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eBook The Effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 in Preventing and Detecting Fraud in Financial Statements epub

by Debra L. De Vay

eBook The Effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 in Preventing and Detecting Fraud in Financial Statements epub
  • ISBN: 1581123183
  • Author: Debra L. De Vay
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Business & Finance
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dissertation.Com. (May 25, 2006)
  • Pages: 236 pages
  • ePUB size: 1858 kb
  • FB2 size 1168 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi azw mbr


stock markets, and to prevent and detect fraud in financial statements as well. The collapse of Enron, WorldCom, and other large corporations in 2001 and 2002 motivated Congress to pass the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX).

The purpose of this legislation was to restore investor confidence in the United States stock markets, and to prevent and detect fraud in financial statements as well. This dissertation examines the effectiveness of SOX for the latter purpose of preventing and detecting fraud, using statistical enforcement data presented by the Securities and Exchange Commission, and financial statement restatement numbers published by the Huron Corporation.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 cracks down on corporate fraud. It banned company loans to executives and gave job protection to whistleblowers. The Act strengthens the independence and financial literacy of corporate boards. Section 404 and Certification. Section 404 requires corporate executives to certify the accuracy of financial statements personally. If the SEC finds violations, CEOs could face 20 years in jail. The SEC used Section 404 to file more than 200 civil cases. But only a few CEOs have faced criminal charges.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 came in response to financial scandals in the early 2000s involving publicly traded .

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 came in response to financial scandals in the early 2000s involving publicly traded companies such as Enron Corporation, Tyco International plc, and WorldCom. The high-profile frauds shook investor confidence in the trustworthiness of corporate financial statements and led many to demand an overhaul of decades-old regulatory standards. The Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002 came in response to highly publicized corporate financial scandals earlier that decade.

Melvin, 2011 pg. 423) On the other hand, William A. Niskanen believed different. Individuals found it difficult to swallow the Act because it was believe to only be enacted so government official could feel better about confronting only a few points of popular concern instead of resolving the matter.

The recent passing of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 resulted in restrictions being placed on the so-called . These acts required auditor attestation of corporate financial statements. Subsequent to the passage of the auditor.

The recent passing of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 resulted in restrictions being placed on the so-called revolving door, where a company hires a senior financial reporting executive directly from its external audit firm personnel from the company's external auditor. attestation requirement, occasional financial reporting scandals erupted.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was established primarily as an attempt to combat an increasing level of corporate fraud and to hold . Oversight systems fraud survey finds Sarbanes-Oxley effective in identifying financial fraud.

However, the level of fraud and the cost of fraud continue to increase. This paper has provided a trend analysis of fraud factors in an attempt to evaluate the factors that are most prevalent so as to assist in the identification of fraudsters and the reduction of fraud occurrences (Bales & Fox, 2011). Business Wire, 1. Retrieved January 30, 2009, from//global. com/ Coenen, T. (1999-2014).

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act was a formal attempt to impose additional joint responsibility on auditors and management .

SOX compliance has been contentious. Corporate executives, politicians and lobbyists have argued that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) of 2002 is a cumbersome and costly regulation that is not effective (Drawbaugh 2012).

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act was passed in 2002, after corporate scandals involving fraud and regulatory mismanagement in. .

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act was passed in 2002, after corporate scandals involving fraud and regulatory mismanagement in companies such as Enron and WorldCom. The Act dictates how all public companies are required to disclose financial information. The requirements of the Act can place a burden on small businesses, and. The Act makes it a crime for companies to publish financial statements containing false or misleading information, or that omit information important to the company's fiscal health. It also holds executives legally responsible for all financial statements and for all internal auditing controls.

Start studying Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 consists of 11 "Titles," the first four of which are directly applicable to auditors

Start studying Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Learn vocabulary, terms and more with flashcards, games and other study tools. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 consists of 11 "Titles," the first four of which are directly applicable to auditors. What is the purpose of Title IV? To address a variety of "enhanced financial disclosures," the most well-known of which deals with required internal control reporting (Section 404), among other matters. Auditing and related attestation, quality control, ethics and independence standards. List the five primary responsibilities of the PCAOB.

The collapse of Enron, WorldCom, and other large corporations in 2001 and 2002 motivated Congress to pass the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). The purpose of this legislation was to restore investor confidence in the United States stock markets, and to prevent and detect fraud in financial statements as well. This dissertation examines the effectiveness of SOX for the latter purpose of preventing and detecting fraud, using statistical enforcement data presented by the Securities and Exchange Commission, and financial statement restatement numbers published by the Huron Corporation. The two methodologies utilized to analyze the data were the unpaired t test and the chi square test. Surveys were also emailed to executives and certified public accountants across the country to extract opinions as to the effectiveness of SOX. The statistical analysis results displayed that in 61% to 65% of the data sets, the numbers prior to the enactment of SOX were no different than the numbers subsequent to the enactment of SOX. The majority of the survey respondents feel that the benefits of SOX are not worth the costs, it is not effective in the prevention and detection of fraud in financial statements, and that it should be modified, but not eliminated entirely. While some sentiment exists that SOX is salvageable if revisions are executed, both the quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate support of the null hypothesis, that SOX is not effective in the prevention and detection of fraud in financial statements.
Comments: (2)
Delirium
With beeing a CIA, CPA and working on my own phd thesis, this books gives on one hand a valuable introduction into the research topic in the development of fraud research with connection to SOX.

On the other side, due to the fact that retrieving data in this area is realls difficult, I do believe that the reached conclusion at the bottom line is ok, because the arguments are attentauted.

But if the readers takes a closer look on the academic reasearch, I am of the opinon, that one should carefully think about the academic proceeding in this phd work and build up its own opinion if the reached conclusions are valid.

Nevertheless it is an interesting book and easy to read.
Purestone
I purchased this dissertation because I am writing a paper on the same topic (but two years later)and really just wanted the bibliography to help with my research. When I first flipped through the information, I was disappointed because the author wrote from the opposing viewpoint. However, there is a great deal of interesting information that, upon consideration, will make my paper much better.

This is written from a business perspective, not from an accounting perspective, but I still recommend it to anyone who needs information about SOX and fraud.
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