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eBook William Golding: The Man who Wrote Lord of the Flies epub

by John Carey

eBook William Golding: The Man who Wrote Lord of the Flies epub
  • ISBN: 0571231640
  • Author: John Carey
  • Genre: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (2012)
  • ePUB size: 1448 kb
  • FB2 size 1264 kb
  • Formats doc mobi lrf rtf


X, 573 pages, pages of plates : 25 cm. "In 1953, William Golding was a provincial schoolteacher, writing books in his breaks, lunch hours and holidays.

X, 573 pages, pages of plates : 25 cm. This was to become Lord of the Flies, a book that would sell in its millions and bring Golding worldwide recognition. Drawing almost entirely on materials that have never before been made public, John Carey sheds new light on Golding.

John Carey's fine biography reveals that William Golding despised both himself and Lord of the Flies, the book that made .

John Carey's fine biography reveals that William Golding despised both himself and Lord of the Flies, the book that made him famous, says Peter Conrad. As a set text for schools, Lord of the Flies went on to sell millions of copies, introducing adolescents worldwide to the idea of original sin and the knowledge of their own barbarity. My childhood reading life began, so far as I can recall, with RM Ballantyne's naively imperialist story The Coral Island; my innocence came to an end when I opened Lord of the Flies, which warps Ballantyne's tale into an allegory about the wickedness of our species and its rightful ejection from the happy garden.

William Golding by John Carey. To begin with he had no better luck with Lord of the Flies. Book of the week: Blake Morrison applauds a biography that deals sensitively with William Golding's private life. Dog-eared after its rejections by other publishers, the typescript (provisional title: Strangers from Within) eventually reached Faber, whose reader, Polly Perkins, dismissed it as an "absurd & uninteresting fantasy" and consigned it to the slush pile. It was rescued by a new recruit at Faber, Charles Monteith, who could see it had potential, provided Golding would agree to major cuts and rewrites.

William Golding book. Lord of the Flies, his first novel, was an immediate success, and was followed by a series of remarkable novels, including The Inheritors, Pincher Martin and The Spire

William Golding book. William Golding was born in 1911 and educated at his local grammar. Lord of the Flies, his first novel, was an immediate success, and was followed by a series of remarkable novels, including The Inheritors, Pincher Martin and The Spire. He won the Booker Prize for Rites of Passage in 1980, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983, and was knighted in 1988.

As Carey writes, ‘Golding complicated and resentful feelings about his first book’s enormous success, which had . For those readers who have read only Lord of the Flies this book is a great introduction to the others, but, of course, no substitute for the novels themselves.

As Carey writes, ‘Golding complicated and resentful feelings about his first book’s enormous success, which had dwarfed everything he wrote afterwards’ (363). The chapter that I found most useful as a companion to one of Golding’s novels was the one on Pincher Martin, written around 1956. One hopes that the publication of this biography will stimulate more interest in the work of this hugely original and successful writer.

William Golding was born in 1911 and educated at his local grammar school and Brasenose College, Oxford. He published a volume of poems in 1934 and during the war served in the Royal Navy. Afterwards he returned to being a schoolmaster in Salisbury.

In 1953, William Golding was a provincial schoolteacher writing books on his breaks, lunch hours and holidays. This was to become Lord of the Flies. In August 2010, John Carey won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, one of the oldest and most prestigious literary prizes in Britain, for his biography of William Golding: The Man who wrote Lord of the Flies. Thirty-one years ago, William Golding was awarded the same prize in the literary fiction section for his work, Darkness Visible.

A biography of the novelist William Golding, whose Lord of the Flies became a bible of tortured adolescence in. .

A biography of the novelist William Golding, whose Lord of the Flies became a bible of tortured adolescence in America, has some lighter notes. William Golding, with the young actors James Aubrey, left, and Hugh Edwards, at Cannes in 1963 for the world premiere of a film of Lord of the Flies.

John Carey's central books, The Intellectuals and the Masses and What Good Are the Arts?, can be reread with astonishment and disbelief (the intended response), but we all know what happens in Lord of the Flies.

John Carey's central books, The Intellectuals and the Masses and What Good Are the Arts?, can be reread with astonishment and disbelief (the intended response), but we all know what happens in Lord of the Flies, and what it means. Or we think we do. It is one of the many happy surprises of this book that Carey expends considerable energy advancing a case for the value and significance of Golding's work. He makes interpretive discoveries in Golding's novels (12 in all), emphasising his refreshing outsider's perspective

The Nobel Prize-winning author of a dozen novels, William Golding is still remembered chiefly for his first dark vision of humanity, Lord of the Flies. Drawing on unpublished papers including the novelists private journal, this illuminating biography plumbs the sources of that darkness in the writer himself; a war hero who considered himself a monster, who battled depression and alcoholism, but put his faith in the imagination above all.
Comments: (7)
Abandoned Electrical
I read "Lord of the Flies" when it was first published, then "The Inheritors, "Pincher Martin," and "The Spire," but then I moved away from England and for whatever reason missed the subsequent books by Golding, although I had been deeply affected by all of these earlier works. This biography is a truly wonderful book. I must thank the author for helping me to understand William Golding, who was a very complex character and would surely defy a more superficial treatment. I was astonished by the insights that he gathers from the slightest of clues and by the detailed research and care that uncovered them. And although he often prefaces the more indirect inferences with disclaimers, they have the ring of truth to me. If they are not in fact true, they are totally in character. But most of all I must confess how delighted I am to learn of the other books that Golding wrote. I look forward to renewed acquaintance with this uniquely gifted author thanks to John Carey, for whom I have nothing but praise and thanks.
Punind
This biography is a fascinating and well written document of one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. It is interesting that although Golding will long be remembered as the man who wrote Lord of the Flies, he really was so so much more than that ... as an artist and as a human being.If you are interested in Golding I highly recommend this book.

