, a discussion of protective equipment worn by umpires and its affect on the strike zone calls, and the mechanics behind how umpires position themselves and the procedures for determining and making calls.

* The book concentrates on some of the more “mundane” aspects of the umpires lifestyle. Constant travel, the accommodations at ballparks, clothing and protective gear, salary and expenses are all discussed.

* One of the more interesting aspects of the book was the rapid promotion of several umpires due to their minority status, and the difficulties the other umpires had in “covering” for their more inexperienced colleagues. This also provided a nice insight into the mentality of umpires, such as their need to control their environment, refuse to take abuse from players or coaches, and management of the mechanics of the game.

=== The Not-So-Good Stuff ===

* Some of the information is obviously dated and of limited interest. For example, the discussion of strike zones based on the different styles of chest protector in the NL and AL in interesting, but outdated.

* Many of the details related are boring than interesting. I really don’t care what sort of underwear the umpires wear, nor is their choice of footwear of much interest. There is some discussion of the umpires need to “play injured” because of the lack of available substitutes. While this was an interesting point, I believe the situation is much different with today’s contracts.

=== Summary ===

I found the book to be a bit tedious to read. It seems to struggle between humor, seriousness looks at baseball, and the mundane aspects of anyone who travels for business. It never really found a “groove”, and when coupled with the outdated nature of much of the information, it was a tough read.

Die-hard baseball fans might enjoy the book, but I think more casual fans will find it disappointing.

=== Disclaimer ===

I was able to read an advance copy through the courtesy of the publisher and Netgalley
eBooks Related to The best seat in baseball, but you have to stand: The game as umpires see it
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020