SE Robinson
Mavegelv
A pretty good book for profesional studying William Golding, lot of pages, really good!
Snowseeker
I noticed this book and decided that I didn't know about William Golding, and that was John Carey's intent when he titled the book. Carey's well researched and indepth work shows that Golding is more than just the author of "Lord of the Flies." But Carey does too well in explaining the man. He quotes Golding describing himself and Lord of the Flies, "What a good book Lord of the Flies is. I've just re-read it and am quite convinced I never wrote it. I'ts much bigger than I am." The reader of this book must agree with Golding himself: he is a vile, little man who is abusive and difficult. Carey does his job, perhaps too well.
Buridora
This is the first authorized biography of William Golding, one of the 20th century's greatest novelists. Golding, who died in 1993 aged 81, was a prolific novelist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983. Sir William (he was knighted in 1988) was best known for `Lord of the Flies', his first published novel.

This biography was written by John Carey, the literary critic and English literature professor at Oxford. Professor Carey was given access to the previously private archive of Golding, which consists of three unpublished novels, two autobiographical works and a journal of over two million words. While Professor Carey had a wealth of information to work with, it must have been difficult deciding what was most relevant.

After reading this biography, I am moved to read more of Golding's novels, and to reread others. William Golding lived a full and interesting life but it seems that he was often paralyzed by self-doubt and was unable to appreciate the strength of his own writing gift. I have yet to read `Pincher Martin' `The Spire' and `Rites of Passage'. I will reread `The Lord of the Flies' and `Darkness Visible' with a greater appreciation of the man behind the novelist.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
Perdana
In August 2010, John Carey won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, one of the oldest and most prestigious literary prizes in Britain, for his biography of William Golding: The Man who wrote Lord of the Flies. Thirty-one years ago, William Golding was awarded the same prize in the literary fiction section for his work, Darkness Visible. Both were well deserved.

Sir William Gerald Golding (1911-1993), Nobel Prize for Literature winner, is best known for his first novel, Lord of the Flies (1954), but equally for works such as The Inheritors (1955), Pincher Martin (1956), Free Fall (1959), The Spire (1964), and To the Ends of the Earth Trilogy's first work Rites of Passage (1980). Lord of the Flies has reached the 20 million sales mark - a remarkable achievement - and in 2008, The Times ranked Golding third on their list of "The 50 Greatest British Writers since 1945" (i.e. postwar), beaten only by Philip Larkin (a prolific poet) and George Orwell, author of Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949).

Golding never wrote an autobiography, although he started one (Men, Women & Now), but kept a painstakingly detailed and emotive diary that he adhered to daily. In addition to this routine, he reveals an unemotional, single-minded, ritualistic approach to writing. It is these diaries, and the files of Faber & Faber of London's editor, Charles Monteith, that enables Carey to intimately cover almost every aspect of Golding's life, feelings, inspirations, rejections, acceptances, and writing development.

Carey commences at the beginning in a logical sequence that also covers Golding's earlier unpublished works such as Seahorse (1948), Circle under the Sea (1951), and Short Measure (1952). However, it's in the evolution of Golding's first novel that Carey is detailed-obsessed, noting every date (although unlike Golding himself who also noted the hour at which he concluded a novel).

The Lord of the Flies, originally called Strangers from Within, originated when Golding used to read stories about islands to his two children: "Wouldn't it be a good idea if I wrote a book about children on an island, children who behave in the way children really would behave?" he told his wife, Ann. Golding notes in his diary that the novel "came very easily" by way of two mental images: (1) a little boy standing on his head in the sand, delighted to be at last on a real coral island; and (2) the same little boy being hunted down like a pig by the savages the children turned into. He just had to join the two images.
After a series of rejections over seven months, most famously by Polly Perkins of Faber & Faber, who wrote of her impression of Strangers from Within: "Time: the Future. Absurd & uninteresting fantasy about the explosion of an atom bomb on the Colonies. A group of children who land in jungle-country near New Guinea. Rubbish & dull. Pointless." As luck would have it, a young inexperienced Charles Monteith fished it out of the reject pile and realized its potential - with some re-writing. And fortunately Golding accepted the improved ideas and re-submitted the work, fiercely debated internally at Faber & Faber before they relented and published it. So at the age of 42 the school teacher was a published author.

Carey, through Golding's diaries, reveals not only the genesis of ideas for his novels, but also the insecurities, the doubts, the fears, the cockiness, the arrogance, the writer's block, the drinking episodes: in fact all the resoluteness and all the vulnerabilities of a creative author.

Carey's writing is at first annoying, due to the over-use of quotes from Golding's diary and the over-use of detail. Fortunately the content is inherently interesting and inspiring, so much so that the biographical style becomes acceptable. And there are 525 pages in which to be inspired.

Martina Nicolls, Author of "The Sudan Curse" and "Kashmir on a Knife-Edge"
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